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(CNN)   60-ft long asteroid to pass "very close" to Earth on Sunday. In layman's terms, WE ARE ALL GOING TO DIE   (cnn.com ) divider line
    More: Cool, Earth Sunday, asteroids, Earth, satellite orbit, Catalina Sky Survey, amateur astronomers  
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2246 clicks; posted to Geek » on 04 Sep 2014 at 4:10 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-09-04 01:59:26 PM  
i1182.photobucket.com
 
2014-09-04 02:05:07 PM  
Story says nothing about how close or how large it is. No wonder that f*cking network is going down the tubes. Journalism, MFer! Do you speak it?
 
2014-09-04 02:14:34 PM  
www.thefancarpet.com

"I got this, y'all."
 
2014-09-04 02:37:07 PM  

i75.photobucket.com


You're all gonna die!

 
2014-09-04 02:46:50 PM  
About freeking time.
 
2014-09-04 03:55:30 PM  
i1182.photobucket.com

Y'know. For future reference. >.>
 
2014-09-04 04:14:54 PM  

Captain Steroid: [i1182.photobucket.com image 781x1024]

Y'know. For future reference. >.>


I'm relatively certain that CJD isn't very common, and in no way should deter you from eating delicious brains. Anyways, one won't survive very long in a post-apocalypse, and the incubation period for those prions is at least 20 years.
 
2014-09-04 04:20:38 PM  

Sin_City_Superhero: [www.thefancarpet.com image 401x615]

"I got this, y'all."


Why is his NASA patch all farked up?
 
2014-09-04 04:20:59 PM  
We're all....DOOMED!

img.fark.net
 
2014-09-04 04:23:16 PM  

LucklessWonder: Sin_City_Superhero: [www.thefancarpet.com image 401x615]

"I got this, y'all."

Why is his NASA patch all farked up?


It's a mirror selfie because he hasn't figured out how to turn his cellphone around and press the button while looking at the lens.
 
2014-09-04 04:24:42 PM  
Why is his NASA patch all farked up?

.enilemit etanretlA
 
2014-09-04 04:24:56 PM  
I'll let you in on a little secret. Asteroids the size of a house hit the atmosphere with the force of a small atomic bomb and explode. This happens on a regular basis and nobody dies because the USA and the former Soviet Union doesn't jump to conclusions and mistake them for atomic bombs.

The military released a lot of old data to astronomers some years ago, and this sort of thing is now part of the data used to calculate that your chances of dying by asteroid impact is about 1 in 9,000. That might seem low, but it includes the really rare and really big impacts that happen only once in a few hundred million or billion years.

If one asteroid big enough to wipe out civilization (and say, 10 billion people) can be expected to hit the Earth in the next million years, that is an average of 10,000 people a year, which is quite close to 1 in 9,000 a year. See how that works?

Well, in reality almost no one has ever been hit by a meteorite and we don't know of any people who have been killed by one. A dog did get killed by a meteorite in Egypt over a century ago. But that's all we know about.

That big explosion in Russia, the Tungusta Event, may have killed some natives but Russia didn't really have a count of the natives or any data on their mortality, so it is assumed to have flattened thousands of square miles of forest without killing anybody.

A 60-foot asteroid would be a bit bigger than the average house-sized asteroid but it would have to hit a high-flying airplane to have much chance of killing a human. Worry about crossing the street. You do it a lot more often with a much higher risk.

I am reading a book about the stories and numbers on death at the moment. Statisticians use a measure called the micro-mort (one chance in a million of dying). Smoking will cost you hundreds or even thousands of micro-morts. Asteroids, at 1 in 9,000 per year, would cost you about 111 micro-morts. That`s roughly one third of a micro-mort per day. Take a look at a cigarette. That's more deadly than the film  Armageddon. Unless, of course, you watch it.
 
2014-09-04 04:26:19 PM  
 
2014-09-04 04:32:17 PM  

Dibs on the Sunsword!

 
2014-09-04 04:33:57 PM  
It's a 60 foot asteroid. That isn't an extinction causing hit even if it were going to hit us.

Now IF it hit Earth and IF it did so in a populated area, then yeah it could wipe out a small city/town, but not a whole country much less our civilization.
 
2014-09-04 04:34:01 PM  

New Farkin User Name: Captain Steroid: [i1182.photobucket.com image 781x1024]

Y'know. For future reference. >.>

I'm relatively certain that CJD isn't very common, and in no way should deter you from eating delicious brains. Anyways, one won't survive very long in a post-apocalypse, and the incubation period for those prions is at least 20 years.


IIRC, there are 300 deaths a year from CJD in the USA. That's roughly one per million, or a micro-mort. Convenient. This is in addition to cases contracted from eating beef or for that matter squirrel brains.

Yes, people eat squirrel brains and get Mad Squirrel Disease*. Squirrel meat is popular with a certain class of people, mainly Southerners. It is said to be very tasty, although I have never had any.

I have had rabbit and like it. Tastes a lot like duck or lamb. My uncles are woodsmen and have had porcupine, which is very easy to catch but harder to skin (not that hard if you know what you are doing) and beaver tail, which is a great delicacy. Porcupines are very tender because they never, ever run away from anything, even eighteen-wheelers. Of course, you wouldn't want to eat one that failed to run away from an eighteen-wheeler unless you like jerky. Well, even if you like jerky. But in principle, porcupines are the lost man's best choice for a quick meal unless they are too far up a tree for you to down them.

*My advice: never die a comical and unlikely death. Unless your aim is to be eulogized by Farkers.
 
2014-09-04 04:39:47 PM  

mongbiohazard: It's a 60 foot asteroid. That isn't an extinction causing hit even if it were going to hit us.

Now IF it hit Earth and IF it did so in a populated area, then yeah it could wipe out a small city/town, but not a whole country much less our civilization.

Velocity is also a factor (literally) in the energy of the impact. A 60' asteroid from the asteroid belt is one thing. A 60' comet from tne Kuiper Belt is another. A 60' comet from the Oort Cloud would be quite devastating indeed.
 
2014-09-04 04:40:52 PM  

Captain Steroid: [i1182.photobucket.com image 781x1024]

Y'know. For future reference. >.>


http://www.churchofeuthanasia.org/e-sermons/butcher.html
 
2014-09-04 04:46:25 PM  
I have no comment about the asteroid, but I do like the new CNN logo.
 
2014-09-04 04:47:53 PM  
What's with the changing CNN tags?
Has this been covered? I like the Wolf Blitzer tag, though.
 
2014-09-04 04:56:06 PM  
60 footer... so a nice fireball but not much else?
 
2014-09-04 05:09:14 PM  

Speaker2Animals: Story says nothing about how close or how large it is. No wonder that f*cking network is going down the tubes. Journalism, MFer! Do you speak it?


Second sentence: "The space rock is estimated to be 60 feet (18 meters) long."

The first caption, which automatically loads: "The space rock will come within one-tenth the distance from Earth to the moon, but it is not expected to threaten the planet."

So... yea...
 
2014-09-04 05:15:21 PM  

Car_Ramrod: Speaker2Animals: Story says nothing about how close or how large it is. No wonder that f*cking network is going down the tubes. Journalism, MFer! Do you speak it?

Second sentence: "The space rock is estimated to be 60 feet (18 meters) long."

The first caption, which automatically loads: "The space rock will come within one-tenth the distance from Earth to the moon, but it is not expected to threaten the planet."

So... yea...


Well, captions aren't an appropriate place for information that doesn't directly describe the picture. That kind of information should have been in the article.
 
2014-09-04 05:24:26 PM  
Rattrap has a Fark handle?
 
2014-09-04 05:35:42 PM  
c1.staticflickr.com
 
2014-09-04 05:39:19 PM  

Car_Ramrod: Speaker2Animals: Story says nothing about how close or how large it is. No wonder that f*cking network is going down the tubes. Journalism, MFer! Do you speak it?

Second sentence: "The space rock is estimated to be 60 feet (18 meters) long."

The first caption, which automatically loads: "The space rock will come within one-tenth the distance from Earth to the moon, but it is not expected to threaten the planet."

So... yea...


I was into second sentences before it was cool....
 
2014-09-04 05:48:04 PM  

Captain Steroid: [i1182.photobucket.com image 781x1024]

Y'know. For future reference. >.>


Is that handy chart for the zombies or us?
 
2014-09-04 05:59:00 PM  

Car_Ramrod: Speaker2Animals: Story says nothing about how close or how large it is. No wonder that f*cking network is going down the tubes. Journalism, MFer! Do you speak it?

Second sentence: "The space rock is estimated to be 60 feet (18 meters) long."

The first caption, which automatically loads: "The space rock will come within one-tenth the distance from Earth to the moon, but it is not expected to threaten the planet."

So... yea...


Updated 3:09 p.m.  Those weren't in the original.
 
2014-09-04 06:00:38 PM  
I'm sure insurance companies are already consulting with lawyers on how they won't pay for anything it will hit.
 
2014-09-04 06:08:03 PM  

mongbiohazard: It's a 60 foot asteroid. That isn't an extinction causing hit even if it were going to hit us.

Now IF it hit Earth and IF it did so in a populated area, then yeah it could wipe out a small city/town, but not a whole country much less our civilization.


You mean I'm not going to get a chance to zugzug Lana?

/goddamnitsomuch
 
2014-09-04 06:09:03 PM  

Speaker2Animals: Story says nothing about how close or how large it is. No wonder that f*cking network is going down the tubes. Journalism, MFer! Do you speak it?



FTA & Illustration:

The space rock is estimated to be 60 feet (18 meters) long.
The space rock will come within one-tenth the distance from Earth to the moon
 
2014-09-04 06:19:11 PM  

dryknife: Speaker2Animals: Story says nothing about how close or how large it is. No wonder that f*cking network is going down the tubes. Journalism, MFer! Do you speak it?


FTA & Illustration:

The space rock is estimated to be 60 feet (18 meters) long.
The space rock will come within one-tenth the distance from Earth to the moon


Roughly 27,000 miles or half a cosmic gnat's ass.
 
2014-09-04 06:26:09 PM  
What did CNN do to piss off Fark? They get a new image logo once a week now.
 
2014-09-04 06:32:06 PM  
The article omits to mention it, but the graphic above says it: by "very close" they mean "1/10th the distance from the Earth to the Moon", and is 60ft long. To get a sense of what that means, picture the following:

- On a standard size professional basketball court, place a basketball under the hoop. That's the Earth.
- About midway between the three point line and the sideline, place a tennis ball. That's the Moon, to scale for both size and distance.

So now you can place a grain of sand 1/10th of the way out. That's the asteroid.
 
2014-09-04 06:52:28 PM  

Ishkur: Captain Steroid: [i1182.photobucket.com image 781x1024]

Y'know. For future reference. >.>

Is that handy chart for the zombies or us?


... Yes? o_o
 
2014-09-04 07:11:33 PM  

Smeggy Smurf: dryknife: Speaker2Animals: Story says nothing about how close or how large it is. No wonder that f*cking network is going down the tubes. Journalism, MFer! Do you speak it?


FTA & Illustration:

The space rock is estimated to be 60 feet (18 meters) long.
The space rock will come within one-tenth the distance from Earth to the moon

Roughly 27,000 miles or half a cosmic gnat's ass.


See 05:59:00 PM
 
2014-09-04 07:37:48 PM  
Even if it were a chunk of nickle iron traveling at 26k mps and impacting at 45 deg, the bang wouldn't be more than a couple of megatons and that would be from the breakup in atmosphere.  No big crater, just a bunch of small ones, you'd hear the air burst a hundred miles away though.


Here's a little something to play with.
http://www.purdue.edu/impactearth/
 
2014-09-04 07:47:12 PM  
Grab a quarter!

i291.photobucket.com

/pew pew pew
 
2014-09-04 08:01:49 PM  
 
2014-09-04 08:22:44 PM  
It's an omen.(Lose 1 stability)
 
2014-09-04 08:59:27 PM  

brantgoose: I'll let you in on a little secret. Asteroids the size of a house hit the atmosphere with the force of a small atomic bomb and explode. This happens on a regular basis and nobody dies because the USA and the former Soviet Union doesn't jump to conclusions and mistake them for atomic bombs.

The military released a lot of old data to astronomers some years ago, and this sort of thing is now part of the data used to calculate that your chances of dying by asteroid impact is about 1 in 9,000. That might seem low, but it includes the really rare and really big impacts that happen only once in a few hundred million or billion years.

If one asteroid big enough to wipe out civilization (and say, 10 billion people) can be expected to hit the Earth in the next million years, that is an average of 10,000 people a year, which is quite close to 1 in 9,000 a year. See how that works?

Well, in reality almost no one has ever been hit by a meteorite and we don't know of any people who have been killed by one. A dog did get killed by a meteorite in Egypt over a century ago. But that's all we know about.

That big explosion in Russia, the Tungusta Event, may have killed some natives but Russia didn't really have a count of the natives or any data on their mortality, so it is assumed to have flattened thousands of square miles of forest without killing anybody.

A 60-foot asteroid would be a bit bigger than the average house-sized asteroid but it would have to hit a high-flying airplane to have much chance of killing a human. Worry about crossing the street. You do it a lot more often with a much higher risk.

I am reading a book about the stories and numbers on death at the moment. Statisticians use a measure called the micro-mort (one chance in a million of dying). Smoking will cost you hundreds or even thousands of micro-morts. Asteroids, at 1 in 9,000 per year, would cost you about 111 micro-morts. That`s roughly one third of a micro-mort per day. Take a look at a cigarette. Tha ...


This report brought to you by Ric Romero. Ric Romero: telling you shiat you already know since 1977.
 
2014-09-04 09:18:39 PM  
don't worry, it's only a recon flyby
 
2014-09-04 10:16:38 PM  
Send Voltron.
 
2014-09-04 10:32:29 PM  

Kafka at the Improv: It's an omen.(Lose 1 stability)


This is killing me, I can't get the reference, help!
 
2014-09-04 10:58:38 PM  
I just want to feel the wind as it passes by.
And the roar of its engines...
 
2014-09-04 11:36:28 PM  

nelsonabreu: Kafka at the Improv: It's an omen.(Lose 1 stability)

This is killing me, I can't get the reference, help!


I want to say it's from one of those Paradox games, but I'm not sure myself.
 
2014-09-04 11:51:43 PM  

Kafka at the Improv: It's an omen.(Lose 1 stability)


It sure is an omen.

It says, "We better find all of these flying death rocks and track them, and make plans to deflect them, big or small." And we have a long way to go too. The article said that the one that hit Russia was a complete surprise. Good thing it wasn't bigger.

And then it says something about "The Castle of Aaaauuuggghhhh"
 
2014-09-05 05:32:50 AM  
We need more pollution, so that big asteroids will burn up in the atmosphere and be reduced to something no bigger than a chihuahua's head.
 
2014-09-05 10:58:26 AM  
"It is as the buzzing of flies to Vigo!"
 
2014-09-05 03:06:58 PM  

Smeggy Smurf: dryknife: Speaker2Animals: Story says nothing about how close or how large it is. No wonder that f*cking network is going down the tubes. Journalism, MFer! Do you speak it?


FTA & Illustration:

The space rock is estimated to be 60 feet (18 meters) long.
The space rock will come within one-tenth the distance from Earth to the moon

Roughly 27,000 miles or half a cosmic gnat's ass.


Or roughly the width of one Arcturan Mega-Donkey hoof.
 
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