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(Some Melancholy Dane)   400-year-old original printing of "Hamlet," one of 19 known to exist, up for auction. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern unavailable for comment   (news.findlaw.com) divider line 124
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7808 clicks; posted to Main » on 14 Apr 2004 at 1:09 AM (10 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2004-04-13 07:40:10 PM
Anybody seen Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead? Pretty funny version of the play from their point of view, with Tim Robbins and Gary Oldham playing titular roles.
 
2004-04-13 07:42:53 PM
The flash version is much better. 5.8 Megs, but worth it.

http://www.digitalsmackdown.com/film/l33t2.html
 
2004-04-13 07:49:47 PM
Christie's has estimated its worth between $1.5 and $2 million.

The play's the thing, to cash the coffers of a king.
 
2004-04-13 08:32:53 PM
excellent headline, submitter.

/life inside a box is better than no life at all. i expect.
 
2004-04-13 08:35:11 PM
Pretty funny version of the play from their point of view, with Tim Robbins and Gary Oldham playing titular roles.

I think Tom Stoppard directed the film version, too. That would explain why it was such a good movie translation. (And though I think Tim Robbins was too busy making Bull Durham at the time, Tim Roth did a good job filling in for him.)
 
2004-04-13 09:56:31 PM
HumbleGod: Wow, imagine confusing two actors, both named Tim, both last names beginning with the "rah" sound. I stand humbly corrected in your presence, Lord.
 
2004-04-14 01:12:44 AM
To buy, or not to buy. That is the question.

/obvious
 
2004-04-14 01:14:05 AM
Submitter deserves a trophy full of "steak-ums"
 
2004-04-14 01:14:40 AM
my dad was looking through a book a few months ago that had all the paintings from Charles M. Russell in it except for one. that one is in my moms bedroom which we believe to be the original, but havent had checked out yet
 
2004-04-14 01:17:12 AM
OK, I know this isn't a survey thread, but best movie version of Hamlet -- what's your opinion? I say Kenneth Branagh's.
 
2004-04-14 01:17:20 AM
Tom Stoppard really is a legitimate genius. The man gave us Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead and Brazil. Need you more proof?
 
2004-04-14 01:17:35 AM
They're unavailable for comment because they're dead
 
2004-04-14 01:17:52 AM
"Anybody seen Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead?"

It was difficult. The only VHS copy my college-town had for rent in the early 90's kept getting stolen. That, and Monty Python and the Holy Grail...
 
2004-04-14 01:17:55 AM
There are more things in heaven and fark, Horatio,
Than are dreamt of in your philosophy
 
2004-04-14 01:18:57 AM
michaeltrout:

Branagh's is great, but I haven't seen any of the older, more "classic" versions. But as long as we can all agree that Mel Gibson's was terrible, I think that is enough.

/noting that Mel Gibson likes to martyr himself almost as much onscreen as in real life.
 
2004-04-14 01:19:36 AM
Oh, my god. She had Macbeth too? This is unbelievable. I can't believe it's up for private auction. This belongs in a museum along with the other eighteen copies. This is history. Is it wrong to be envious?
 
2004-04-14 01:20:00 AM
{Insert eBay "BUY IT NOW" joke here}
 
2004-04-14 01:21:08 AM
What I loved about RGAD was the snappy dialog; let your attention wander for a second, and you miss a great line. Makes watching it over more fun than most movies.

Any recommendations for similar movies; ones where the plot is really subservient to the character's interactions? (Maybe Bogie+Bacall?)
 
2004-04-14 01:21:25 AM
2004-04-14 01:18:57 AM kronicfeld

Branagh's is great, but I haven't seen any of the older, more "classic" versions. But as long as we can all agree that Mel Gibson's was terrible, I think that is enough.

I liked Brannagh's Much Ado Abuot Nothing, but I haven't actually gotten up the stanima to watch Brannagh's Hamlet yet. I'm still pissed at him for cheating on Emma Thompson.

Gibson's version did suck ass though.
 
2004-04-14 01:22:20 AM
Didn't RTFA, but I just want to see this go on ebay. That would be awesome.
 
2004-04-14 01:22:34 AM
kronicfeld
Gibson's really sucked, which was disappointing because Franco Zeffereli is a good director. I may get nailed on this, but I also though Laurence Olivier's sucked too.
 
2004-04-14 01:24:03 AM
"What I loved about RGAD was the snappy dialog; let your attention wander for a second, and you miss a great line. Makes watching it over more fun than most movies."

"England? I don't believe in it."

"A conspiracy of cartographers, then?"
 
2004-04-14 01:24:16 AM
wydok
Reserve a Saturday and do it. It's really worth it.
 
2004-04-14 01:24:23 AM
Anyone wanna bet on a coin toss? I get to be Rosencrantz.
 
2004-04-14 01:24:50 AM
2004-04-14 01:22:34 AM michaeltrout

kronicfeld
Gibson's really sucked, which was disappointing because Franco Zeffereli is a good director.


Did you see Zeffereli's Romeo and Juliet? Ugh! I had to suffer through that in both 9th grade and college. I hate to say it, but I like the DeCrapio version better.
 
2004-04-14 01:25:41 AM
best movie version of Hamlet -- what's your opinion?

I vote Zeffirelli's version.. gotta love the incest twist, man. And Helena Bonham Carter was a great Ophelia, says I.
 
2004-04-14 01:25:43 AM
Henchman,

I ran lights at a theater for about 8 shows and another four rehersals of Rosencrantz & Guildenstern are dead. Since then, I've been dying to see the movie... But Buena Vista isn't producing it for Region 1 or VHS right now, and good used copies are an arm and a leg.

Buena Vista / Rosencrantz & Guildenstern are Dead
 
2004-04-14 01:25:46 AM
Laurence Olivier's Hamlet is still my preferred choice. Branagh's was good, well acted, and I thought his choice of setting in the 18th century was nice. But Olivier's performance is iconic.
 
2004-04-14 01:26:19 AM
michaeltrout

OK, I know this isn't a survey thread, but best movie version of Hamlet -- what's your opinion? I say Kenneth Branagh's.


It was certainly an interesting time period to depict Hamlet in. Looked like it was set in the late 18th, early 19th century. Hardly what Shakespeare had in mind, but executed quite well. I would have to say that it was my favorite rendition of Hamlet, and I'm thankful they didn't try to create a modernized version starring Leonardo DiCrappio.

I'm still waiting for a good movie version of The Tempest, or is there one already?
 
2004-04-14 01:28:30 AM
As comic book collector (now getting ready to sell some of his stuff ;P), I'd like to say how cool this would be to own.

One of only nineteen in existence. And the only one in private hands. Hot damn.
 
2004-04-14 01:28:37 AM
michaeltrout:

I've only seen segments of Olivier's (less than a whole act in toto), but I liked what I saw. We were forced to watch Gibson's in English. That was absolutely brutal.

For an actor-director's film version of a piece of classic literature that doesn't fall flat on its face, check out Gary Sinise's Of Mice and Men.
 
2004-04-14 01:28:40 AM
methinks y'all need to look past Mel Gibson being in Zeffirelli's version. I noticed somebody called it "Gibson's version." Please.
 
2004-04-14 01:31:18 AM
wydok

Did you see Zeffereli's Romeo and Juliet? Ugh! I had to suffer through that in both 9th grade and college. I hate to say it, but I like the DeCrapio version better.

I liked both versions. I had a major thing for Olivia Hussey for a while after I saw Zefferelli's (granted, I was like 12). And I think Luhrman's version was the best "modernization" of Shakespeare that's been done, period.
 
2004-04-14 01:31:18 AM
2004-04-14 01:26:19 AM LincolnLogolas

It was certainly an interesting time period to depict Hamlet in. Looked like it was set in the late 18th, early 19th century.

Ian McKellan did a version if Richard III set in something akin to Nazi Germany. It was quite different, but very well done.

And then there was Ten Things I Hate About You, but we won't get into that now :)
 
2004-04-14 01:31:44 AM
"This is much rarer," Wahlgren said, explaining that the last time the second authorized quarto edition of "Hamlet" was for sale, in the 1940s, it was Lady Eccles, then known as Mary Hyde, who purchased it.

Nice grammar.
 
2004-04-14 01:32:20 AM
The potent poison quite o'ergrows my spirit...the rest...is underpants...

whoops...wrong thread...
 
2004-04-14 01:33:00 AM
Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead is boring and stupid.
 
2004-04-14 01:33:03 AM
Every version has hints of incest. Branagh makes it somewhat obvious (throws Gertrude on the bed and lays on top of her). Zefferelli just kicked it up a notch, IMHO. Although Helena Bonham Carter was pretty good (but not better than Kate Winslet, again IMHO). And Romeo + Juliet sucked.

Laurence Oliver's version sucked because someone forgot to turn the fog machine off.

Adam Sandler's performance in Billy Madison also ranks up there.
 
2004-04-14 01:33:36 AM
Speaking of Branagh, his Henry V is a must see. Not that most people need much urging, but the speech before the Battle of Agincourt will get the meekest rocketing off their couch to go stomp some French heads. And watch the scene after the battle as he carries the dead boy...easily the longest and most complex single shot I've ever seen in a movie.

This story shall the good man teach his son;
And Crispin's Crispian shall ne'er go by,
From this day until the ending of the world,
but we in it shall be remember'd;
We few, we happy few, we band of brothers...
 
2004-04-14 01:34:00 AM
middleoftheday:

I'd like to look past Gibson, but I think he crudded up many of the scenes he was in, and one bad performance can pull down the whole production. I call it "Gibson's" derisively, because it was really his presence that kept it from being good, not Zefferelli's directing.
 
2004-04-14 01:35:53 AM
BTW, I've never seen any movie version of the Tempest, so I dunno if there's a good one out there.
 
2004-04-14 01:37:44 AM
vossiewulf
Hold your manhood cheap, whilst I speak. =P
 
2004-04-14 01:38:54 AM
But as long as we can all agree that Mel Gibson's was terrible, I think that is enough.

You are insane.

People like Branagh because they are told that they're supposed to like him if they are properly "cultured". But he hasn't done any significant Shakespeare since "Henry V". In point of fact, his "Hamlet" was a steaming pantload; a cold and souless portrayal that had me cheering for Claudius. Like it or not, Gibson's "Hamlet" nailed the interpretation like no other version and imbued it with the energetic spirit it had lost when the Freudians added all that Oedipal malarky. Gibson (and Zeffirelli) understood that Hamlet was an action story with an active hero -- not some some moody idle-rich Nancy-boy.
 
2004-04-14 01:39:41 AM
There are movie versions of The Tempest, but nothing "professional." The one I've seen (parts of, again in English class) was basically a filmed stage performance (Richard Burton was in it, I think) and even the stage performance wasn't really terribly impressive.
 
2004-04-14 01:40:09 AM
Branagh's version was the best that I've seen, which doesn't say much. I've only seen it and Gibson's version of assitude.

What a great way to spend a month of English IV.
 
2004-04-14 01:40:31 AM
i played rosencrantz in a production of R&G Are Dead last year. thankfully, no pumpkin pants
 
2004-04-14 01:41:19 AM
RosenCarl and GuildenLenny.
 
2004-04-14 01:42:42 AM
kronicfeld

Derek Jarman did a version of the Tempest that was very well received. Personally I think it's an incomprehensible director's take on an incomprehensible play but at least it's better than titus andronicus.
 
2004-04-14 01:43:31 AM
Are you serious, RavinDave?!!

Hamlet's downfall is inaction, it is the very essence of Hamlet that he be moody and slow to act. It's what he spends half of the play doing! It's why he doesn't kill Claudius in Act III. It's why Ophelia can't understand him. It's why Laertes is Hamlet's foil. What on earth are you talking about?
 
2004-04-14 01:45:38 AM
* ahem *

I ask to be or not to be, A rogue or peasant slave is what
you see;
A boy who loved his mothers knee, And so I ask
to be or not to be.
So heres my plea, I beg of you, And say you see a little hope for me.
To fight or flee, to fight or flee, I ask myself to be or not to be
 
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