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(Flixist)   Five things to know before starting a Kickstarter: Step 1 - Prepare to lose your mind   (flixist.com) divider line 22
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3668 clicks; posted to Geek » on 03 Sep 2014 at 9:05 PM (38 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



22 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-09-03 08:25:10 PM  
6.  No one is going to give you money to fund your documentary on Czech pottery styles from 1591-1612.  Well, ok, here's $5.
 
2014-09-03 09:39:19 PM  
Step 2.) Post circuitous links to Kickstarter through story about another kickstarter on many "social media sites" to get around site rules that prohibit panhandling
 
2014-09-03 09:39:24 PM  

Mentat: 6.  No one is going to give you money to fund your documentary on Czech pottery styles from 1591-1612.  Well, ok, here's $5.


Of course not. If you don't include 1613-1614 then you really haven't covered ALL of the really important styles, or zgthtlzs as it was said at the time.
 
2014-09-03 09:50:46 PM  
i was sure step was "abandon all pretense of scruples"
 
2014-09-03 09:51:34 PM  

Bonanza Jellybean: i was sure step was "abandon all pretense of scruples"


derp
 
2014-09-03 09:54:34 PM  

LadySusan: Mentat: 6.  No one is going to give you money to fund your documentary on Czech pottery styles from 1591-1612.  Well, ok, here's $5.

Of course not. If you don't include 1613-1614 then you really haven't covered ALL of the really important styles, or zgthtlzs as it was said at the time.


If they aren't covering Bottger, I want no part of this documentary.
 
2014-09-03 09:56:44 PM  

italie: LadySusan: Mentat: 6.  No one is going to give you money to fund your documentary on Czech pottery styles from 1591-1612.  Well, ok, here's $5.

Of course not. If you don't include 1613-1614 then you really haven't covered ALL of the really important styles, or zgthtlzs as it was said at the time.

If they aren't covering Bottger, I want no part of this documentary.


Meh. I got $5, if it's any good, I'll throw $5 at the sequel, it'll need to be that long to do the subject justice. Might even need to be a trilogy.
 
2014-09-03 10:05:28 PM  
I just pitched a business to a lawfirm specializing in private offerings.

Either you have a good business plan or you do not. Either you know how to make a profit or you don't.

Now a lot of Kickstarters are probably best described as "art" which has always been either patronized by the rich or resulted in starving artists for those without the connections.

I talked my way in 15 minutes into a really good shot at $800k for what I considered a very very good deal even though the lawyer said a lot of other places are cheaper.

You have a good idea for a business, you put it out there for others to tear apart (or worse ignore completely) and you don't do everything you can to protect it and yourself?

That ceramics documentary is good for Kickstarter because you probably will have trouble monetizing it to pay back investors. But if you can turn a reasonable ROI then throw the numbers together and call up someone who knows how to get you money. Kickstarter might be good for raising money for the fees but that is as far as I'd take it.

And once you have made money for one group others will open their checkbooks eagerly.
 
2014-09-03 10:34:11 PM  

I Put Ketchup On My Smoked Brisket: And once you have made money for one group others will open their checkbooks eagerly.


The problem with this country is 99% of us don't know how to do anything you mentioned, and can't find anyone to tell us.
 
2014-09-03 10:52:32 PM  
So asking people to give you free money isn't easy? Who knew.
 
2014-09-03 10:54:49 PM  
What a shiat site.
 
2014-09-03 11:43:46 PM  
I thought it said "Kindergartener." But I had a 2 year old crawling on me at the time, so it made sense.
 
2014-09-04 01:17:18 AM  

I Put Ketchup On My Smoked Brisket: I just pitched a business to a lawfirm specializing in private offerings...


I could never believe this story from someone who puts ketchup on their smoked brisket.
 
2014-09-04 03:30:23 AM  
The "entrepreneur" game is and always has been rigged just because of the huge difference in the relative intelligence levels of people.

Few people truly grasp the degree to which life is not fair.
 
2014-09-04 06:55:28 AM  
My friends keep telling me to use Kickstarter to fund some creative projects I've put on the backburner. I have to wonder what the chances are for a complete unknown to accomplish this sort of thing. I mean, how does finding a publisher or manufacturer factor into these things?
 
2014-09-04 08:19:51 AM  

I Like Bread: My friends keep telling me to use Kickstarter to fund some creative projects I've put on the backburner. I have to wonder what the chances are for a complete unknown to accomplish this sort of thing. I mean, how does finding a publisher or manufacturer factor into these things?


Depends on what you need really. China is cheap, but chancy, America, surprisingly, still has some manufacturers around, Germany, etc. I design board and card games and I was pleasantly surprised to know how many options I have.

As for 'unknown' go for it as long as you have the bugs worked out. I have no clue who designed a quarter of the stuff that has funded on Kickstarter. How else are you going to GET known?
 
2014-09-04 08:49:09 AM  
How to be successful on Kickstarter:
Have a sound plan -- nope.
Make a well-reasoned pitch -- nope.
Post proof of concept that shows you're serious -- nope.
Beg because it's for a good cause -- nope.

Say you want to raise a few bucks for potato salad -- CHA-CHING!!!

I don't think anyone in this world has a right to complain about anything.

Cpl.D: The problem with this country is 99% of us don't know how to do anything you mentioned, and can't find anyone to tell us.

There's nothing to know.  What most lack (beyond an idea worth two cents to begin with) are connections and capital.  It turns out a lot of people make it big because they're trust fund babies so raking in $100k-200k to seed fund whatever they want is about as difficult as collecting their allowance.  And if it fails?  Oh well, on to the next idea.  Eventually all these failures start counting as "experience" and they start failing upwards.  If you have to make it the meritocratic way because you have a mortgage, bust your ass for ten years, stretch your credit to the limit and maybe you'll get a break.  95% of the time you'll go bankrupt instead.
Most successful entrepreneurs start out with enough money to fail until something works.  Most of the rest are con men.  The miniscule remainder are elite workaholics in a very real sense but for obvious yet irrational reasons this is how most entrepreneurs think of themselves.  Thing is, their success stories become news stories because they're truly remarkable.  The company I work for was founded by an entrepreneur but he was a goddamn genius -- MIT grad, Special Forces, the works.  I wouldn't even imagine trying to be that guy.

I Like Bread: My friends keep telling me to use Kickstarter to fund some creative projects I've put on the backburner. I have to wonder what the chances are for a complete unknown to accomplish this sort of thing. I mean, how does finding a publisher or manufacturer factor into these things?

In my experience -- you don't.  Unless you're writing crappy vampire romance, you have to get some content out there first.  Kevin Smith maxed out his personal funds to make Clerks.  AVGN crowdfunded his movie but by that point he'd built up a solid fan following.  I knew a singer who went pro but she started out in amateur groups; nine years later she's signed but still struggling to get name recognition.  If you're writing, the first few things you write you'll have to offer for free.  If it's anything else, YouTube.  The upside is 100% creative control; the downside is that it's self-funded.  I'd actually recommend "practice" projects to develop skill while building up a reputation.  Ironically, these efforts can often take on lives of their own and become more successful than the magnum opus they were supposed to be a primer for, but there's less pressure because if a practice project fails you can just start over.
I've said this in other threads, but if you have an idea "on the backburner" but you're not already a millionaire you ain't got shiat.  It sucks but that's how it goes.  If you have any scruples (to borrow from Bonanza Jellybean) you've got to have an irrational passion that would prevent the project from ever getting on the backburner in the first place.
 
2014-09-04 09:37:53 AM  
Holy shiat, you mean it takes work to get money?  What kind of bullshiat is that?  I mean c'mon, apparently having to do a little work in exchange for money will cause you to "lose your mind."

Put down the keyboard and get back to making my mocha caramel frappachino, you millenium slacker.  Apparently that's about the extent of effort you can handle without your brains melting out of your ears.
 
2014-09-04 09:51:15 AM  

dragonchild: I've said this in other threads, but if you have an idea "on the backburner" but you're not already a millionaire you ain't got shiat.  It sucks but that's how it goes.  If you have any scruples (to borrow from Bonanza Jellybean) you've got to have an irrational passion that would prevent the project from ever getting on the backburner in the first place.


I agree that it doesn't amount to anything, but I'm wondering if that attitude is the reason why I'm in my 30s, having worked both in dead-end jobs and heading small companies, and still find no direction professionally. Without getting into too much pop psychoanalysis, instead of irrational passion i have irrational hopelessness, that my natural talents are a waste of time (despite other people constantly telling me how great my work is (though I ask myself where all these supportive people were the first half of my life)).

At any rate, I also agree with you on the first part, though it does feel like a chicken-and-egg conundrum. In order to get my stuff out there, I need to get some recognition, which means I have to get my stuff out there...
 
2014-09-04 10:07:05 AM  
s3.amazonaws.com
 
2014-09-04 10:43:07 AM  

I Like Bread: I agree that it doesn't amount to anything, but I'm wondering if that attitude is the reason why I'm in my 30s, having worked both in dead-end jobs and heading small companies, and still find no direction professionally.

I'm half ranting because I'm in a similar situation, though I do have a plan to get out of it.  But I still find myself thinking, "Damn, I'm going to have to make some really big decisions or I'm just not serious about this."

I Like Bread: In order to get my stuff out there, I need to get some recognition, which means I have to get my stuff out there...

No.  You don't need recognition to get some stuff out there; you're just not going to control what others do with it.  It may flop.  It may take off.  You may have to relinquish control of it, which is why I suggest a "sacrificial" work, though these often take a life of their own and people tend to view their past works differently over time.  You'll also have to start out small & controlled -- if you're a writer, start with short stories; if you're a singer upload covers; if you're a filmmaker upload short clips, etc.  But getting stuff out there isn't the barrier.

Matt Groening's career is illustrative.  He first worked crappy jobs until he worked for a newspaper which published his comic strip Life in Hell.  That got him into TV, whereupon to protect his IP he made a "sacrificial" work (The Simpsons) -- which was a prudent move because by season 3, Fox had kicked him out.  Eventually he made Futurama by which point there was no evidence he retained interest in making Life in Hell into a show.  The alternatives (outside of Hollywood legacy which you're obviously not part of) are Kevin Smith and AVGN.  Smith threw everything he had into Clerks and it paid off, but I wouldn't recommend this route because he was working 22-hour days and very easily could've gone bankrupt.  As a cautionary tale, the makers of the original Texas Chainsaw Massacre had to bargain away all their interest in the movie just to get it out there, meaning they made no money off it at all.  AVGN just released his movie (crowdfunded!) but that took him eight years to make; by his own admission he's not interested in getting any bigger.  I don't know what "creative projects" you're planning but most routes are similar.  The pro singer I knew is signed but still trying to build a reputation.  I've worked in four different industries and personally don't know any successful entrepreneurs (though I've seen a few go under), which says something about the success rate there.
 
2014-09-05 08:46:56 AM  

Cpl.D: I Put Ketchup On My Smoked Brisket: And once you have made money for one group others will open their checkbooks eagerly.

The problem with this country is 99% of us don't know how to do anything you mentioned, and can't find anyone to tell us.


That's an easy one. Look locally for your Small Business Development office. Likely at a local college/univ.  They will hold lots of free seminars and will be happy to help in all sorts of ways.
 
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