Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Mother Nature Network)   The next time you go to the dentist and intensely feel the cold steel bite of his drill spinning vigorously into your decaying, exposed, cavity-riddled tooth, you can now blame a genetic mutation for why the anesthesia didn't work   (mnn.com ) divider line
    More: Scary, Anesthesia, Local anesthetic resistance, Sodium, sodium channels, specific sodium channel, Local anesthetic, Sodium channel, Yale University School  
•       •       •

2547 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Jan 2017 at 9:30 AM (8 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

2017-01-11 11:37:05 AM  
2 votes:

OOF: Is it safe?


I understood that reference.
img.fark.net
OOF
2017-01-11 09:32:56 AM  
2 votes:
Is it safe?
2017-01-11 06:46:53 AM  
2 votes:
For ~25 years I thought dental anaesthetics had no effect on me.

As a kid, back around 1991 I had to have a filling in one tooth.  The anaesthetic numbed my mouth and I was talking funny. . .but I felt EVERYTHING when the dentist drilled me.  He wouldn't believe that I could feel everything and was shouting at me to stop screaming.  It was very, VERY unpleasant and rather mentally scarring to be forcibly held down by the hygenist while the dentist drills, feeling everything the whole way.

It left me with a life-long fear of dentists and dental work.

I finally went to a dentist last month.  The only other dental work I'd had in my whole life was having my wisdom teeth cut out (because the Army required it), and they knocked me out for that one.  I looked up a dentist that would do sedation dentistry, since I thought I was apparently immune to novocaine and would need to be knocked out to do anything to me.

They did a little test.  Nope, not immune.  They were able to do all the dental work I really, really needed with just a local, and I feel a helluva lot better afterwards.  It turns out that small-town dentist was just really incompetent and didn't numb the right part of my mouth, and refused to try again or believe me when I was basically telling him he missed with the first injection.
2017-01-11 07:49:09 PM  
1 vote:

jigger: Dentists are usually in a hurry and don't give the local anesthetic enough time to work. They need to wait like 10-15 min after the injection to start drilling.


When I was a kid, my dentist would give me the shot, then leave me sitting in the chair for so long before he started that it would be wearing off by the time he got to the drilling stage. I developed the bad habits of not breathing and digging my fingernails into my palms out of fear of the pain. The last time I saw him I nearly fainted, and had to hold onto the wall as I was walking out of the exam room. He looked at me as I was leaving and said, "You really ought to see someone about that." I was 11 years old!

For years after, I didn't go to a dentist. Finally got coaxed into seeing a guy at the dental office where a friend worked. He was really marvelous - very patient, willing to take a break whenever the anxiety felt overwhelming. I still don't like the dentist, but I have learned to keep focusing on breathing and consciously unclenching my fists. Believe it or not, it helps that my current dentist has beautiful landscape photos on the ceiling to look at while she works - I can fantasize about being somewhere else.

VogonPoet: OOF: Is it safe?

I understood that reference.
[img.fark.net image 551x308]


I see at least one other person here got it.
/nothing obscure on Fark
2017-01-11 02:38:23 PM  
1 vote:
I actually have facial nerves in odd places. When I needed my wisdom teeth removed, they took xrays that actually were able to show me what had caused ongoing problems with any work I'd ever had done. Apparently, dentists have "normal" places they give shots for locals. If they use those, they actually tag that nerve and a vein that's not in the usual spot either (just barely off), and long story short, I go numb around my eye and temple, not in my mouth.

This has caused ongoing annoyance needless to say as a previous dentist loaded me up on so much local painkillers I'd look like I had a stroke, just to get a freaking filling. I changed dentists to get my wisdom teeth pulled (only the tops), and they started a file that noted alternative needle size, depth and a different poke scheme that significantly narrowed the issue down.

/I was still able to feel my eyeballs in spite of having two wisdom teeth yanked
//it was a whole new world
2017-01-11 12:57:58 PM  
1 vote:

Feel_the_velvet: Genetic mutation?  I like to think of it as a "Super Power"

The man who felt noall pain, as it were.


I think they need to stop calling genetic differences "defects"
fta "The analysis revealed a genetic defect..."
2017-01-11 11:22:05 AM  
1 vote:
As a redhead, with at least five [5] horror stories about local anesthetic and general anesthesia not working at all, I'm glad this is being researched more. No medical professional believed my agony (despite breaking an ER PA's rib while he attempted to stitch my face). Had no idea being resistant was a possibility until I was 16 having my wisdom teeth removed, did not go under after two doses of general anesthesia,  the dentist advised there was research on redhead resistance to anesthetic/anesthesia/pain killers which he had just read about but had yet to witness in office... "Pain is what the patient says it is," I followed that religiously as an EMT due to my experiences.
2017-01-11 11:02:56 AM  
1 vote:

Giltric: Burr: Silverstaff: For ~25 years I thought dental anaesthetics had no effect on me.

As a kid, back around 1991 I had to have a filling in one tooth.  The anaesthetic numbed my mouth and I was talking funny. . .but I felt EVERYTHING when the dentist drilled me.  He wouldn't believe that I could feel everything and was shouting at me to stop screaming.  It was very, VERY unpleasant and rather mentally scarring to be forcibly held down by the hygenist while the dentist drills, feeling everything the whole way.

It left me with a life-long fear of dentists and dental work.

I finally went to a dentist last month.  The only other dental work I'd had in my whole life was having my wisdom teeth cut out (because the Army required it), and they knocked me out for that one.  I looked up a dentist that would do sedation dentistry, since I thought I was apparently immune to novocaine and would need to be knocked out to do anything to me.

They did a little test.  Nope, not immune.  They were able to do all the dental work I really, really needed with just a local, and I feel a helluva lot better afterwards.  It turns out that small-town dentist was just really incompetent and didn't numb the right part of my mouth, and refused to try again or believe me when I was basically telling him he missed with the first injection.

I think I am immune to novacaine.  My dad is as well and we both had different dentists (I have actually had a couple and I could never get numbed) so it is a genetic thing (thanks dad!).

It has left me with crippling anxiety for dentistry.  Even a normal checkup/cleaning I will get anxious.  I went to the dentist for the first time in about 2 years on Monday and I need some cavities drilled, crowns, and a gingivitis treatment.   Due to my insurance I can only get the treatment and the cavities taken care of this year and next year will have to get the crowns.  I will only get sedation treatment now.

I also had braces (and have a permanent bottom retainer) so tha ...

ive woken up with the dentists knee being used for leverage on the armrest as they try yanking a wisdom tooth out which they had already split with a chisel.

and i was told i am at the maximum dose based on my weight and the tooth was halfway out so just gimme a couple more minutes....


When I was 20 I had a wisdom tooth chiseled out with only shots in the gum.  It didnt hurt much but the pressure of the dentist banging on my tooth was unreal.  That experience put me off dentists for 20 years unfortunately.

I finally went back after cracking a tooth on a chicken bone.  I ended up getting 4 crowns over the span of a month and one filling.  Local shots only for anesthetic.  Five hours awake in the chair while they prepped the teeth for the crowns.  Im lucky after all those years that was all they had to do.

The new dentist is a really nice woman with good bedside manner.  Everyone in that office is pretty awesome.  Will not be neglecting oral health ever again.

/Ill take the shots over gas as I fortunately respond well to them.
//dental tech has really come a long way. I think the crowns were 3D printed at the lab.
2017-01-11 10:55:11 AM  
1 vote:
I hate dentists. Was way sick as a kid. All my teeth are crap from antibiotics damaging the enamel.

Really looking forward to this http://www.sciencealert.com/this-new-drug-can-regenerate-teeth-possibl​y-reducing-the-need-for-man-made-fillings
2017-01-11 10:28:35 AM  
1 vote:
When I was a kid, I had 7 teeth pulled.  One tooth a week for 7 weeks.  By the last tooth, the novocaine had no effect, I guess I became tolerant.  They ended up giving me 4 shots, but nothing, so they said fark it and just yanked with the pliers and I felt everything.  It was a permanent molar, so that thing was in there good.  Took a whole lot of twisting and yanking to get it out.  Dentists are sadists.
2017-01-11 10:12:58 AM  
1 vote:

Silverstaff: For ~25 years I thought dental anaesthetics had no effect on me.

...since I thought I was apparently immune to novocaine and would need to be knocked out to do anything to me.


The anesthetic they are using now is different. Novocaine was used more in the past and it's probable that Novocaine is ineffective for you but Lidocaine does work. I think most dentists transitioned to lidocaine based injections a decade ago. I haven't seen Novocaine used for a long time and the newer injections seem to work better for me.

And if your parents let you have an aspirin and a soda that might have changed how the anesthetic worked for you. For many people (myself included) the combination of aspirin (possibly other NSAIDs) and caffeine can nearly completely block the effectiveness of local anesthetics. I learned that after having aspirin and coffee before going to the dentist as an adult.

Also I have some red hair genetics in my background which means a lot of anesthetics may lack punch. I kind of wonder what the heck my ancestors were eating to make that a useful gene.
Ant
2017-01-11 09:59:38 AM  
1 vote:

OOF: Is it safe?


Is it secret?
2017-01-11 09:44:40 AM  
1 vote:
Old news. Redheads have this issue

/num num
2017-01-11 09:42:32 AM  
1 vote:
Genetic mutation?  I like to think of it as a "Super Power"

The man who felt noall pain, as it were.
2017-01-11 09:42:28 AM  
1 vote:

OOF: Is it safe?


Is what safe?...

While I'm not immune to it, I have a very high tolerance for it. Drives my dentist nuts, the amount of novocaine he uses on me.
2017-01-11 09:37:59 AM  
1 vote:
You know what's fun?  Discovering you're immune to local at the beginning of a vasectomy.

/Uh, no we're not going to continue, thank you very much.
//Knock me the fark out.
///Didn't want to be awake for it anyway
////super glad I live where this covered by socialist health care.
 
Displayed 16 of 16 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter






In Other Media
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report