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(Co.Exist)   Louisiana on track to become the first U.S. state entirely underwater by 2100 (w/ pics)   (fastcoexist.com) divider line 44
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3973 clicks; posted to Geek » on 04 Sep 2014 at 3:14 PM (3 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-09-04 12:36:57 PM
The President say, "Little fat man isn't it a shame what the river has done to this poor crackers land."
Louisiana, Louisiana
They're tryin' to wash us away
They're tryin' to wash us away
 
2014-09-04 12:52:55 PM
Well damn, Al Gore has to right eventually, don't he?
 
2014-09-04 02:34:57 PM
I think its a bit of hyperbole to say anything remotely close to "the entire state".  But the wetlands are most certainly a problem.  That's only a small portion of the state- but the fact that they're eroding is a major issue for us in LA.
 
2014-09-04 02:44:45 PM
What's the second state that's going to be entirely underwater by 2100?
 
2014-09-04 03:05:18 PM
Not just fiscally?
 
2014-09-04 03:23:06 PM
Is this before or after California breaks away from the mainland?
 
2014-09-04 03:26:58 PM
And nothing of value will have been lost.
 
2014-09-04 03:28:53 PM
2.bp.blogspot.com

Seriously its Lousyana.....
 
2014-09-04 03:33:36 PM
I guess New Orleans will be an underwater chocolate city then
 
2014-09-04 03:38:22 PM

downstairs: I think its a bit of hyperbole to say anything remotely close to "the entire state". But the wetlands are most certainly a problem. That's only a small portion of the state- but the fact that they're eroding is a major issue for us in LA.

Not just Louisiana:

ScaryBottles: [2.bp.blogspot.com image 500x282]
Seriously its Lousyana.....

I take it, then, that you don't eat seafood or plan on driving a vehicle or using petroleum in any way, directly or indirectly (that includes having anythng plastic, most pharmaceuticals, anything transported anywhere in most any way, any food grown with fertilizers or fed by anything grown with fertilizers, etc.)? ½ of the oil refineries in the entire nation are directly threatened by this (this includes the ability to refine petroleum that we get from elsewhere such as, oh, say, the Middle East), as is the Mississippi River shipping corridor, and, of course, the gulf seafood industry.
 
2014-09-04 03:44:39 PM

COMALite J: downstairs: I think its a bit of hyperbole to say anything remotely close to "the entire state". But the wetlands are most certainly a problem. That's only a small portion of the state- but the fact that they're eroding is a major issue for us in LA.
Not just Louisiana:

ScaryBottles: [2.bp.blogspot.com image 500x282]
Seriously its Lousyana.....
I take it, then, that you don't eat seafood or plan on driving a vehicle or using petroleum in any way, directly or indirectly (that includes having anythng plastic, most pharmaceuticals, anything transported anywhere in most any way, any food grown with fertilizers or fed by anything grown with fertilizers, etc.)? ½ of the oil refineries in the entire nation are directly threatened by this (this includes the ability to refine petroleum that we get from elsewhere such as, oh, say, the Middle East), as is the Mississippi River shipping corridor, and, of course, the gulf seafood industry.

x4.fjcdn.com
 
2014-09-04 03:47:28 PM
Won't miss it ...

/callous
 
2014-09-04 03:48:05 PM

COMALite J: downstairs: I think its a bit of hyperbole to say anything remotely close to "the entire state". But the wetlands are most certainly a problem. That's only a small portion of the state- but the fact that they're eroding is a major issue for us in LA.
Not just Louisiana:

ScaryBottles: [2.bp.blogspot.com image 500x282]
Seriously its Lousyana.....
I take it, then, that you don't eat seafood or plan on driving a vehicle or using petroleum in any way, directly or indirectly (that includes having anythng plastic, most pharmaceuticals, anything transported anywhere in most any way, any food grown with fertilizers or fed by anything grown with fertilizers, etc.)? ½ of the oil refineries in the entire nation are directly threatened by this (this includes the ability to refine petroleum that we get from elsewhere such as, oh, say, the Middle East), as is the Mississippi River shipping corridor, and, of course, the gulf seafood industry.


Oh I was just thinking personally, as the wetlands not being completely under water is our hurricane protection system.

But yeah, Louisiana is one of the most important places in the US in terms of what we produce and our ports/shipping lanes.
 
2014-09-04 03:48:49 PM
ScaryBottles:
[x4.fjcdn.com image 178x200]

Looks like I'm wrong on the Internet.  Better post a .jpg!
 
2014-09-04 04:01:28 PM
Thanks a lot, Thomas Jefferson!
 
2014-09-04 04:09:04 PM
At the current rate of sea level rise and land sinking, the Gulf of Mexico could rise up to 4.3 feet by 2100, putting the majority of southeast Louisiana (everything outside the levees) underwater. An entire culture--a swath of a U.S. state--buried.

You say this like it's a bad thing.
 
2014-09-04 04:33:35 PM

downstairs: COMALite J: downstairs: I think its a bit of hyperbole to say anything remotely close to "the entire state". But the wetlands are most certainly a problem. That's only a small portion of the state- but the fact that they're eroding is a major issue for us in LA.
Not just Louisiana:

ScaryBottles: [2.bp.blogspot.com image 500x282]
Seriously its Lousyana.....
I take it, then, that you don't eat seafood or plan on driving a vehicle or using petroleum in any way, directly or indirectly (that includes having anythng plastic, most pharmaceuticals, anything transported anywhere in most any way, any food grown with fertilizers or fed by anything grown with fertilizers, etc.)? ½ of the oil refineries in the entire nation are directly threatened by this (this includes the ability to refine petroleum that we get from elsewhere such as, oh, say, the Middle East), as is the Mississippi River shipping corridor, and, of course, the gulf seafood industry.

Oh I was just thinking personally, as the wetlands not being completely under water is our hurricane protection system.

But yeah, Louisiana is one of the most important places in the US in terms of what we produce and our ports/shipping lanes.

The sad thing is, the guy who came in second place in the 2007 gubernatorial election had a plan ― a real plan, not just a list of goals ― that would've easily funded coastal restoration. Back when he ran, it was already estimated that the coast was less than a decade away from the point of no return. How much has Jindall done to save the coast?

Flying Code Monkey: Won't miss it ...

/callous

Chainsaw Turd Elf: Thanks a lot, Thomas Jefferson!

DigitalCoffee: At the current rate of sea level rise and land sinking, the Gulf of Mexico could rise up to 4.3 feet by 2100, putting the majority of southeast Louisiana (everything outside the levees) underwater. An entire culture--a swath of a U.S. state--buried.

You say this like it's a bad thing.

gnosis301: ScaryBottles:
[x4.fjcdn.com image 178x200]

Looks like I'm wrong on the Internet. Better post a .jpg!

How about this one?
scienceblogs.com
Guess where the mouth of that biggest and most far-reaching navigable river, which services so much of our nation's farmland and remaining industrial areas, is?

 
2014-09-04 04:40:15 PM
I've been there. I'm okay with this. There are certain places that we shouldn't be trying to live in the first place. I would imagine that Florida would be next on that list?

//Ooh, I know. Floating cities. That would be okay as well.
 
2014-09-04 05:02:39 PM
Just let me bolt for Washington first.
 
2014-09-04 05:11:50 PM

COMALite J: The sad thing is, the guy who came in second place in the 2007 gubernatorial election had a plan ― a real plan, not just a list of goals ― that would've easily funded coastal restoration. Back when he ran, it was already estimated that the coast was less than a decade away from the point of no return. How much has Jindall done to save the coast?


I can't say, but FYI:   Louisiana's current coastal master plan, and a RAND study that underlies it.
 
2014-09-04 05:14:19 PM
Oh good.  Then Bobby Jindal will be the first governor to go down with his ship (of fools).
 
2014-09-04 05:17:59 PM
Living in northeast Louisiana, doesn't worry me much. Mainly because I'll be gone LONG before then anyway!

Unless I live to be 135.
 
2014-09-04 05:18:15 PM
I thought they took care of that in 2005.
 
2014-09-04 06:04:48 PM

foo monkey: I thought they took care of that in 2005.


The only way to fix it is to flush it all away.
 
2014-09-04 06:10:51 PM

Lt. Cheese Weasel: Al Gore


DRINK!
 
2014-09-04 06:13:33 PM

COMALite J: I take it, then, that you don't eat seafood or plan on driving a vehicle or using petroleum in any way, directly or indirectly (that includes having anythng plastic, most pharmaceuticals, anything transported anywhere in most any way, any food grown with fertilizers or fed by anything grown with fertilizers, etc.)? ½ of the oil refineries in the entire nation are directly threatened by this (this includes the ability to refine petroleum that we get from elsewhere such as, oh, say, the Middle East), as is the Mississippi River shipping corridor, and, of course, the gulf seafood industry.


So climate change is self correcting?
 
2014-09-04 06:21:39 PM
If they were nicer to gay people, they might get a little more help tidying up the place.
 
2014-09-04 07:00:47 PM
Jonh Coffey walks the Green Mile in 2101:

He's walking on the freshly tarred factory roof.
 
2014-09-04 07:47:23 PM

downstairs: I think its a bit of hyperbole to say anything remotely close to "the entire state".  But the wetlands are most certainly a problem.  That's only a small portion of the state- but the fact that they're eroding is a major issue for us in LA.


Are wetlands by definition already under water?
 
2014-09-04 07:55:18 PM

RightWingWacko: downstairs: I think its a bit of hyperbole to say anything remotely close to "the entire state".  But the wetlands are most certainly a problem.  That's only a small portion of the state- but the fact that they're eroding is a major issue for us in LA.

Are wetlands by definition already under water?


Well its the "lands" part that matters.  Its basically swamp land.  The key is if its completely water, with no plant growth, its a problem.  Hurricanes die quickly when they hit any kind of land.  Or at least, it makes them less intense.  If its all water and no growth, the hurricane keeps going and going... and unfortunately will eventually die down after hitting small and/or major cities.   Its a real big deal down here in LA.
 
2014-09-04 08:16:32 PM
In other news, land formations change over time, especially those near the mouths of major rivers.

IIRC, the bulk of the water that flows through the Mississippi would already have diverted to the Atchafalaya River by now if not for human intervention.
 
2014-09-04 09:25:12 PM
Well... bye!
 
2014-09-04 10:14:45 PM
Grumpycatgood.jpg
/can't believe that cat is worth $100 million
 
2014-09-04 10:32:56 PM
You can bet if a foreign power were taking that amount of land we'd be spending 100x the amount needed for coastal restoration in order to blow them directly to hell. With the full will of the people. But because this is an "environmental" issue, a large swath of folks will think it's bullshiat or not worth a dime.
 
2014-09-04 10:40:53 PM
Just build a berm
wonkroom.thinkprogress.org
 
2014-09-04 11:04:51 PM

Harvey Manfrenjensenjen: And nothing of value will have been lost.


This.
 
2014-09-04 11:14:26 PM

COMALite J: downstairs: COMALite J: downstairs: I think its a bit of hyperbole to say anything remotely close to "the entire state". But the wetlands are most certainly a problem. That's only a small portion of the state- but the fact that they're eroding is a major issue for us in LA.
Not just Louisiana:

ScaryBottles: [2.bp.blogspot.com image 500x282]
Seriously its Lousyana.....
I take it, then, that you don't eat seafood or plan on driving a vehicle or using petroleum in any way, directly or indirectly (that includes having anythng plastic, most pharmaceuticals, anything transported anywhere in most any way, any food grown with fertilizers or fed by anything grown with fertilizers, etc.)? ½ of the oil refineries in the entire nation are directly threatened by this (this includes the ability to refine petroleum that we get from elsewhere such as, oh, say, the Middle East), as is the Mississippi River shipping corridor, and, of course, the gulf seafood industry.

Oh I was just thinking personally, as the wetlands not being completely under water is our hurricane protection system.

But yeah, Louisiana is one of the most important places in the US in terms of what we produce and our ports/shipping lanes.
The sad thing is, the guy who came in second place in the 2007 gubernatorial election had a plan ― a real plan, not just a list of goals ― that would've easily funded coastal restoration. Back when he ran, it was already estimated that the coast was less than a decade away from the point of no return. How much has Jindall done to save the coast?

Flying Code Monkey: Won't miss it ...

/callous
Chainsaw Turd Elf: Thanks a lot, Thomas Jefferson!
DigitalCoffee: At the current rate of sea level rise and land sinking, the Gulf of Mexico could rise up to 4.3 feet by 2100, putting the majority of southeast Louisiana (everything outside the levees) underwater. An entire culture--a swath of a U.S. state--buried.

You say this like it's a bad thing.
gnosis301: ScaryBottles:
[x4.fjcdn.com ...


Not to be a debbie downer, but flooding and rising water levels seem like it would improve shipping availability up the Mississippi, not harm it. After all, larger boats with more cargo/lower hull depth would be able to navigate the river.

And oil platforms can just be extended.

If you want to convince people that wetlands receding is an issue, you probably shouldn't point out drop in the bucket costs to oil manufacturers and improved shipping lanes and thus cheaper goods delivery as the negative impact talking points.
 
2014-09-05 12:34:07 AM
3.bp.blogspot.com

"Lol"
 
2014-09-05 02:09:05 AM

Quantumbunny: COMALite J: downstairs: COMALite J: downstairs: I think its a bit of hyperbole to say anything remotely close to "the entire state". But the wetlands are most certainly a problem. That's only a small portion of the state- but the fact that they're eroding is a major issue for us in LA.
Not just Louisiana:

ScaryBottles: [2.bp.blogspot.com image 500x282]
Seriously its Lousyana.....
I take it, then, that you don't eat seafood or plan on driving a vehicle or using petroleum in any way, directly or indirectly (that includes having anythng plastic, most pharmaceuticals, anything transported anywhere in most any way, any food grown with fertilizers or fed by anything grown with fertilizers, etc.)? ½ of the oil refineries in the entire nation are directly threatened by this (this includes the ability to refine petroleum that we get from elsewhere such as, oh, say, the Middle East), as is the Mississippi River shipping corridor, and, of course, the gulf seafood industry.

Oh I was just thinking personally, as the wetlands not being completely under water is our hurricane protection system.

But yeah, Louisiana is one of the most important places in the US in terms of what we produce and our ports/shipping lanes.
The sad thing is, the guy who came in second place in the 2007 gubernatorial election had a plan ― a real plan, not just a list of goals ― that would've easily funded coastal restoration. Back when he ran, it was already estimated that the coast was less than a decade away from the point of no return. How much has Jindall done to save the coast?

Flying Code Monkey: Won't miss it ...

/callous
Chainsaw Turd Elf: Thanks a lot, Thomas Jefferson!
DigitalCoffee: At the current rate of sea level rise and land sinking, the Gulf of Mexico could rise up to 4.3 feet by 2100, putting the majority of southeast Louisiana (everything outside the levees) underwater. An entire culture--a swath of a U.S. state--buried.

You say this like it's a bad thing.
gnosis301: ScaryBottles:
[x4.fjcdn.com ...

Not to be a debbie downer, but flooding and rising water levels seem like it would improve shipping availability up the Mississippi, not harm it. After all, larger boats with more cargo/lower hull depth would be able to navigate the river.

And oil platforms can just be extended.

If you want to convince people that wetlands receding is an issue, you probably shouldn't point out drop in the bucket costs to oil manufacturers and improved shipping lanes and thus cheaper goods delivery as the negative impact talking points.

You don't get it. I wasn't talking about the navigability of the river itself. I was talking about the Port of New Orleans, which is what brings the raw materials from other nations to our river so that they can be sent to industrial centers (granted, we don't have as much of that as we used to), and conversely, the food we grow and the finished products we (used to) make to be shipped overseas. You need a functioning port, and you need a functioning city to support that port.

Also, I wasn't talking about oil platforms. I was talking about petroleum refineries (and said so outright). Those are on land near the coast, but the coastal land is going bye-bye. Which means the refineries are going bye-bye. We're talking fully ½ of the refineries in the entire nation. Keep in mind that the USA hasn't built a new refinery since the 1970s. It takes awhile to get one up and going from scratch.
 
2014-09-05 03:27:01 AM
 
2014-09-05 04:18:57 AM
Can't they just ask God to intervene?
 
2014-09-05 08:20:48 AM

ScaryBottles: [2.bp.blogspot.com image 500x282]

Seriously its Lousyana.....


So you've never been there?  New Orleans is probably my favorite city in the States (possibly 2nd to Savannah).  Or don't you like great food, friendly people, and no open intox laws?

/douche
 
2014-09-05 01:44:42 PM
The wetlands will be under water!

That's too wet!
 
2014-09-05 03:04:54 PM

LL316: ScaryBottles: [2.bp.blogspot.com image 500x282]

Seriously its Lousyana.....

So you've never been there?  New Orleans is probably my favorite city in the States (possibly 2nd to Savannah).  Or don't you like great food, friendly people, and no open intox laws?

/douche


Oh I've been there plenty of times it farking stinks worse than any city I've ever visited and I've spent plenty of time around the port of Houston so I don't mean that in a trivial way. No New Orleans is a total shiathole.

toychestsnarker.files.wordpress.com
 
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