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(Guardian)   Stonehenge maintenance crew whose watering snafu led to brown patches of grass may have accidentally solved major mystery about site. "Not being archaeologists, we called in the professionals"   (theguardian.com) divider line 73
    More: Ironic  
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10403 clicks; posted to Geek » on 02 Sep 2014 at 4:14 PM (37 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-09-02 02:09:07 PM  
So, nobody ever though to haul a ground penetrating radar at the site?
 
2014-09-02 02:10:21 PM  
In ancient times...
Hundreds of years before the dawn of history,
Lived a strange race of people... the Druids

No one knows who they were or what they were doing,
But their legacy remains,
Hewn into the living rock...
Of Stonehenge
 
2014-09-02 02:11:32 PM  

TsarTom: In ancient times...
Hundreds of years before the dawn of history,
Lived a strange race of people... the Druids

No one knows who they were or what they were doing,
But their legacy remains,
Hewn into the living rock...
Of Stonehenge


img.fark.net
 
2014-09-02 02:42:45 PM  
They water the f*cking grass at Stonehenge?!?!?!
 
2014-09-02 02:44:00 PM  
People get so worked up over shiat like this. I mean, what else was there to do thousands of years ago when all they had were rocks to pile here and there, and then fap to a solstice or equinox?
 
2014-09-02 03:00:28 PM  

markie_farkie: People get so worked up over shiat like this. I mean, what else was there to do thousands of years ago when all they had were rocks to pile here and there, and then fap to a solstice or equinox?


Fap to Equinox?

4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-09-02 03:30:44 PM  
I find it highly unlikely, on earth that has been disturbed untold times over the centuries, that grass that is discoloured reflects anything other than those disturbances.
 
2014-09-02 04:25:16 PM  

dittybopper: So, nobody ever though to haul a ground penetrating radar at the site?


I recently read an article on precisely that subject. They are doing an extensive survey of the whole Stonehenge landscape using drag-behind subsurface scanners and the preliminary reports are just beginning to show up.

I don't know that the equipment they are using can be used that close to the monument because they are kind of bulky, but they have found half a dozen new sites in the area and are working on developing the ancient context in which the monument was erected.
 
2014-09-02 04:25:58 PM  

Go Fast Turn Left: TsarTom: In ancient times...
Hundreds of years before the dawn of history,
Lived a strange race of people... the Druids

No one knows who they were or what they were doing,
But their legacy remains,
Hewn into the living rock...
Of Stonehenge

[img.fark.net image 500x266]


Right here, it's specified, it's 18 inches.

www.skierpage.com
 
2014-09-02 04:27:17 PM  

unyon: I find it highly unlikely, on earth that has been disturbed untold times over the centuries, that grass that is discoloured reflects anything other than those disturbances.


That would be why they called in the professionals, to determine if the soil disturbances are the same age as the monument or if they come from more recent excavations.
 
2014-09-02 04:28:34 PM  
The Brits and their gardens.
 
2014-09-02 04:30:01 PM  
Live the term hosepipe. It just seems so very British.
 
2014-09-02 04:31:19 PM  

cgraves67: dittybopper: So, nobody ever though to haul a ground penetrating radar at the site?

I recently read an article on precisely that subject. They are doing an extensive survey of the whole Stonehenge landscape using drag-behind subsurface scanners and the preliminary reports are just beginning to show up.

I don't know that the equipment they are using can be used that close to the monument because they are kind of bulky, but they have found half a dozen new sites in the area and are working on developing the ancient context in which the monument was erected.


How long until they figure out the ancient druids were just farking with us?
 
2014-09-02 04:35:58 PM  

TsarTom: Of Stonehenge


It's where the banshees live and they do live well.
 
2014-09-02 04:36:52 PM  
You would think the Scott's would be better at lawn care.
 
2014-09-02 04:37:54 PM  

NorthernMT: Live the term hosepipe. It just seems so very British.


I blame the Scots for modern water-sucking lawns and golf.
 
2014-09-02 04:43:44 PM  
FTFA: "Susan Greaney, senior properties historian for English Heritage, said the accidental discovery was "really significant" and added: "It shows us just how much we still have to learn about Stonehenge. It's great that people who know the site really well and look at it every day were able to spot these parch marks and recognise them for what they were." "


Look, I don't mean to be flippant, but what exactly is really significant here?  How will this have any impact on anything, ever?
 
2014-09-02 04:45:11 PM  

redflag: Look, I don't mean to be flippant, but what exactly is really significant here? How will this have any impact on anything, ever?


It won't, just go back to watching "Keeping Up With The Kardashians".
 
2014-09-02 04:45:38 PM  

the_cnidarian: You would think the Scott's would be better at lawn care.


Water your Stonehenge.  Water it.
 
2014-09-02 04:48:40 PM  

redflag: FTFA: "Susan Greaney, senior properties historian for English Heritage, said the accidental discovery was "really significant" and added: "It shows us just how much we still have to learn about Stonehenge. It's great that people who know the site really well and look at it every day were able to spot these parch marks and recognise them for what they were." "


Look, I don't mean to be flippant, but what exactly is really significant here?  How will this have any impact on anything, ever?


If you were using Stonehenge just as an observatory for the planets, moon, and stars only observable seasonally, you would not need a complete circle.  An arc enabling observations in a band above and below the celestial equator would be sufficient.  A circular Stonehenge means something else or something more was going on.
 
2014-09-02 04:49:41 PM  

Metastatic Capricorn: redflag: FTFA: "Susan Greaney, senior properties historian for English Heritage, said the accidental discovery was "really significant" and added: "It shows us just how much we still have to learn about Stonehenge. It's great that people who know the site really well and look at it every day were able to spot these parch marks and recognise them for what they were." "


Look, I don't mean to be flippant, but what exactly is really significant here?  How will this have any impact on anything, ever?

If you were using Stonehenge just as an observatory for the planets, moon, and stars only observable seasonally, you would not need a complete circle.  An arc enabling observations in a band above and below the celestial equator would be sufficient.  A circular Stonehenge means something else or something more was going on.


Should, of course, have had the sun on that list of bodies.
 
2014-09-02 04:51:16 PM  

redflag: FTFA: "Susan Greaney, senior properties historian for English Heritage, said the accidental discovery was "really significant" and added: "It shows us just how much we still have to learn about Stonehenge. It's great that people who know the site really well and look at it every day were able to spot these parch marks and recognise them for what they were." "


Look, I don't mean to be flippant, but what exactly is really significant here?  How will this have any impact on anything, ever?


Agreed. It's pseudoscience at best.

And the majority of people who study Stonehenge already knew this, just couldn't prove it definitively. And this isn't definitive either. So, really a non-story.
 
2014-09-02 04:53:08 PM  

redflag: FTFA: "Susan Greaney, senior properties historian for English Heritage, said the accidental discovery was "really significant" and added: "It shows us just how much we still have to learn about Stonehenge. It's great that people who know the site really well and look at it every day were able to spot these parch marks and recognise them for what they were." "


Look, I don't mean to be flippant, but what exactly is really significant here?  How will this have any impact on anything, ever?


You mean besides the entire point of archaeology? To gain a deeper understanding of our ancestors and their culture.

/What the point of researching quantum mechanics?
//To learn.
///  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vxxiS4m9OSg
 
2014-09-02 04:57:50 PM  
Cymbal:  Agreed. It's pseudoscience at best.

Um, no.  Read a book.  In fact, read this one.  It will give you a good idea of just how not pseudoscience it is.

bks2.books.google.com
 
2014-09-02 04:58:31 PM  

unyon: I find it highly unlikely, on earth that has been disturbed untold times over the centuries, that grass that is discoloured reflects anything other than those disturbances.


I'm hoping that some Fark scientist can explain it better, but best I can figure through egregious uninformed speculation is that the ground under where the stones sat would be more densely packed than the ground around it due to the weight. Even if the top soil (the part that gets walked on regularly) is uniform throughout the site, the roots of the grass may not be able to penetrate the densely packed earth where the stones stood. The grass in those areas would be entirely dependent on the nutrients and water held in the top soil, whereas the grass throughout the rest of the site could penetrate into deeper soil, being less reliant on regular watering.
 
2014-09-02 05:03:38 PM  
We didn't think it was round before?
Also aliens.
 
2014-09-02 05:05:53 PM  

Mad_Radhu: NorthernMT: Live the term hosepipe. It just seems so very British.

I blame the Scots for modern water-sucking lawns and golf.


I blame the Normans.
 
2014-09-02 05:24:44 PM  

Metastatic Capricorn: If you were using Stonehenge just as an observatory for the planets, moon, and stars only observable seasonally, you would not need a complete circle. An arc enabling observations in a band above and below the celestial equator would be sufficient. A circular Stonehenge means something else or something more was going on.

Should, of course, have had the sun on that list of bodies.


You did.
 
2014-09-02 05:25:15 PM  

dittybopper: markie_farkie: People get so worked up over shiat like this. I mean, what else was there to do thousands of years ago when all they had were rocks to pile here and there, and then fap to a solstice or equinox?

Fap to Equinox?

[4.bp.blogspot.com image 400x300]


upload.wikimedia.org
Some people fap to the strangest things...
 
2014-09-02 05:31:46 PM  

InterruptingQuirk: Metastatic Capricorn: If you were using Stonehenge just as an observatory for the planets, moon, and stars only observable seasonally, you would not need a complete circle. An arc enabling observations in a band above and below the celestial equator would be sufficient. A circular Stonehenge means something else or something more was going on.

Should, of course, have had the sun on that list of bodies.

You did.


Thanks, but at that latitude the sun is not below the horizon at local apparent noon in any season.
 
2014-09-02 05:33:08 PM  

InterruptingQuirk: Metastatic Capricorn: If you were using Stonehenge just as an observatory for the planets, moon, and stars only observable seasonally, you would not need a complete circle. An arc enabling observations in a band above and below the celestial equator would be sufficient. A circular Stonehenge means something else or something more was going on.

Should, of course, have had the sun on that list of bodies.

You did.


You live very wow so north. Or south. Much penumbra.
 
2014-09-02 05:35:38 PM  

salvador.hardin: unyon: I find it highly unlikely, on earth that has been disturbed untold times over the centuries, that grass that is discoloured reflects anything other than those disturbances.

I'm hoping that some Fark scientist can explain it better, but best I can figure through egregious uninformed speculation is that the ground under where the stones sat would be more densely packed than the ground around it due to the weight. Even if the top soil (the part that gets walked on regularly) is uniform throughout the site, the roots of the grass may not be able to penetrate the densely packed earth where the stones stood. The grass in those areas would be entirely dependent on the nutrients and water held in the top soil, whereas the grass throughout the rest of the site could penetrate into deeper soil, being less reliant on regular watering.


Ask and ye shall receive.  They're called cropmarks.
 
2014-09-02 05:54:21 PM  

NorthernMT: Live the term hosepipe. It just seems so very British.


Apparently it's also a Southern US thing. Everyone around here calls them hope pipes.
 
2014-09-02 05:57:41 PM  

Gaddiel: redflag: FTFA: "Susan Greaney, senior properties historian for English Heritage, said the accidental discovery was "really significant" and added: "It shows us just how much we still have to learn about Stonehenge. It's great that people who know the site really well and look at it every day were able to spot these parch marks and recognise them for what they were." "


Look, I don't mean to be flippant, but what exactly is really significant here?  How will this have any impact on anything, ever?

You mean besides the entire point of archaeology? To gain a deeper understanding of our ancestors and their culture.

/What the point of researching quantum mechanics?
//To learn.
///  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vxxiS4m9OSg


So that's a long-winded way of saying, "no, there will be no real impact on humanity as a result of this discovery", then?
 
2014-09-02 06:01:40 PM  

Metastatic Capricorn: redflag: FTFA: "Susan Greaney, senior properties historian for English Heritage, said the accidental discovery was "really significant" and added: "It shows us just how much we still have to learn about Stonehenge. It's great that people who know the site really well and look at it every day were able to spot these parch marks and recognise them for what they were." "


Look, I don't mean to be flippant, but what exactly is really significant here?  How will this have any impact on anything, ever?

If you were using Stonehenge just as an observatory for the planets, moon, and stars only observable seasonally, you would not need a complete circle.  An arc enabling observations in a band above and below the celestial equator would be sufficient.  A circular Stonehenge means something else or something more was going on.


So you are saying that we might learn just how advanced our ancestor's understandings of astronomy were?  Seems like a gigantic waste of time to figure that out if it is unlikely to have any impact on modern astronomy. Are we trying to work backwards to the answer of some still unanswered question or something, or is it just a big circle jerk for Ph.D's working on state funds?
 
2014-09-02 06:03:30 PM  

PartTimeBuddha: InterruptingQuirk: Metastatic Capricorn: If you were using Stonehenge just as an observatory for the planets, moon, and stars only observable seasonally, you would not need a complete circle. An arc enabling observations in a band above and below the celestial equator would be sufficient. A circular Stonehenge means something else or something more was going on.

Should, of course, have had the sun on that list of bodies.

You did.

You live very wow so north. Or south. Much penumbra.


4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-09-02 06:05:03 PM  

theorellior: redflag: Look, I don't mean to be flippant, but what exactly is really significant here? How will this have any impact on anything, ever?

It won't, just go back to watching "Keeping Up With The Kardashians".


I know, rather than guess at an answer to a question to which I don't know the answer and risk looking dumb, I'll just throw in an ad hominem attack as a a way to side-step the question and seem smart.

/Yea, well go back to the jerk-store
//I heard they're running out
 
2014-09-02 06:11:43 PM  

redflag: Metastatic Capricorn: redflag: FTFA: "Susan Greaney, senior properties historian for English Heritage, said the accidental discovery was "really significant" and added: "It shows us just how much we still have to learn about Stonehenge. It's great that people who know the site really well and look at it every day were able to spot these parch marks and recognise them for what they were." "


Look, I don't mean to be flippant, but what exactly is really significant here?  How will this have any impact on anything, ever?

If you were using Stonehenge just as an observatory for the planets, moon, and stars only observable seasonally, you would not need a complete circle.  An arc enabling observations in a band above and below the celestial equator would be sufficient.  A circular Stonehenge means something else or something more was going on.

So you are saying that we might learn just how advanced our ancestor's understandings of astronomy were?  Seems like a gigantic waste of time to figure that out if it is unlikely to have any impact on modern astronomy. Are we trying to work backwards to the answer of some still unanswered question or something, or is it just a big circle jerk for Ph.D's working on state funds?


Well, if scientific and historical curiosity aren't enough for you, there's a serious economic argument.  The UK attracts droves of tourists who want to see Stonehenge, Avebury, Windsor, and many other piles of ancient rocks.  Their conservation and interpretation, though often underfunded, probably make the UK a fair amount of money.  Without them, it's just dark island where "damp" is a color.
 
2014-09-02 06:21:01 PM  

InterruptingQuirk: PartTimeBuddha: InterruptingQuirk: Metastatic Capricorn: If you were using Stonehenge just as an observatory for the planets, moon, and stars only observable seasonally, you would not need a complete circle. An arc enabling observations in a band above and below the celestial equator would be sufficient. A circular Stonehenge means something else or something more was going on.

Should, of course, have had the sun on that list of bodies.

You did.

You live very wow so north. Or south. Much penumbra.

[4.bp.blogspot.com image 399x330]


thank you for the dreams x
 
2014-09-02 06:42:33 PM  

cgraves67: dittybopper: So, nobody ever though to haul a ground penetrating radar at the site?

I recently read an article on precisely that subject. They are doing an extensive survey of the whole Stonehenge landscape using drag-behind subsurface scanners and the preliminary reports are just beginning to show up.

I don't know that the equipment they are using can be used that close to the monument because they are kind of bulky, but they have found half a dozen new sites in the area and are working on developing the ancient context in which the monument was erected.


Yeah, but GPR has been around for, what, three decades now? I would have thought that Stonehenge would have been a priority of some kind. I mean, it's either that or they've been writing the reports by chiseling them into a special stele that they plan to erect at the site or something.
 
2014-09-02 06:51:23 PM  

Metastatic Capricorn: redflag: Metastatic Capricorn: redflag: FTFA: "Susan Greaney, senior properties historian for English Heritage, said the accidental discovery was "really significant" and added: "It shows us just how much we still have to learn about Stonehenge. It's great that people who know the site really well and look at it every day were able to spot these parch marks and recognise them for what they were." "


Look, I don't mean to be flippant, but what exactly is really significant here?  How will this have any impact on anything, ever?

If you were using Stonehenge just as an observatory for the planets, moon, and stars only observable seasonally, you would not need a complete circle.  An arc enabling observations in a band above and below the celestial equator would be sufficient.  A circular Stonehenge means something else or something more was going on.

So you are saying that we might learn just how advanced our ancestor's understandings of astronomy were?  Seems like a gigantic waste of time to figure that out if it is unlikely to have any impact on modern astronomy. Are we trying to work backwards to the answer of some still unanswered question or something, or is it just a big circle jerk for Ph.D's working on state funds?

Well, if scientific and historical curiosity aren't enough for you, there's a serious economic argument.  The UK attracts droves of tourists who want to see Stonehenge, Avebury, Windsor, and many other piles of ancient rocks.  Their conservation and interpretation, though often underfunded, probably make the UK a fair amount of money.  Without them, it's just dark island where "damp" is a color.


Damp is a flavour too.
 
2014-09-02 06:59:17 PM  

NorthernMT: Live the term hosepipe. It just seems so very British.


Heh my girlfriend asked to if my mom had a hosepipe and I couldn't for the life of me figure out wth that was. I'm glad to know its an actual term and just not some weird Tennessee slang I never knew.
 
2014-09-02 07:29:00 PM  

dmarlar: NorthernMT: Live the term hosepipe. It just seems so very British.

Heh my girlfriend asked to if my mom had a hosepipe and I couldn't for the life of me figure out wth that was. I'm glad to know its an actual term and just not some weird Tennessee slang I never knew.


A hosepipe? I had wondered about her, but that explains a lot.
 
2014-09-02 07:52:18 PM  

redflag: Gaddiel: redflag: FTFA: "Susan Greaney, senior properties historian for English Heritage, said the accidental discovery was "really significant" and added: "It shows us just how much we still have to learn about Stonehenge. It's great that people who know the site really well and look at it every day were able to spot these parch marks and recognise them for what they were." "


Look, I don't mean to be flippant, but what exactly is really significant here?  How will this have any impact on anything, ever?

You mean besides the entire point of archaeology? To gain a deeper understanding of our ancestors and their culture.

/What the point of researching quantum mechanics?
//To learn.
///  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vxxiS4m9OSg

So that's a long-winded way of saying, "no, there will be no real impact on humanity as a result of this discovery", then?


Jesus farking christ, if you don't understand the importance of history and archaeology why are you even posting?

Your argument is akin to 'we shouldn't bother remembering what happened yesterday because it's in the past and we have the present to deal with'.
 
2014-09-02 08:10:24 PM  
Hmm. I wonder if they simply gave up moving those 50 ton rocks around after they figured out the circle turned out to be a oval.
 
2014-09-02 08:10:47 PM  
I love how these threads always bring out the people who think they know more than actual archaeologists. Or that they sound "cool" saying "meh, this was obvious".

Here's a thought: maybe your ignorance is not as good as their knowledge.
 
2014-09-02 08:11:56 PM  

Metastatic Capricorn: redflag: FTFA: "Susan Greaney, senior properties historian for English Heritage, said the accidental discovery was "really significant" and added: "It shows us just how much we still have to learn about Stonehenge. It's great that people who know the site really well and look at it every day were able to spot these parch marks and recognise them for what they were." "


Look, I don't mean to be flippant, but what exactly is really significant here?  How will this have any impact on anything, ever?

If you were using Stonehenge just as an observatory for the planets, moon, and stars only observable seasonally, you would not need a complete circle.  An arc enabling observations in a band above and below the celestial equator would be sufficient.  A circular Stonehenge means something else or something more was going on.


Or the guys in charge thought a circle would look cool.
 
2014-09-02 08:35:12 PM  

the_cnidarian: You would think the Scott's would be better at lawn care.


F--- your lawn!  F--- it!
 
2014-09-02 08:56:04 PM  

TsarTom: In ancient times...
Hundreds of years before the dawn of history,
Lived a strange race of people... the Druids

No one knows who they were or what they were doing,
But their legacy remains,
Hewn into the living rock...
Of Stonehenge


I always thought Stonehenge was a place where ancient aliens had human orifice probing parties and Intergalactic keggers.
 
2014-09-02 09:17:30 PM  

redflag: I know, rather than guess at an answer to a question to which I don't know the answer and risk looking dumb, I'll just throw in an ad hominem attack as a a way to side-step the question and seem smart.


You're one of those "angry at everything why won't you talk to me?" trolls, aren't you?

Bless your heart.
 
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