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(British Psychological Society)   "If you're fairly young and healthy, moderate exercise will probably be more enjoyable than you think"   (digest.bps.org.uk ) divider line
    More: Unlikely, exercise, participants, new exercise habit, new exercise regime, Emotion, lab run, moderate-to-vigorous exercise, Feeling  
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490 clicks; posted to Geek » on 09 Jan 2017 at 4:50 PM (7 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



35 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2017-01-09 12:17:42 PM  
It's more accurate to say that it will be more enjoyable after you complete the workout.  The workout itself is rigorous and tiring and potentially uncomfortable but the feeling afterward is usually good unless you are building up (even then).  When completing a workout one usually has less stress than when they started and it can clear up aches and headaches.
 
2017-01-09 02:49:01 PM  

UberDave: It's more accurate to say that it will be more enjoyable after you complete the workout.  The workout itself is rigorous and tiring and potentially uncomfortable but the feeling afterward is usually good unless you are building up (even then).  When completing a workout one usually has less stress than when they started and it can clear up aches and headaches.


That's basically why I work out.  I sometimes drag my feet going in and it's not usually super fun during (though sometimes I have fun swimming or biking when I can do those), but I always feel much better afterward in a lot of different ways.
 
2017-01-09 04:30:58 PM  
I used to ride the bicycle a quick 10 miles or so after the evening commute. Had to drag may butt out but felt much better that evening.
 
2017-01-09 04:44:14 PM  

UberDave: It's more accurate to say that it will be more enjoyable after you complete the workout.  The workout itself is rigorous and tiring and potentially uncomfortable but the feeling afterward is usually good unless you are building up (even then).  When completing a workout one usually has less stress than when they started and it can clear up aches and headaches.


This one.

Of course, I don't work out to "be in shape", I work out to "be in shape enough to do this one hike, then get fat and lazy again".

/Plus of course, I keep getting soft tissue injuries so...
 
2017-01-09 04:52:16 PM  

meyerkev: UberDave: It's more accurate to say that it will be more enjoyable after you complete the workout.  The workout itself is rigorous and tiring and potentially uncomfortable but the feeling afterward is usually good unless you are building up (even then).  When completing a workout one usually has less stress than when they started and it can clear up aches and headaches.

This one.

Of course, I don't work out to "be in shape", I work out to "be in shape enough to do this one hike, then get fat and lazy again".

/Plus of course, I keep getting soft tissue injuries so...


Masturbation joke?
 
2017-01-09 04:53:15 PM  
No - "working out" sucks. Instead, find something seriously athletic you can do that you actually enjoy and can do on a regular basis. Even better if you have a team so you can have peer pressure getting you there.
 
2017-01-09 05:00:44 PM  
My "workout" involves working outdoors. A hard day of physical labor feels good after a hot shower, a few hours of rest, and a couple beers.

But I'm not especially young or healthy, so those headline doesn't really apply to me.
 
2017-01-09 05:04:28 PM  

meanmutton: No - "working out" sucks. Instead, find something seriously athletic you can do that you actually enjoy and can do on a regular basis. Even better if you have a team so you can have peer pressure getting you there.


Like bowling and curling.
 
2017-01-09 05:08:17 PM  

meanmutton: No - "working out" sucks. Instead, find something seriously athletic you can do that you actually enjoy and can do on a regular basis. Even better if you have a team so you can have peer pressure getting you there.


It's definitely easier to make yourself do it if it's part of getting something accomplished.  Like if it is reasonable to walk or ride to the grocery store, and only need to do a small run.  Luckily hashing requires me to exercise to find beer.  I'm not sure, actually I know, that I wouldn't go out running in 10 degree weather if beer wasn't involved.

/the cold provides natural refrigeration
//but you have to get to it before it freezes
///On-on!
 
2017-01-09 05:14:48 PM  

On-Farkin-On: meyerkev: UberDave: It's more accurate to say that it will be more enjoyable after you complete the workout.  The workout itself is rigorous and tiring and potentially uncomfortable but the feeling afterward is usually good unless you are building up (even then).  When completing a workout one usually has less stress than when they started and it can clear up aches and headaches.

This one.

Of course, I don't work out to "be in shape", I work out to "be in shape enough to do this one hike, then get fat and lazy again".

/Plus of course, I keep getting soft tissue injuries so...

Masturbation joke?


No, I've repeatedly farked up my knee biking and hiking.  (And in one weird case, doing some very light upper body work).  So I went 16 miles up the Mist Trail in September, and then stopped dead.  I've lost 10 pounds and put on 2 belt holes.

/Literally, I'm starting to look for jobs now, and if you want to guarantee that I come work for you, give me a job offer in March and let me start in mid-September.  That way, I can cross off my entire hiking bucket list (Rainier, Half Dome, stay at the bottom of the Grand Canyon, go up Mt. Fuji) before my knee gives out instead of just half of it.
//In practice, the world does not exist to fulfill my every whim and I'm not nearly confident enough to quit my job without having one lined up first, but.
 
2017-01-09 05:16:31 PM  

meanmutton: No - "working out" sucks. Instead, find something seriously athletic you can do that you actually enjoy and can do on a regular basis. Even better if you have a team so you can have peer pressure getting you there.


Opinions vary, but I've found that since moving to a way less intense workout regimen, no more than an hour per session, lots of rest between sets, two/three times per week, the workouts are much less miserable, and the results are much much better.  I think that for me at least, the focus on 'no pain, no gain' led to some really poor training choices because I had the idea that more intensity was always better.  I know plenty of people who thrive on it - but for me it just led to being exhausted all the time.

I'm mostly amazed at how much strength can be gained without any really awful effort (not going to failure, not going back to the gym while still sore from the prior time, etc).  I enjoy it because it just works so well.
 
2017-01-09 05:22:38 PM  
i enjoy my exercise.  6mi walk/jog 2-3 times a week gives me time to think about shiat and enjoy the outdoors

i'd rather gnaw off my own arm than go to a gym though
 
2017-01-09 05:26:14 PM  

Dead for Tax Reasons: i enjoy my exercise.  6mi walk/jog 2-3 times a week gives me time to think about shiat and enjoy the outdoors

i'd rather gnaw off my own arm than go to a gym though


Two words: yoga pants
 
2017-01-09 05:33:44 PM  
However, participants manipulated to expect the lab run to be more enjoyable showed greater increases in positive feelings through the run compared to the negatively manipulated participants; moreover, compared with control participants, they remembered the run as less fatiguing.

Advertising works.
 
2017-01-09 05:35:44 PM  

max_pooper: Dead for Tax Reasons: i enjoy my exercise.  6mi walk/jog 2-3 times a week gives me time to think about shiat and enjoy the outdoors

i'd rather gnaw off my own arm than go to a gym though

Two words: yoga pants


i don't think they'd look that good on me
 
2017-01-09 05:38:59 PM  

draypresct: However, participants manipulated to expect the lab run to be more enjoyable showed greater increases in positive feelings through the run compared to the negatively manipulated participants; moreover, compared with control participants, they remembered the run as less fatiguing.

Advertising works.


"Except on me! I'm immune and above all that bullshiat!"  says almost everyone, incorrectly.
 
2017-01-09 05:43:53 PM  

max_pooper: Dead for Tax Reasons: i enjoy my exercise.  6mi walk/jog 2-3 times a week gives me time to think about shiat and enjoy the outdoors

i'd rather gnaw off my own arm than go to a gym though

Two words: yoga pants


Whereas if you go hiking on a hot day all the hot girls are in bikini tops and short shorts and all the hot guys are shirtless.

Which I'd say beats yoga pants.

/Especially once you've added on the filter for "People who were willing to hike 2-3 miles to get here" to the general attractiveness spectrum.
 
2017-01-09 05:50:22 PM  
renjiveda.files.wordpress.com
Release the Endorphin! (an actual addictive natural substance)
 
2017-01-09 05:51:19 PM  

meyerkev: On-Farkin-On: meyerkev: UberDave: It's more accurate to say that it will be more enjoyable after you complete the workout.  The workout itself is rigorous and tiring and potentially uncomfortable but the feeling afterward is usually good unless you are building up (even then).  When completing a workout one usually has less stress than when they started and it can clear up aches and headaches.

This one.

Of course, I don't work out to "be in shape", I work out to "be in shape enough to do this one hike, then get fat and lazy again".

/Plus of course, I keep getting soft tissue injuries so...

Masturbation joke?

No, I've repeatedly farked up my knee biking and hiking.  (And in one weird case, doing some very light upper body work).  So I went 16 miles up the Mist Trail in September, and then stopped dead.  I've lost 10 pounds and put on 2 belt holes.

/Literally, I'm starting to look for jobs now, and if you want to guarantee that I come work for you, give me a job offer in March and let me start in mid-September.  That way, I can cross off my entire hiking bucket list (Rainier, Half Dome, stay at the bottom of the Grand Canyon, go up Mt. Fuji) before my knee gives out instead of just half of it.
//In practice, the world does not exist to fulfill my every whim and I'm not nearly confident enough to quit my job without having one lined up first, but.


Shiattons of squats man....and stairs/bleachers...and use weights.  I tore a meniscus when I was young.  I'm still able to run, hike, and carry significant weight in the back country even though I've never had my meniscus operated on.

Years ago, when I let myself get out of shape, I started working out again but did mostly upper body.  I thought I would climb Elbert.  I made it but my knees were worthless for about a week.  It hurt to walk.  I spent a year building my legs back up to their former glory and haven't had a knee issue since.
 
2017-01-09 05:59:12 PM  

Jster422: Opinions vary, but I've found that since moving to a way less intense workout regimen, no more than an hour per session, lots of rest between sets, two/three times per week, the workouts are much less miserable, and the results are much much better.  I think that for me at least, the focus on 'no pain, no gain' led to some really poor training choices because I had the idea that more intensity was always better.  I know plenty of people who thrive on it - but for me it just led to being exhausted all the time.

I'm mostly amazed at how much strength can be gained without any really awful effort (not going to failure, not going back to the gym while still sore from the prior time, etc).  I enjoy it because it just works so well.


This. In my 20s I had lost 65 pounds by beating my body senseless with workouts and running a ton. In the last few years I put back on 40 pounds or so.

In my 40s now and that same approach just wasn't happening. Last February I signed on with a personal trainer / nutritionist. He tweaked my diet a little bit, and gives me workouts to do each week. Only three days per week, takes about an hour with plenty of rest intervals.  Two other days it's just 20 minutes of intervals. Something like 30 seconds of burpees, 30 seconds rest, 30 seconds of jumping rope, 30 seconds rest and so on. I lost the 40 in 6 months, and I'm lifting more weight than I was in my 20s.
 
2017-01-09 06:01:46 PM  
At 38, I'm just trying to keep it together for my kids (1 and 4) so that I can show them all the cool stuff out there once they're old enough to experience it.  I used to spend autumn nights hanging from Yosemite big walls and winter days summiting 14k'-ers.  Now most of my exercise consists of jogging to and from the office.  Stupid building security won't even let me take the stairs to my floor.  I haven't had a climbing gym membership in over five years.

My capacity for resistance training is like a sad joke compared to just a few years ago.  And endurance days (90min+ on the move), which used to be synonymous with the weekend, are limited to five or six precious days per year.  The physical isn't as enjoyable because my body finally learned to fight back, and the chemical (endorphin) isn't as intense because the workouts are mellower, but the mental is still wonderful.  Those 3 or 4 hours per week feel like the only time I do anything for myself.  I don't worry about debt, obsess over the ways I'm failing to live up to the competing demands of parenthood, marriage, and work, or lament my self-identity irretrievably slipping into the past.

What the hell was my point...  Oh yeah, exercise is awesome.  Step #1 is to find something you enjoy doing, whether it's Latin dance, pickle ball, or whatever.  Step #2 is to make some friends doing it.  Step #3 is to do it regularly enough to progress (and to reap the benefits of improved physical fitness and brain health).  It may become the high point of your routine.
 
2017-01-09 06:26:06 PM  

UberDave: It's more accurate to say that it will be more enjoyable after you complete the workout.  The workout itself is rigorous and tiring and potentially uncomfortable but the feeling afterward is usually good unless you are building up (even then).  When completing a workout one usually has less stress than when they started and it can clear up aches and headaches.


I remember asking my dad, who jogged every day about an hour from the time he was 8 to 78, if he liked running. "Christ no!" He said. "But I like how I feel afterwards."
 
2017-01-09 06:28:54 PM  

UberDave: meyerkev: On-Farkin-On: meyerkev: UberDave: It's more accurate to say that it will be more enjoyable after you complete the workout.  The workout itself is rigorous and tiring and potentially uncomfortable but the feeling afterward is usually good unless you are building up (even then).  When completing a workout one usually has less stress than when they started and it can clear up aches and headaches.

This one.

Of course, I don't work out to "be in shape", I work out to "be in shape enough to do this one hike, then get fat and lazy again".

/Plus of course, I keep getting soft tissue injuries so...

Masturbation joke?

No, I've repeatedly farked up my knee biking and hiking.  (And in one weird case, doing some very light upper body work).  So I went 16 miles up the Mist Trail in September, and then stopped dead.  I've lost 10 pounds and put on 2 belt holes.

/Literally, I'm starting to look for jobs now, and if you want to guarantee that I come work for you, give me a job offer in March and let me start in mid-September.  That way, I can cross off my entire hiking bucket list (Rainier, Half Dome, stay at the bottom of the Grand Canyon, go up Mt. Fuji) before my knee gives out instead of just half of it.
//In practice, the world does not exist to fulfill my every whim and I'm not nearly confident enough to quit my job without having one lined up first, but.

Shiattons of squats man....and stairs/bleachers...and use weights.  I tore a meniscus when I was young.  I'm still able to run, hike, and carry significant weight in the back country even though I've never had my meniscus operated on.

Years ago, when I let myself get out of shape, I started working out again but did mostly upper body.  I thought I would climb Elbert.  I made it but my knees were worthless for about a week.  It hurt to walk.  I spent a year building my legs back up to their former glory and haven't had a knee issue since.


Able was I ere I saw Elbert
 
2017-01-09 06:50:37 PM  

max_pooper: Dead for Tax Reasons: i enjoy my exercise.  6mi walk/jog 2-3 times a week gives me time to think about shiat and enjoy the outdoors

i'd rather gnaw off my own arm than go to a gym though

Two words: yoga pants


I've seen that go horribly wrong. Horribly wrong.
 
2017-01-09 06:56:28 PM  
If you are getting up there a little and have never exercised, you are never going to be able to start, and you're never to be in shape, and you're going to die. I'm sorry.
 
2017-01-09 07:42:48 PM  
They told a group of men that the exercise was easy and they'd enjoy it. Those guys then reported that it wasn't bad and they liked it.

This was a group of youngish men all fudging the truth to save face. Breathing hard, beat to hell, claiming "it was nothing, I could do double that."
 
2017-01-09 08:32:58 PM  

cryinoutloud: If you are getting up there a little and have never exercised, you are never going to be able to start, and you're never to be in shape, and you're going to die. I'm sorry.


Even if you start exercise at 5 years of age, continue throughout your life you still die.
You might leave a better looking corpse, but that's all.
 
2017-01-09 08:38:37 PM  

UberDave: It's more accurate to say that it will be more enjoyable after you complete the workout.  The workout itself is rigorous and tiring and potentially uncomfortable but the feeling afterward is usually good unless you are building up (even then).  When completing a workout one usually has less stress than when they started and it can clear up aches and headaches.


Lies. I had a personal trainer for a couple of years back when I was in my twenties. I hated exercising, and the only good feeling afterwards was "Thank god that's over". Which was quickly overtaken by everything aching. Never experienced anything like an endorphin rush or whatnot.

Was I stronger? Sure, but since I don't need strength in any non-exercise capacity, it was pointless. Was I healthier? Probably, but I didn't feel any different from when I didn't exercise. So I made myself feel miserable exercising so.... I could feel miserable doing more exercise.
 
2017-01-09 08:56:32 PM  
I'm 48, so definitely not on the youngish side.  But I'm still in good shape, and run 3 miles several times a week.   Plus regular workouts and yoga* on the side.

That said, I hate it.  I hate it the idea before I go, I hate it while I'm doing it, and I'm just relieved when it's over.  The only reason I keep doing it is because I'm married to a version of Captain America, (who, in my defense, is 11 years younger than me) and I'll be goddamned if he outruns me in the next marathon.

Being being hypercompetitive is the only thing keeping in shape.

*no, I do not wear yoga pants
 
2017-01-09 09:10:27 PM  

trialpha: UberDave: It's more accurate to say that it will be more enjoyable after you complete the workout.  The workout itself is rigorous and tiring and potentially uncomfortable but the feeling afterward is usually good unless you are building up (even then).  When completing a workout one usually has less stress than when they started and it can clear up aches and headaches.

Lies. I had a personal trainer for a couple of years back when I was in my twenties. I hated exercising, and the only good feeling afterwards was "Thank god that's over". Which was quickly overtaken by everything aching. Never experienced anything like an endorphin rush or whatnot.

Was I stronger? Sure, but since I don't need strength in any non-exercise capacity, it was pointless. Was I healthier? Probably, but I didn't feel any different from when I didn't exercise. So I made myself feel miserable exercising so.... I could feel miserable doing more exercise.


My problem is that I can either hurt all the time, or I can feel like a pile of sludge all the time.

Which means that I hurt all the time until I injure myself and then feel like a pile of sludge until I heal.
 
2017-01-09 09:14:12 PM  

docpeteyJ: I'm 48, so definitely not on the youngish side.  But I'm still in good shape, and run 3 miles several times a week.   Plus regular workouts and yoga* on the side.

That said, I hate it.  I hate it the idea before I go, I hate it while I'm doing it, and I'm just relieved when it's over.  The only reason I keep doing it is because I'm married to a version of Captain America, (who, in my defense, is 11 years younger than me) and I'll be goddamned if he outruns me in the next marathon.

Being being hypercompetitive is the only thing keeping in shape.

*no, I do not wear yoga pants


Jesus that last sentence of mine was a complete shiatfest.  "Being hypercompetitive is the only thing keeping ME in shape."

Christ, I need either more coffee or more booze, I'm not sure which.
 
2017-01-10 06:10:04 AM  

Herr Flick's Revenge: You might leave a better looking corpse, but that's all.


Having gotten some additional mileage out of the corps is nice as well.
 
2017-01-10 08:19:17 AM  
For me, the most important part was to make it part of my daily routine.  Wake up at 5, browse the overnight news, workout, shower, get my daughter on the bus, and start working.  On the weekend, it's grocery shopping and errands after the shower, but still -- I do it like clockwork, no exceptions.

It also helps that I don't do the same routine every day.  I mix  up walking, cardio on a stationary bike, free weights, and hiking (hiking being my favorite).

At almost 52 now, I really start to feel it when I travel and can't do anything other than walking.  Walking is good, of course, but I start to feel achy by the end of a week's vacation.
 
6 days ago  
The only reason I exercise is because of the vague hope that having some semblance of muscle and firmness will make me sexually appealing.
 
6 days ago  

docpeteyJ: I'm 48, so definitely not on the youngish side.  But I'm still in good shape, and run 3 miles several times a week.   Plus regular workouts and yoga* on the side.

That said, I hate it.  I hate it the idea before I go, I hate it while I'm doing it, and I'm just relieved when it's over.  The only reason I keep doing it is because I'm married to a version of Captain America, (who, in my defense, is 11 years younger than me) and I'll be goddamned if he outruns me in the next marathon.

Being being hypercompetitive is the only thing keeping in shape.

*no, I do not wear yoga pants


I felt similarly, at least about the running - until I switched over to the 'Primal Endurance' model - now, I've taken the winter months to focus on strength, so a full assessment will have to wait a while, but the short version is that you make sure to stay below a given HR threshold (based on your age) which is supposed to represent keeping your activity Aerobic.

Whether it delivers the amazing health benefits touted in the book or not, I've found that my runs have gone from miserable to quite pleasant, and I no longer get the recurring ankle/calf pain that used to regularly sideline my training.

Over a couple of months of 2/3 runs per week, I did see improvement in how quickly my HR would drop back down, though I was still having to jog a minute/walk a minute in order to keep my HR low - but my time per mile was starting to drop, and I think I'll be close to being able to maintain a jogging pace at a low HR once the weather improves a bit.
 
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