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(YouTube)   Missing Plane News Network informs us that "this 4Chan" is most likely a system administrator   (youtube.com) divider line 84
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3215 clicks; posted to Video » on 02 Sep 2014 at 12:45 PM (25 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-09-02 09:01:42 AM  
How do you become a "technology analyst" and not know what 4chan is? CNN is such a joke.
 
2014-09-02 09:05:46 AM  
I understand they have to break it down to simple levels so the average viewer can understand but holy shiat that was pure cringe and obvious he really doesn't have a single idea what he's talking about.
 
2014-09-02 09:07:48 AM  

styckx: I understand they have to break it down to simple levels so the average viewer can understand but holy shiat that was pure cringe and obvious he really doesn't have a single idea what he's talking about.


Now, what makes you think they know anything more about other subjects that you aren't as competent in?

"Briefly stated, the Gell-Mann Amnesia effect is as follows. You open the newspaper to an article on some subject you know well. In Murray's case, physics. In mine, show business. You read the article and see the journalist has absolutely no understanding of either the facts or the issues. Often, the article is so wrong it actually presents the story backward-reversing cause and effect. I call these the "wet streets cause rain" stories. Paper's full of them.

In any case, you read with exasperation or amusement the multiple errors in a story, and then turn the page to national or international affairs, and read as if the rest of the newspaper was somehow more accurate about Palestine than the baloney you just read. You turn the page, and forget what you know."

― Michael Crichton
 
2014-09-02 09:14:33 AM  

dittybopper: styckx: I understand they have to break it down to simple levels so the average viewer can understand but holy shiat that was pure cringe and obvious he really doesn't have a single idea what he's talking about.

Now, what makes you think they know anything more about other subjects that you aren't as competent in?

"Briefly stated, the Gell-Mann Amnesia effect is as follows. You open the newspaper to an article on some subject you know well. In Murray's case, physics. In mine, show business. You read the article and see the journalist has absolutely no understanding of either the facts or the issues. Often, the article is so wrong it actually presents the story backward-reversing cause and effect. I call these the "wet streets cause rain" stories. Paper's full of them.

In any case, you read with exasperation or amusement the multiple errors in a story, and then turn the page to national or international affairs, and read as if the rest of the newspaper was somehow more accurate about Palestine than the baloney you just read. You turn the page, and forget what you know."

― Michael Crichton


Couldn't agree with his assessment more.  Very sad..
 
2014-09-02 09:16:57 AM  
It is sad.  And we all joke about it, but even though I try to spread the idea of Gell-Mann Amnesia, I'm a victim of it myself.  Every so often I'll catch myself, but often, I don't.  I accept what I read as, well, perhaps not gospel, but I'm not as skeptical as I'd like to be.
 
2014-09-02 09:17:37 AM  

dittybopper: styckx: I understand they have to break it down to simple levels so the average viewer can understand but holy shiat that was pure cringe and obvious he really doesn't have a single idea what he's talking about.

Now, what makes you think they know anything more about other subjects that you aren't as competent in?

"Briefly stated, the Gell-Mann Amnesia effect is as follows. You open the newspaper to an article on some subject you know well. In Murray's case, physics. In mine, show business. You read the article and see the journalist has absolutely no understanding of either the facts or the issues. Often, the article is so wrong it actually presents the story backward-reversing cause and effect. I call these the "wet streets cause rain" stories. Paper's full of them.

In any case, you read with exasperation or amusement the multiple errors in a story, and then turn the page to national or international affairs, and read as if the rest of the newspaper was somehow more accurate about Palestine than the baloney you just read. You turn the page, and forget what you know."

― Michael Crichton


As I like to say, if they were actually experts in the subjects they were writing about, they wouldn't be journalists.
 
2014-09-02 09:18:16 AM  
And I could say the same thing about most career politicians.
 
2014-09-02 09:23:09 AM  

dittybopper: It is sad.  And we all joke about it, but even though I try to spread the idea of Gell-Mann Amnesia, I'm a victim of it myself.  Every so often I'll catch myself, but often, I don't.  I accept what I read as, well, perhaps not gospel, but I'm not as skeptical as I'd like to be.


Often if it's a subject I'm interested in I'm just trained now to read multiple sources first and accept the truth probably falls somewhere in the middle. Even then I still cast doubt because even through multiple sources often the presentation is similar.
 
2014-09-02 09:31:54 AM  

Incorrigible Astronaut: How do you become a "technology analyst" and not know what 4chan is? CNN is such a joke.


I think when I wanted to cockpunch this guy is when he said 'if your password is password, change the 's' to a dollar sign'.

Although I did enjoy the female reporters body language as they were discussing this.  I'm almost sure that she's thinking back to her own drunken photo shoot.  Which I would love to see, consensually of course.
 
2014-09-02 09:32:49 AM  

Incorrigible Astronaut: How do you become a "technology analyst" and not know what 4chan is? CNN is such a joke.


No shiat (they were apparently doing a site update this weekend, btw).

I know he has to dumb it down for retards but damn.  And it's a "dictionary attack" Mr News Guy!

What is funny is they never tell you the best way to keep your damn photos out of the "cloud" - turn off your cloud connection!...At least for your photos.  Photos should *only* be saved locally, especially if you're going to take private pics.  Learn to use File Explorer and a damn USB cable.
 
2014-09-02 09:37:11 AM  

Incorrigible Astronaut: How do you become a "technology analyst" and not know what 4chan is? CNN is such a joke.


Probably with a degree from either a match book of PSU.
 
2014-09-02 09:44:15 AM  

Incorrigible Astronaut: How do you become a "technology analyst" and not know what 4chan is? CNN is such a joke.


They hired this guy.

verybadfrog.com
 
2014-09-02 09:51:16 AM  

vudukungfu: Incorrigible Astronaut: How do you become a "technology analyst" and not know what 4chan is? CNN is such a joke.

Probably with a degree from either a match book of PSU.


I mean, even if the guy was the "backyard weed killer analyst" the day before, you'd think that he could at least run whatever he was talking about through Google first. That was just painful.
 
2014-09-02 09:52:31 AM  
CNN should know not to mention 4chan to it's audience. Some grandma will stumble onto it and either have a heart attack or start forwarding the most disturbing shiat to her grandchildren.
 
2014-09-02 09:57:24 AM  

dittybopper: "Briefly stated, the Gell-Mann Amnesia effect is as follows. You open the newspaper to an article on some subject you know well. In Murray's case, physics. In mine, show business. You read the article and see the journalist has absolutely no understanding of either the facts or the issues.


Oddly enough it is getting better... but only because there are so few journalist these days that any blog writer or PR department can send in a story and it might get printed.  A local newspaper used to hire 200 writers and they are now down to 18.
 
2014-09-02 10:01:05 AM  
holy shiat, they're on to me....
 
2014-09-02 10:08:41 AM  
"Cloud"

DRINK!
 
2014-09-02 10:17:44 AM  

SlothB77: "Cloud"

DRINK!


What makes me cringe is that the term "cloud" was dubbed to make  "remote file server"  more palatable to the average person.. Yet..Somehow... No one knows how to accurately describe this "cloud"..  It's as if we should just go back to, you know calling it what it is.. A remote file server.
 
2014-09-02 10:47:57 AM  

styckx: SlothB77: "Cloud"

DRINK!

What makes me cringe is that the term "cloud" was dubbed to make  "remote file server"  more palatable to the average person.. Yet..Somehow... No one knows how to accurately describe this "cloud"..  It's as if we should just go back to, you know calling it what it is.. A remote file server.


Quantum data. Virtualized data published on virtualized file servers stored on a virtualized SAN accessed via a virtualized network.

You think know where your data is? You're wrong.
 
2014-09-02 10:50:53 AM  

GardenWeasel: styckx: SlothB77: "Cloud"

DRINK!

What makes me cringe is that the term "cloud" was dubbed to make  "remote file server"  more palatable to the average person.. Yet..Somehow... No one knows how to accurately describe this "cloud"..  It's as if we should just go back to, you know calling it what it is.. A remote file server.

Quantum data. Virtualized data published on virtualized file servers stored on a virtualized SAN accessed via a virtualized network.

You think know where your data is? You're wrong.



If I know where my data is, I have no idea what it is. It's physics.
 
2014-09-02 10:52:45 AM  

styckx: dittybopper: It is sad.  And we all joke about it, but even though I try to spread the idea of Gell-Mann Amnesia, I'm a victim of it myself.  Every so often I'll catch myself, but often, I don't.  I accept what I read as, well, perhaps not gospel, but I'm not as skeptical as I'd like to be.

Often if it's a subject I'm interested in I'm just trained now to read multiple sources first and accept the truth probably falls somewhere in the middle. Even then I still cast doubt because even through multiple sources often the presentation is similar.


Even then, it's a crap-shoot.

Often, journalists are just as subject to "group think" as other populations.  They have certain institutional biases (not political, necessarily) that make them look at issues in a certain way.

For an example that isn't in any way related to any subject that I might have some serious knowledge about, take the issue of hunger in the US.   It's often reported that we have a serious problem with "food insecurity", and yet we as a nation are facing an obesity crisis, especially among the poor (and especially poor women):
www.prb.org

Hardly anyone in the United States starves to death:
http://www.worldlifeexpectancy.com/cause-of-death/malnutrition/by-co un try/
Our rate of malnutrition deaths is on par with much of Western Europe.

But you never really hear that in the news media.  Instead, we hear statistics about "food deserts", "food insecurity", and how some percentage of the population is in danger of not getting enough calories.  They'll focus on some poor family that hit a run of bad luck (or poor decision making) and ended up having to go to bed hungry, visit the local food pantry, or having to cut back on their weekly grocery shopping to make ends meet, because that's a human face to the issue.  It's something that people can latch on to emotionally.

But putting a human face on an issue can often lead to a very bad misunderstanding of the scope and nature of the issue itself.   How many people do you know who have involuntarily starved to death, or died of malnutrition in the United States?  I don't know anyone like that.  Chances are, neither do you, and in fact the statistics tell us that it's actually a vanishingly small problem that is well taken care of.  If it were not, then we'd see a significant number of malnutrition related deaths, and we don't in fact see that.

And that's an example of an institutional bias of the press that isn't even intentional.  It's *EASY* to make a human interest story engaging.  It's much harder to make dry numbers sound exciting enough to attract readers/viewers, even if you can get a much, much better understanding of what problems we should be concentrating on by using accurate statistics instead of human interest stories.
 
2014-09-02 10:53:44 AM  

UberDave: Incorrigible Astronaut: How do you become a "technology analyst" and not know what 4chan is? CNN is such a joke.

No shiat (they were apparently doing a site update this weekend, btw).

I know he has to dumb it down for retards but damn.  And it's a "dictionary attack" Mr News Guy!

What is funny is they never tell you the best way to keep your damn photos out of the "cloud" - turn off your cloud connection!...At least for your photos.  Photos should *only* be saved locally, especially if you're going to take private pics.  Learn to use File Explorer and a damn USB cable.


Only save photos locally? What horrible advice. What happens if your house burns down or your laptop gets stolen? Always back your pics up to the cloud I say. Just not nudes of you.
 
2014-09-02 10:56:44 AM  

GardenWeasel: styckx: SlothB77: "Cloud"

DRINK!

What makes me cringe is that the term "cloud" was dubbed to make  "remote file server"  more palatable to the average person.. Yet..Somehow... No one knows how to accurately describe this "cloud"..  It's as if we should just go back to, you know calling it what it is.. A remote file server.

Quantum data. Virtualized data published on virtualized file servers stored on a virtualized SAN accessed via a virtualized network.

You think know where your data is? You're wrong.


I know exactly where it is:

imgs.xkcd.com
 
2014-09-02 10:57:20 AM  

Walker: UberDave: Incorrigible Astronaut: How do you become a "technology analyst" and not know what 4chan is? CNN is such a joke.

No shiat (they were apparently doing a site update this weekend, btw).

I know he has to dumb it down for retards but damn.  And it's a "dictionary attack" Mr News Guy!

What is funny is they never tell you the best way to keep your damn photos out of the "cloud" - turn off your cloud connection!...At least for your photos.  Photos should *only* be saved locally, especially if you're going to take private pics.  Learn to use File Explorer and a damn USB cable.

Only save photos locally? What horrible advice. What happens if your house burns down or your laptop gets stolen? Always back your pics up to the cloud I say. Just not nudes of you.



I store my nude pics with computer-generated clothes, and keep the clothes-removal key on a thumb drive.
 
2014-09-02 11:10:15 AM  
Dumb man yells about cloud
 
2014-09-02 11:10:41 AM  
I want James Earl Jones saying "This is MPNN"
 
2014-09-02 11:13:06 AM  

dittybopper: styckx: dittybopper: It is sad.  And we all joke about it, but even though I try to spread the idea of Gell-Mann Amnesia, I'm a victim of it myself.  Every so often I'll catch myself, but often, I don't.  I accept what I read as, well, perhaps not gospel, but I'm not as skeptical as I'd like to be.

Often if it's a subject I'm interested in I'm just trained now to read multiple sources first and accept the truth probably falls somewhere in the middle. Even then I still cast doubt because even through multiple sources often the presentation is similar.

Even then, it's a crap-shoot.

Often, journalists are just as subject to "group think" as other populations.  They have certain institutional biases (not political, necessarily) that make them look at issues in a certain way.

For an example that isn't in any way related to any subject that I might have some serious knowledge about, take the issue of hunger in the US.   It's often reported that we have a serious problem with "food insecurity", and yet we as a nation are facing an obesity crisis, especially among the poor (and especially poor women):
[www.prb.org image 580x398]

Hardly anyone in the United States starves to death:
http://www.worldlifeexpectancy.com/cause-of-death/malnutrition/by-co un try/
Our rate of malnutrition deaths is on par with much of Western Europe.

But you never really hear that in the news media.   Instead, we hear statistics about "food deserts", "food insecurity", and how some percentage of the population is in danger of not getting enough calories.  They'll focus on some poor family that hit a run of bad luck (or poor decision making) and ended up having to go to bed hungry, visit the local food pantry, or having to cut back on their weekly grocery shopping to make ends meet, because that's a human face to the issue.  It's something that people can latch on to emotionally.

But putting a human face on an issue can often lead to a very bad misunderstanding of the scope and nature of the i ...


Every time I've ever heard a story about "food deserts", it was in the context of poor people not being able to afford/not having access to healthy/fresh food, thus triggering obesity, as the 7-11 is the local grocery.  Just thought I'd point that out.
 
2014-09-02 11:14:42 AM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Dumb man yells about cloud


Perhaps if we pulled data from these clouds with something. We couldn't use a big truck, but perhaps a series of tubes...
 
2014-09-02 11:19:45 AM  
img1.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2014-09-02 11:29:48 AM  

DjangoStonereaver: [img1.wikia.nocookie.net image 600x458]


Sex and Violence and Rock-N-Roll?
 
2014-09-02 11:40:14 AM  
I thought 4-Chan was the son that convinced Charlie to get a vasectomy.
 
2014-09-02 11:50:04 AM  

Three Crooked Squirrels: Every time I've ever heard a story about "food deserts", it was in the context of poor people not being able to afford/not having access to healthy/fresh food, thus triggering obesity, as the 7-11 is the local grocery.  Just thought I'd point that out.


But that's kind of my point:  It's not that people don't have access to adequate caloric intake.  Now were arguing about healthy foods.

And in fact, the food desert thing isn't as bad as it's made out to be.  I allegedly live just over the line from one such "food desert" according to the USDA.  It's a "Low Income and Low Access 1/2 mile to 10 mile" alleged "food desert".

One problem:  That "food desert" starts right across the road from a supermarket.  The majority of that "1/2 mile to 10 mile" food desert is literally less than 1/2 a mile from a clean, very well-stocked Hannaford supermarket.   The low-income public housing is a bare 6/10ths of a mile from the supermarket, easy walking distance for all but the handicapped.   At it's closest point, it's 123 yards from the border of that food desert to the front entrance to the supermarket, and that's almost all parking lot.  Oh, and the road is a 30 MPH city street with stoplights and crosswalks, so it's not like people have to cross a superhighway to get there.

I checked on Google Earth just to make sure my measurements were correct.

Even by the original standard of "low income and 1 to 10 miles", in the town I used to live in there is a smaller, but well-stocked grocery store within a quarter of a mile of one of those "LI and LA 1 to 10 mile" food deserts.  That means that for at least 3/4ths of a mile from the border of the food desert closest to that store, it's bullshiat.  Meaningless.  Because the metric is *WRONG*.

And that's just my local area.

So I have to conclude that the concept of the food desert, while not entirely without merit, has been expanded to include areas that aren't actually food deserts by even their own definition.

If you're interested, you can check out your local "food deserts" and see if they actually qualify:
http://www.ers.usda.gov/data-products/food-access-research-atlas/go- to -the-atlas.aspx#.VAXnIPldWSo
 
2014-09-02 12:12:46 PM  

Arkanaut: As I like to say, if they were actually experts in the subjects they were writing about, they wouldn't be journalists.


More often than not that tends to be the case, but not always. I think part of the problem is that we consider "journalism" to be its own academic discipline when it really should be a subset of whatever areas you want to dedicate yourself to reporting. I cannot stand to read articles on Supreme Court cases as they get handed down because in the rush, someone with no legal education bangs out some sloppy article that gets crucial elements all wrong. There is such a glut of JDs out there, surely they could start hiring legal beat reporters from those ranks. The same with science, international relations - get a degree in that, minor in journalism, and get to work.
 
2014-09-02 12:19:23 PM  
i.imgur.com
 
2014-09-02 12:26:39 PM  

Incorrigible Astronaut: How do you become a "technology analyst" and not know what 4chan is? CNN is such a joke.


Word. Even the Daily Show has a "Senior technology analyst".
 
2014-09-02 12:35:56 PM  

dittybopper: But that's kind of my point: It's not that people don't have access to adequate caloric intake. Now were arguing about healthy foods.


I was merely pointing out that you said that you take obesity as a serious issue, but lumped together stories about food deserts with reporting on people not having adequate caloric intake or going to bed hungry.  The stories I have heard about food deserts are about obesity, not going to bed hungry or lack of caloric intake.
 
2014-09-02 12:51:07 PM  
pbs.twimg.com
 
2014-09-02 12:58:48 PM  

Three Crooked Squirrels: dittybopper: But that's kind of my point: It's not that people don't have access to adequate caloric intake. Now were arguing about healthy foods.

I was merely pointing out that you said that you take obesity as a serious issue, but lumped together stories about food deserts with reporting on people not having adequate caloric intake or going to bed hungry.  The stories I have heard about food deserts are about obesity, not going to bed hungry or lack of caloric intake.


Despite the sidetrack, my main point was that the media has an institutional bias in putting a human face to a tragedy when in fact that can be very misleading about the prevalence of the problem.

On the sidetrack, though, the food deserts aren't actually what they say they are.  I pointed out that two official USDA "food deserts" in my area are largely bullshiat, because apparently someone can't use Google Earth to find a large farkin' supermarket just a bit over 100 yards from one of them.
 
2014-09-02 01:06:34 PM  

dittybopper: Three Crooked Squirrels: dittybopper: But that's kind of my point: It's not that people don't have access to adequate caloric intake. Now were arguing about healthy foods.

I was merely pointing out that you said that you take obesity as a serious issue, but lumped together stories about food deserts with reporting on people not having adequate caloric intake or going to bed hungry.  The stories I have heard about food deserts are about obesity, not going to bed hungry or lack of caloric intake.

Despite the sidetrack, my main point was that the media has an institutional bias in putting a human face to a tragedy when in fact that can be very misleading about the prevalence of the problem.

On the sidetrack, though, the food deserts aren't actually what they say they are.  I pointed out that two official USDA "food deserts" in my area are largely bullshiat, because apparently someone can't use Google Earth to find a large farkin' supermarket just a bit over 100 yards from one of them.


I don't live in a food desert and I won't take issue with your anecdotal account.  Just that I've never heard a food desert story that didn't talk about obesity.  That's all.
 
2014-09-02 01:19:11 PM  
 
2014-09-02 01:20:27 PM  

Incorrigible Astronaut: How do you become a "technology analyst" and not know what 4chan is?


www.mrbrown.com
 
2014-09-02 01:29:42 PM  

dittybopper: If you're interested, you can check out your local "food deserts" and see if they actually qualify:
http://www.ers.usda.gov/data-products/food-access-research-atlas/go- to -the-atlas.aspx#.VAXnIPldWSo


Wow... they consider my house in a food desert!   That's so inaccurate.  Yes, the local stores I can walk to within a few blocks are a Dollar General and a few corner stores.   But I can easily find healthy stuff there if I want.  Yeah, I can buy junk food anywhere- like everyone.  But for the same cost, if I choose to, I can buy healthy stuff.  All without a car, and all not too expensive.
 
2014-09-02 01:33:56 PM  

Incorrigible Astronaut: How do you become a "technology analyst" and not know what 4chan is? CNN is such a joke.


a guy I used to work with started his own "computer doctor" business.  somehow he was brought on to one of the local new stations as the computer expert.  Awhile back, they were doing a report on the "ransomware" virus thing.  ("we've encrypted your data.  pay us for the password.")  His advise on the air was to pay the ransom......
 
2014-09-02 01:34:28 PM  

styckx: dittybopper: styckx: I understand they have to break it down to simple levels so the average viewer can understand but holy shiat that was pure cringe and obvious he really doesn't have a single idea what he's talking about.

Now, what makes you think they know anything more about other subjects that you aren't as competent in?

"Briefly stated, the Gell-Mann Amnesia effect is as follows. You open the newspaper to an article on some subject you know well. In Murray's case, physics. In mine, show business. You read the article and see the journalist has absolutely no understanding of either the facts or the issues. Often, the article is so wrong it actually presents the story backward-reversing cause and effect. I call these the "wet streets cause rain" stories. Paper's full of them.

In any case, you read with exasperation or amusement the multiple errors in a story, and then turn the page to national or international affairs, and read as if the rest of the newspaper was somehow more accurate about Palestine than the baloney you just read. You turn the page, and forget what you know."

― Michael Crichton

Couldn't agree with his assessment more.  Very sad..


Thirded.  Maybe already has been.
 
2014-09-02 01:36:10 PM  
They spelled it wrong: It's actually For Chan who was co-pilot to Sum Ting Wong.
 
2014-09-02 01:37:33 PM  

dittybopper: It is sad.  And we all joke about it, but even though I try to spread the idea of Gell-Mann Amnesia, I'm a victim of it myself.  Every so often I'll catch myself, but often, I don't.  I accept what I read as, well, perhaps not gospel, but I'm not as skeptical as I'd like to be.


Watch how you use that word on FARK, especially in a GW thread.

"You're not a proper skeptic.  You know nothing of true skepticism."  Can't remember which idiot FARKer told me that.
 
2014-09-02 01:39:52 PM  

rkiller1: They spelled it wrong: It's actually For Chan who was co-pilot to Sum Ting Wong.


Bang Ding Ow.
 
2014-09-02 02:02:52 PM  
Wait, you mean... Brooke Baldwin is not a genius??

Here are 2 videos I uploaded of Brooke Baldwin not being a genius...

1.

2.
 
2014-09-02 02:13:39 PM  

dittybopper: It's often reported that we have a serious problem with "food insecurity", and yet we as a nation are facing an obesity crisis


The insecurity is mainly a problem with GOOD food.  The problem with food deserts is entirely GOOD food.  The processed shiat is much more available than the fresh stuff.  The areas that don't have full grocery stores still have shiatty food available nearby in the convenient store.  The people who are reliant on charity for food are mainly getting stuff with a long shelf life, which means lots of shiatty stuff.

And of course the other part of the obesity equation is exercise.  If you're poor, you don't have the time or money to go to the gym or get the equipment and supplements and other stuff like that and your neighborhoods aren't safe enough to go outside.  And their lives are more stressful because of the poverty which means more people being physically exhausted without getting much exercise, especially if like a lot of poor people you have a job with lots of standing and little movement like a clerk.
 
2014-09-02 02:20:20 PM  

dittybopper: Three Crooked Squirrels: Every time I've ever heard a story about "food deserts", it was in the context of poor people not being able to afford/not having access to healthy/fresh food, thus triggering obesity, as the 7-11 is the local grocery.  Just thought I'd point that out.

But that's kind of my point:  It's not that people don't have access to adequate caloric intake.  Now were arguing about healthy foods.

And in fact, the food desert thing isn't as bad as it's made out to be.  I allegedly live just over the line from one such "food desert" according to the USDA.  It's a "Low Income and Low Access 1/2 mile to 10 mile" alleged "food desert".

One problem:  That "food desert" starts right across the road from a supermarket.  The majority of that "1/2 mile to 10 mile" food desert is literally less than 1/2 a mile from a clean, very well-stocked Hannaford supermarket.   The low-income public housing is a bare 6/10ths of a mile from the supermarket, easy walking distance for all but the handicapped.   At it's closest point, it's 123 yards from the border of that food desert to the front entrance to the supermarket, and that's almost all parking lot.  Oh, and the road is a 30 MPH city street with stoplights and crosswalks, so it's not like people have to cross a superhighway to get there.

I checked on Google Earth just to make sure my measurements were correct.

Even by the original standard of "low income and 1 to 10 miles", in the town I used to live in there is a smaller, but well-stocked grocery store within a quarter of a mile of one of those "LI and LA 1 to 10 mile" food deserts.  That means that for at least 3/4ths of a mile from the border of the food desert closest to that store, it's bullshiat.  Meaningless.  Because the metric is *WRONG*.

And that's just my local area.

So I have to conclude that the concept of the food desert, while not entirely without merit, has been expanded to include areas that aren't actually food deserts by even their own defini ...


I have no idea why this sidebar is happening, but I'd like to note the the maps are selected by census tract where a significant number of the residents are more than a mile from the nearest supermarket. It's not by house or by block, it's by census tract, okay?  It's not the metric that's wrong, it's the area boundary.
 
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