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(National Geographic)   See what happens when one smart guy overpowers another smart guy. Vulcan disappears   ( news.nationalgeographic.com) divider line
    More: Spiffy, Vulcan, Newton's laws, And Deciphered The Universe, Paris Observatory, general relativity, Science Writing, mercury, theory of relativities  
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3123 clicks; posted to Geek » on 05 Nov 2015 at 11:39 AM (1 year ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



21 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2015-11-05 09:18:18 AM  
Go home Mercury, you're drunk.
 
2015-11-05 09:43:00 AM  
I blame Spock.
 
2015-11-05 10:42:33 AM  
Read that as The Vatican.

/ wish I was drunk
 
2015-11-05 10:48:38 AM  

bdub77: I blame Spock.


Actually, it was this guys fault:

thegeeksftw.com
 
2015-11-05 11:06:08 AM  
38.media.tumblr.com
 
2015-11-05 11:09:47 AM  

DjangoStonereaver: bdub77: I blame Spock.

Actually, it was this guys fault:

[thegeeksftw.com image 800x604]


His was an unconventional portrayal of Einstein, but I found his excitement at being able to explain how Vulcan didn't exist to be true to the person.
 
2015-11-05 11:50:09 AM  
Nat Geo? News Corp link.

Nope.
 
2015-11-05 11:53:00 AM  
That was a big Vulcan mistake.
 
2015-11-05 12:18:50 PM  

Trumps Hair: Nat Geo? News Corp link.

Nope.


Stigginit ?
 
2015-11-05 12:28:49 PM  
It's a wonderful example of how absence of evidence is in fact evidence of absence.
 
2015-11-05 12:40:55 PM  
Spock, I have something I'd like you to see.
 
2015-11-05 12:42:57 PM  
A NASA Photo of Kepler-10?

news.nationalgeographic.com

Wow, how did we get a probe 564 light years out there so fast? When did we get ansible communications technology?
 
2015-11-05 12:48:39 PM  
Wow, and you guys expect me to believe climate change?  GG, guys.
 
2015-11-05 12:52:34 PM  
Space-time curvature. It's a biatch.
 
2015-11-05 12:53:53 PM  
C'mon y'all, less Vul-CAN'T more Vul-CAN.
 
2015-11-05 12:58:21 PM  
You know who else came fro the planet Vulcan?


s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com
 
2015-11-05 02:08:23 PM  

Trumps Hair: Nat Geo? News Corp link.

Nope.


This.
 
2015-11-05 03:02:17 PM  

quo vadimus: Trumps Hair: Nat Geo? News Corp link.

Nope.

This.


THIS. Owned by Fox? No clicky. Although I'm sure I've seen plenty of their movies and TV shows so not sure why I'm all uppity about it now and yes that makes me a hypocrite.
 
2015-11-05 04:00:07 PM  
I know they're trying to target a math illeterate audience but it would have been nice if there was even a remotely sensible description of the wobble and how it pertained to Newtonian and Einsteinian physics.
 
2015-11-05 04:44:53 PM  

Russ1642: I know they're trying to target a math illeterate audience but it would have been nice if there was even a remotely sensible description of the wobble and how it pertained to Newtonian and Einsteinian physics.


It's not a "wobble" like most people think.

Essentially, most orbits aren't exactly circular, and so there's an aphelion and perihelion.  These points (furthest from and nearest to the sun, respectively) "rotate" around the sun over successive orbits as other planets exert gravitational force on any individual planet, but all of these shifts can be calculated using classical Newtonian gravity.

Except Mercury.  Mercury has an extremely elliptical orbit - far more so than any other planet - and is also extremely close to the sun at perihelion.  Repeated observations and calculations over 150 years or so, finally compiled in the 1800s, led astronomers to determine that the expected shift in Mercury's aphelion (based on the effects from the other planets) was off by what was observed by a certain amount (finally determined to be 43", a little less than 3/4 of a degree, every orbit).  In the understanding of the time, that meant another source of gravity had to be out there - hence Vulcan.  Note that this assumption had proved to be correct with Uranus and Neptune at around the same time.

What relativity does is say that the sun is *so* massive that its gravity actually curves space-time near it, and so the travel path of Mercury as it orbits (especially at perihelion, the closest approach to the sun) isn't quite the flat ellipse we expect.  The correction that this gravitational curvature allows for is exactly the amount that Mercury deviates from Newtonian calculations.  It only really affects Mercury because Mercury's orbit is 1) *so* elliptical and 2) *so* close to the sun; for every other planet, the effect is minimal.

/Not a rocket scientist (yet) or astronomer, but a hobbyist
 
2015-11-05 04:46:50 PM  
This headline was better than my "fully armed and operational Albert Einstein" headline?

/Either I'm drunk or the administrator is.

//Oh wait, this is Fark.  We are all drunk.
 
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