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(Bloomberg)   Apple says the security breach they just patched was totally not a security breach   (bloomberg.com) divider line 55
    More: Obvious  
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1134 clicks; posted to Business » on 02 Sep 2014 at 9:31 PM (15 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-09-02 06:06:03 PM  
Its not a bug you see, its a feature.
 
2014-09-02 06:11:25 PM  

Caffienatedjedi: Its not a bug you see, its a feature.


iShare.
 
2014-09-02 06:15:02 PM  
iCandy
 
2014-09-02 06:16:43 PM  
"compromised by a very targeted attack on user names, passwords and security questions, a practice that is all too common on the Internet,"

So the system was only intermittently breached?
 
2014-09-02 06:18:08 PM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: iCandy



That is clever!
 
2014-09-02 07:04:49 PM  
You have got to be kidding. Apple is seriously in "blame the victim" mode here? They're saying it's not their fault, the users should have had stronger passwords? And yet they allowed the users to use these passwords?

They're basically saying that only the people that a bunch of horny guys want to see naked were hacked, so everyone that's not attractive and famous doesn't have anything to worry about since no one wants to see them naked. They're saying their system worked exactly as it was designed.

A couple of weeks ago I was running a test on a new router firewall, so I ran a connection on my laptop through a proxy in South America. I wasn't thinking and left my email client up. Within two minutes I had a text message from Gmail saying that something funny was going on, and on my desktop my email client could not check my email. I closed out my client, and after I ran my test, I ditched the proxy and brought my email client back up and had another message waiting for me asking if I knew about that attempt, and if it was me. I didn't have to add on any extra security functions, it just functioned seamlessly. I could have replied to the text message that it was okay, but I didn't want anyone else using that proxy to be able to access my email.

Apple is a bigger company than Google. If Google can protect my stuff this way, why can't Apple? I'd bet money every single one of these people who were hacked had it happen while their phone was on network, and most were likely logged into the same iTunes account on their home computer, since it's damn near impossible to boot a computer with iTunes installed without iTunes running in the background and tracking anything you do relating to multimedia. How could anyone try to pull a backup from a different IP address while those two things were going on, without some huge red flags being thrown? Why not a text message asking for confirmation?

Apple, ya done goofed here, and this press release is just more "blame the victim". These people paid you to keep their stuff secure. If you can't do it without the user doing X, then you have to force the user to do X or else not agree to take their money in exchange for keeping their data secure.
 
2014-09-02 07:07:35 PM  
I am actually buying their story. The comments floating around seem to indicate that the pictures in question were acquired over an extended period of time by "conventional" means and only shared between a small group of people. The only reason we have the huge content dump now is some guy bought up some of their content and started posting it on /b.
 
2014-09-02 07:08:06 PM  
iYuhYuhy

That slick device you call MyPhone
It just might get your images pown'd
Those photos de boudoire
Got on 4chan's radar
It's like rape, so you can't have a bone
 
2014-09-02 07:08:36 PM  
"When we learned of the theft, we were outraged and immediately mobilized Apple's engineers to discover the source," Apple said. "Our customers' privacy and security are of utmost importance to us."

Yeh, THAT would have happened if Joe Schmuck had put in a support ticket for noticing his account was accessed by a 3rd party.

Celebrity leak plus FBI? World-class incident response.
 
2014-09-02 07:11:28 PM  
A targeted breach is technically different than a wide-scale breach. It's not really different from the customer's point of view, but it is technically distinct.
 
2014-09-02 07:13:39 PM  

Caffienatedjedi: Its not a bug you see, its a feature.


a puffy one
 
2014-09-02 07:15:13 PM  

ox45tallboy: You have got to be kidding. Apple is seriously in "blame the victim" mode here? They're saying it's not their fault, the users should have had stronger passwords? And yet they allowed the users to use these passwords?

They're basically saying that only the people that a bunch of horny guys want to see naked were hacked, so everyone that's not attractive and famous doesn't have anything to worry about since no one wants to see them naked. They're saying their system worked exactly as it was designed.

A couple of weeks ago I was running a test on a new router firewall, so I ran a connection on my laptop through a proxy in South America. I wasn't thinking and left my email client up. Within two minutes I had a text message from Gmail saying that something funny was going on, and on my desktop my email client could not check my email. I closed out my client, and after I ran my test, I ditched the proxy and brought my email client back up and had another message waiting for me asking if I knew about that attempt, and if it was me. I didn't have to add on any extra security functions, it just functioned seamlessly. I could have replied to the text message that it was okay, but I didn't want anyone else using that proxy to be able to access my email.

Apple is a bigger company than Google. If Google can protect my stuff this way, why can't Apple? I'd bet money every single one of these people who were hacked had it happen while their phone was on network, and most were likely logged into the same iTunes account on their home computer, since it's damn near impossible to boot a computer with iTunes installed without iTunes running in the background and tracking anything you do relating to multimedia. How could anyone try to pull a backup from a different IP address while those two things were going on, without some huge red flags being thrown? Why not a text message asking for confirmation?

Apple, ya done goofed here, and this press release is just more "blame the victim". These people paid you to keep their stuff secure. If you can't do it without the user doing X, then you have to force the user to do X or else not agree to take their money in exchange for keeping their data secure.


I think they were trying to clarify that the vulnerability that was recently patched was not the source of all of these girls pictures.

That said, I can't believe they're still using the same lame questions that allow users to reset their passwords. P
 
2014-09-02 08:29:48 PM  

b2theory: That said, I can't believe they're still using the same lame questions that allow users to reset their passwords. P


What's a good one?
 
2014-09-02 08:32:53 PM  

b2theory: That said, I can't believe they're still using the same lame questions that allow users to reset their passwords. P


I always make up a completely stupid answer anyway - never anything real. That's too easily found out these days.
 
2014-09-02 08:35:45 PM  

moothemagiccow: b2theory: That said, I can't believe they're still using the same lame questions that allow users to reset their passwords. P

What's a good one?


SMS your phone with a temp password.

Not fool proof but better.
 
2014-09-02 09:39:04 PM  

ox45tallboy: They're basically saying that only the people that a bunch of horny guys want to see naked were hacked, so everyone that's not attractive and famous doesn't have anything to worry about since no one wants to see them naked. They're saying their system worked exactly as it was designed.


which if you read the wired article about it (http://www.wired.com/2014/09/eppb-icloud/) isn't even true. if you believe their report, lots of people have been getting their pictures and data stolen through this same exploit (basically a brute force/security tool combo.)
 
2014-09-02 09:50:33 PM  

ox45tallboy: You have got to be kidding. Apple is seriously in "blame the victim" mode here? They're saying it's not their fault, the users should have had stronger passwords? And yet they allowed the users to use these passwords?


Think of it like your luggage. When you've got your clothes in it, 12345 is a perfectly acceptable combination. When you've got a pistol in your luggage, a simple 5-digit combination isn't really a good idea, is it? It also isn't the luggage's responsibility to make that determination.
 
2014-09-02 09:54:21 PM  

So in other words, going by all the stuff various Farkers have posted, Apple saying it was not their fault are essentially "blaming" the actresses and victimizing them?


Can't wait for the Farkers who try to equate this with rape, and make it like these actresses should not practice personal responsibility or reasonable behavior.

 
2014-09-02 10:17:21 PM  
Like I've said in other topics, the iCloud is about to lose a shiatload of popularity.

My other prediction is likely off - I think the next iPhone is too far along to get it, but the one after that is going to have expandable memory slots.
 
2014-09-02 10:19:24 PM  
SomethingAwful tried to go to a supersecure password system that not only demanded a long, random string of characters, etc. but also required being reset after a set amount of time.  The users went nuts and, because it's the internet, IT WAS THE WORST THING EVER.

I couldn't imagine what kind of crybabies Apple customers would be if they started requiring stronger passwords.
 
2014-09-02 10:22:34 PM  

ox45tallboy: You have got to be kidding. Apple is seriously in "blame the victim" mode here? They're saying it's not their fault, the users should have had stronger passwords? And yet they allowed the users to use these passwords?


If you were forced to select strong passwords, you'd biatch.

And then you'd use the same "strong" password on all sites.
 
2014-09-02 10:40:46 PM  

spawn73: ox45tallboy: You have got to be kidding. Apple is seriously in "blame the victim" mode here? They're saying it's not their fault, the users should have had stronger passwords? And yet they allowed the users to use these passwords?

If you were forced to select strong passwords, you'd biatch.

And then you'd use the same "strong" password on all sites.


Or use a password manager with a really weak master password.
 
2014-09-02 10:45:04 PM  
Pro tip: If you don't want nude photos of yourself to leak, don't take nude photos.

As to the other photos? It's the internet age, don't be an idiot.
 
2014-09-02 10:46:02 PM  

skinink: So in other words, going by all the stuff various Farkers have posted, Apple saying it was not their fault are essentially "blaming" the actresses and victimizing them?
Can't wait for the Farkers who try to equate this with rape, and make it like these actresses should not practice personal responsibility or reasonable behavior.


It's a couple tabs to the left. Like 500 comments already tonight.
 
2014-09-02 11:05:29 PM  

Clutch2013: Like I've said in other topics, the iCloud is about to lose a shiatload of popularity.

My other prediction is likely off - I think the next iPhone is too far along to get it, but the one after that is going to have expandable memory slots.


It might lose some popularity for a few days but then people are going to get tired of doing the things that iCloud takes care of automatically and turn it back on.
 
2014-09-02 11:16:31 PM  

Tobin_Lam: Clutch2013: Like I've said in other topics, the iCloud is about to lose a shiatload of popularity.

My other prediction is likely off - I think the next iPhone is too far along to get it, but the one after that is going to have expandable memory slots.

It might lose some popularity for a few days but then people are going to get tired of doing the things that iCloud takes care of automatically and turn it back on.


Samsung is going to have a field day. Imagine all these actresses suddenly becoming spokeswomen for them or Google?
 
2014-09-02 11:25:42 PM  

Tobin_Lam: Think of it like your luggage.


Okay.  "Hey Samsonite?  I lost my combination.  It's a brown bag.  Kind of largish, but still small.  You're resetting the password for me and sending it to my new address?  Thanks!"
 
2014-09-02 11:26:06 PM  

ox45tallboy: You have got to be kidding. Apple is seriously in "blame the victim" mode here? They're saying it's not their fault, the users should have had stronger passwords? And yet they allowed the users to use these passwords?

They're basically saying that only the people that a bunch of horny guys want to see naked were hacked, so everyone that's not attractive and famous doesn't have anything to worry about since no one wants to see them naked. They're saying their system worked exactly as it was designed.

A couple of weeks ago I was running a test on a new router firewall, so I ran a connection on my laptop through a proxy in South America. I wasn't thinking and left my email client up. Within two minutes I had a text message from Gmail saying that something funny was going on, and on my desktop my email client could not check my email. I closed out my client, and after I ran my test, I ditched the proxy and brought my email client back up and had another message waiting for me asking if I knew about that attempt, and if it was me. I didn't have to add on any extra security functions, it just functioned seamlessly. I could have replied to the text message that it was okay, but I didn't want anyone else using that proxy to be able to access my email.

Apple is a bigger company than Google. If Google can protect my stuff this way, why can't Apple? I'd bet money every single one of these people who were hacked had it happen while their phone was on network, and most were likely logged into the same iTunes account on their home computer, since it's damn near impossible to boot a computer with iTunes installed without iTunes running in the background and tracking anything you do relating to multimedia. How could anyone try to pull a backup from a different IP address while those two things were going on, without some huge red flags being thrown? Why not a text message asking for confirmation?

Apple, ya done goofed here, and this press release is just more "blame the victim" ...


Well yeah, they're the ones ultimately responsible for their data. Apple is not on the hook for them choosing lousy passwords.

Apple even integrates a strong password tool into its devices - it will auto-generate a strong password, then key it to your keychain (Apple's password locker built into the OS, which syncs both MOSX and iOS) so you only need to know one password.

And what if Apple makes people have long complex passwords they need to type each time? People whine about putting them in. I've heard reports they used a 500 most common passwords list. You can't fix stupid.

If you don't lock your door at night, I feel bad if you get robbed but I'm not shocked. You lock sensitive data behind a common guessable password, I feel bad you were violated but I'm not shocked. You only need a little bit of security to make most bad guys say "eh, no thanks, I'll find another sap."

Clutch2013: Like I've said in other topics, the iCloud is about to lose a shiatload of popularity.

My other prediction is likely off - I think the next iPhone is too far along to get it, but the one after that is going to have expandable memory slots.


I don't see why. This is the better, right way to handle digital files - keeping them digital and keeping them online. Putting them onto physical media is a heck of a lot less secure because if you lose access, there's absolutely 0 control you have. Plus Apple will not do it, because external slots are really, really annoying on Android where it's supposedly baked-in,  let alone on IOS which isn't made fori t.
 
2014-09-02 11:27:45 PM  

skinink: So in other words, going by all the stuff various Farkers have posted, Apple saying it was not their fault are essentially "blaming" the actresses and victimizing them?
Can't wait for the Farkers who try to equate this with rape, and make it like these actresses should not practice personal responsibility or reasonable behavior.


Blame or not, Apple basically admitted that anyone in the public eye has no reasonable expectation of privacy when using their devices (or when their boyfriends or husbands do). They may as well run a 24/7 google hangout and livestream their photos and texts for all the security apple is giving them.

I mean, shiat, the NSA or anyone with equivalent determination could be looking through my webcam right the fark now. The only defense I have is that I'm boring.

I know all this shiat is new and different to you, but farking snapchat has 400,000,000 messages sent per day. A lot of people want some degree of privacy when sharing digital photos or messages. Whether or not it's feasible is irrelevant.
 
2014-09-02 11:30:05 PM  

GardenWeasel: Tobin_Lam: Clutch2013: Like I've said in other topics, the iCloud is about to lose a shiatload of popularity.

My other prediction is likely off - I think the next iPhone is too far along to get it, but the one after that is going to have expandable memory slots.

It might lose some popularity for a few days but then people are going to get tired of doing the things that iCloud takes care of automatically and turn it back on.

Samsung is going to have a field day. Imagine all these actresses suddenly becoming spokeswomen for them or Google?


Not all the pictures came from iCloud, though. There were some Android phones in there as well.
 
2014-09-02 11:31:05 PM  

Tourney3p0: Tobin_Lam: Think of it like your luggage.

Okay.  "Hey Samsonite?  I lost my combination.  It's a brown bag.  Kind of largish, but still small.  You're resetting the password for me and sending it to my new address?  Thanks!"


Ok, the analogy isn't perfect but I still think it is fairly close.
 
2014-09-02 11:32:57 PM  

Tobin_Lam: Tourney3p0: Tobin_Lam: Think of it like your luggage.

Okay.  "Hey Samsonite?  I lost my combination.  It's a brown bag.  Kind of largish, but still small.  You're resetting the password for me and sending it to my new address?  Thanks!"

Ok, the analogy isn't perfect but I still think it is fairly close.


I don't think it's close at all.  The entire premise is a "weak password", but that's not at all what happened.  To claim otherwise is to sweep a pretty big problem under the rug, a problem that most vendors have solved long ago.
 
2014-09-02 11:41:51 PM  

ox45tallboy: You have got to be kidding. Apple is seriously in "blame the victim" mode here? They're saying it's not their fault, the users should have had stronger passwords? And yet they allowed the users to use these passwords?

They're basically saying that only the people that a bunch of horny guys want to see naked were hacked, so everyone that's not attractive and famous doesn't have anything to worry about since no one wants to see them naked. They're saying their system worked exactly as it was designed.

A couple of weeks ago I was running a test on a new router firewall, so I ran a connection on my laptop through a proxy in South America. I wasn't thinking and left my email client up. Within two minutes I had a text message from Gmail saying that something funny was going on, and on my desktop my email client could not check my email. I closed out my client, and after I ran my test, I ditched the proxy and brought my email client back up and had another message waiting for me asking if I knew about that attempt, and if it was me. I didn't have to add on any extra security functions, it just functioned seamlessly. I could have replied to the text message that it was okay, but I didn't want anyone else using that proxy to be able to access my email.

Apple is a bigger company than Google. If Google can protect my stuff this way, why can't Apple? I'd bet money every single one of these people who were hacked had it happen while their phone was on network, and most were likely logged into the same iTunes account on their home computer, since it's damn near impossible to boot a computer with iTunes installed without iTunes running in the background and tracking anything you do relating to multimedia. How could anyone try to pull a backup from a different IP address while those two things were going on, without some huge red flags being thrown? Why not a text message asking for confirmation?

Apple, ya done goofed here, and this press release is just more "blame the victim" ...


You have never used an iPhone or Apple product in your life have you? They send all types of emails to people for all sorts of things. I manage a fleet of over 1000 phones, both android and iOS, for a Fortune 500 company and they send you all kinds of emails. You change your email or password, you get an email, you sign into a new device that wasn't on your account, you get an email. You sign in or out of icloud, you get an email. You do this or that, you get an email. Etc etc etc. To the point of absolutely being annoying. it is very easy to setup filters on gmail or have gmail learn that you want to delete something like those reminders and you will never see them again.

Now just think if you are a busy hollywood starlet always on set and working mad hours you probably won't notice these emails. Then you have people on the deep web using programs like the EPPB to try and steal your info with phishing emails or trading of usernames and passwords. EPPB is extremely powerful if you have all the right info, almost to the point of scary. If you follow this program into the darker corners of the net you will see people trading all sorts of info they gleam from these rips all because some idiot in Iowa saw a fake email and responded with all the security questions or the username and password.

http://www.elcomsoft.com/eppb.html

When it comes to pulling info from someone it is easier to get it straight from the weakest link the in the chain ,which is the user, than it is to try and pound your way into a high valued target like Apple and hope no one finds your traces of intrusion.
 
2014-09-03 12:09:18 AM  

saintstryfe: Well yeah, they're the ones ultimately responsible for their data. Apple is not on the hook for them choosing lousy passwords.


The quality of a password depends on the number of tries an attacker gets. A 4-digit numeric PIN is OK for something which locks you out after three failed attempts. 8 alphanumeric characters are more than enough for a server which limits you to one login attempt every 5 seconds, but won't last long against an attacker who can run offline attacks against the hashed version of the password. Apple's flaw made it too easy for people to brute-force weak passwords, so they share the blame for any accounts which were compromised through that method.
 
2014-09-03 12:12:20 AM  

Ivo Shandor: saintstryfe: Well yeah, they're the ones ultimately responsible for their data. Apple is not on the hook for them choosing lousy passwords.

The quality of a password depends on the number of tries an attacker gets. A 4-digit numeric PIN is OK for something which locks you out after three failed attempts. 8 alphanumeric characters are more than enough for a server which limits you to one login attempt every 5 seconds, but won't last long against an attacker who can run offline attacks against the hashed version of the password. Apple's flaw made it too easy for people to brute-force weak passwords, so they share the blame for any accounts which were compromised through that method.


Can people stop repeating this line about the iBrute bot doing the work through the Find my iPhone portal. It is the most tired out piece of BS on the whole internet yet morons upon morons keep running with it. the bot first off wasn't even proven to work and it used a common dictionary to make guesses which Apple specifically has people avoid when setting up an Apple ID. This vector to make the attack was a simple phishing exercise which people fall into all the time.
 
2014-09-03 12:14:43 AM  

Here's an excellent article exploring the people who do this and how.

https://www.nikcub.com/posts/notes-on-the-celebrity-data-theft/

After this story broke I spent some time immersed in the crazy, obsessive subculture of celebrity nudes and revenge porn trying to work out what they were doing, how they were doing it and what could be learned from it.

1. What we see in the public with these hacking incidents seems to only be scratching the surface. There are entire communities and trading networks where the data that is stolen remains private and is rarely shared with the public.

2. The goal is to steal private media from a targets phone by accessing cloud based backup services that are integrated into iPhone, Android and Windows Phone devices. To access the cloud based backup requires the users ID, password or an authentication token.

3. The roles in the networks break down as:

Users who scour Facebook and other social media looking for targets and collecting as much information as possible. Data collection includes utilizing public record services and purchasing credit reports. Obtaining data on a target includes setting up fake profiles, friending or following friends of the target, being persistent with extracting information that might help answer secret questions, approaching male friends of the target, etc.

Users who use the target data to retrieve passwords or authentication keys. There are numerous methods here and most have tutorials available online. The most common are RATs, phishing, password recovery and password reset.
 
2014-09-03 12:18:33 AM  

Tobin_Lam: GardenWeasel: Tobin_Lam: Clutch2013: Like I've said in other topics, the iCloud is about to lose a shiatload of popularity.

My other prediction is likely off - I think the next iPhone is too far along to get it, but the one after that is going to have expandable memory slots.

It might lose some popularity for a few days but then people are going to get tired of doing the things that iCloud takes care of automatically and turn it back on.

Samsung is going to have a field day. Imagine all these actresses suddenly becoming spokeswomen for them or Google?

Not all the pictures came from iCloud, though. There were some Android phones in there as well.


Please stop trying to inject reason and logic into a derp-fest.
 
2014-09-03 12:22:13 AM  

saintstryfe: Well yeah, they're the ones ultimately responsible for their data. Apple is not on the hook for them choosing lousy passwords.Apple even integrates a strong password tool into its devices - it will auto-generate a strong password, then key it to your keychain (Apple's password locker built into the OS, which syncs both MOSX and iOS) so you only need to know one password.And what if Apple makes people have long complex passwords they need to type each time? People whine about putting them in. I've heard reports they used a 500 most common passwords list. You can't fix stupid.


You can audit and lock out accounts where attacks are taking place.  You can observe the IPs where access is coming from and alert the user that access is coming from a different location.

Single factor authentication with no attempt at mitigating or reporting brute force attacks is pretty damn useless and that's what we're talking about here.
 
2014-09-03 12:25:49 AM  

Tobin_Lam: GardenWeasel: Tobin_Lam: Clutch2013: Like I've said in other topics, the iCloud is about to lose a shiatload of popularity.

My other prediction is likely off - I think the next iPhone is too far along to get it, but the one after that is going to have expandable memory slots.

It might lose some popularity for a few days but then people are going to get tired of doing the things that iCloud takes care of automatically and turn it back on.

Samsung is going to have a field day. Imagine all these actresses suddenly becoming spokeswomen for them or Google?

Not all the pictures came from iCloud, though. There were some Android phones in there as well.


I thought it was determined their SOs had iPhones, and so they were likely picked up when the Android user shared with them? Based on pics of the SO with said phone in hand.
 
2014-09-03 12:25:49 AM  

b2theory: The comments floating around seem to indicate that the pictures in question were acquired over an extended period of time by "conventional" means and only shared between a small group of people.


Comments don't mean anything.  I could be making a dumb and uninformed comment on the internet right now, and no one would ever know.

That being said, the dump clearly contained material from a mix of sources: some iPhone camera pics, some squared-off and filtered Instagram pics, some with Redditor-type detective work already applied to allegedly prove identity by matching up moles and birthmarks.
 
2014-09-03 12:26:46 AM  

TheGhostofFarkPast: This vector to make the attack was a simple phishing exercise which people fall into all the time.


Yup. One of the most common attacks covered in their tutorial was to send a fake but official looking email to the user and get them to hand over the answers to the security questions they set up. This let the attackers change their password.

dl.dropboxusercontent.com
 
2014-09-03 12:27:55 AM  

Mr. Eugenides: You can audit and lock out accounts where attacks are taking place.


You can't audit and lock out phishing attacks.
 
2014-09-03 12:45:50 AM  
Hey.Here's an idea. Don't take nekkid pictures of yourself and if you do don't put them anywhere near a connected device. Long before iWhatevers and half human half robot phones if you wanted to take nekkid pictures you had three options. Polaroids, skeevy film developing places that advertized "Discretion" or a thousand bucks worth of developing gear and a minor in chemistry (well, ok, not a minor but you did need to know how the chemicals worked).

Then again the common good advice was don't put anything in a letter that you wouldn't want to see in your local newspaper. Old people had this stuff figured out decades ago.
 
2014-09-03 12:47:03 AM  
Anyone else get the feeling the hack was an inside job?
 
2014-09-03 12:59:47 AM  
We only care because [famous] women were affected.
 
2014-09-03 01:03:14 AM  

Tourney3p0: I don't think it's close at all.  The entire premise is a "weak password", but that's not at all what happened.  To claim otherwise is to sweep a pretty big problem under the rug, a problem that most vendors have solved long ago.


Bullshiat.  This problem is not solved by -any- company.  Accounts get popped all the time.  Sometimes its because the user chose a weak password and was specifically targeted (frequently by an ex).  Other times its because another network was breached and was not properly protecting their passwords.  So every e-mail address and password gets used against a whole bunch of other sites.  There are ways to deal with this issue but they all come with advantages and disadvantages and you just have to chose what makes the best sense for your business model.

/works for a competitor
 
2014-09-03 01:17:44 AM  
iFapped
 
2014-09-03 01:44:51 AM  

Radioactive Ass: Hey.Here's an idea. Don't take nekkid pictures of yourself and if you do don't put them anywhere near a connected device.


Yeah that advice really worked out for Rob Lowe
 
2014-09-03 01:58:25 AM  

ox45tallboy: You have got to be kidding. Apple is seriously in "blame the victim" mode here? They're saying it's not their fault, the users should have had stronger passwords? And yet they allowed the users to use these passwords?



When you possibly have a class action lawsuit with 40 or so high profile, high net worth individuals; what do you expect?  They're already going to be the focus of a federal investigation and fines for break of customer data on top of any private lawsuits brought by the best lawyers that money can buy.

They're not going to publicly admit liability.
 
2014-09-03 06:49:10 AM  

ramblinwreck: We only care because [famous] women were affected.


Pretty much. It's like when suddenly bullying on Twitter was a huge scourge because Zelda Williams had her feelings hurt.
 
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  4. Click here to submit a link.

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