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(Press-Enterprise (So. Cal))   All you dirty hippies with your bio-cars have unleashed the scourge of grease thieves: "These thieves come in the middle of night. They make a mess. And usually it's near a storm drain"   (pe.com) divider line 77
    More: Obvious  
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5083 clicks; posted to Main » on 02 Sep 2014 at 3:13 AM (26 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-09-01 10:31:51 PM  
I have to admit a McD's by me has a great automated system. A "grease truck" pulls up, attached three hoses to an external tap, and both filters current oil and drains old oil. Really neat, no mess.
 
2014-09-01 11:21:04 PM  
I knew a couple who had one of these. We called it the french fry car--an old Mercedes wagon, of all things. It tended to get dirty because of the grease, but you couldn't argue with free gas.
 
2014-09-01 11:49:32 PM  
i.imgur.com
"That's my retirement grease!"
 
2014-09-02 03:19:51 AM  

GreenAdder: [i.imgur.com image 480x360]
"That's my retirement grease!"


Came for this leaving satisfied
 
2014-09-02 03:24:01 AM  
What it does: Increases fines from $500 to $1,000 for first offense, $1,000 to $5,000 for second offense, and from $2,000 to $10,000 for third offense. Authorizes police to impound thieves' vehicles.

What's the point of that, exactly?
 
2014-09-02 03:24:46 AM  
It works pretty good in warm climates, but in places with cold winters the grease solidifies. E85 is also a problem in places like Minnesota in winter, not that it's likely to freeze, but the vapor pressure is too low to get the engine started.
 
2014-09-02 03:29:36 AM  
When I first heard of fatbergs, I imagined that it was the loads of fat people had to be passing at some point when they lost a bunch of weight.

Derp.
 
2014-09-02 03:29:53 AM  

fusillade762: What it does: Increases fines from $500 to $1,000 for first offense, $1,000 to $5,000 for second offense, and from $2,000 to $10,000 for third offense. Authorizes police to impound thieves' vehicles.

What's the point of that, exactly?


Stop them from stealing grease? They need to haul it away in something.
 
2014-09-02 03:35:38 AM  
img.fark.net

/wanted for questioning
 
2014-09-02 03:36:41 AM  
I used to get my used fry oil from the Chinese restaurant up the street. They were happy to let me take it for free..otherwise they'd have to pay someone to come haul it off.

/'82 VW Jetta diesel and '84 Benz 300TD
//exhaust smelled of egg rolls
 
2014-09-02 03:37:42 AM  
I have two friends who each converted their Mercedes diesel car to run on used vegetable oil.  But of course:  They immediately began a life of crime, sneaking behind Chinese restaurants in the middle of the night to steal the used vegetable oil.  Fortunately, in Highland Park there are a lot of Chinese restaurants.

One told me that in a pinch, if his used oil fuel supply is getting low, he stops at Smart & Final and buys a gallon container of cooking oil.
 
2014-09-02 03:39:19 AM  

Abacus9: fusillade762: What it does: Increases fines from $500 to $1,000 for first offense, $1,000 to $5,000 for second offense, and from $2,000 to $10,000 for third offense. Authorizes police to impound thieves' vehicles.

What's the point of that, exactly?

Stop them from stealing grease? They need to haul it away in something.


That could be said of just about any thief except shoplifters. Are we going to confiscate every criminal's vehicle?
 
2014-09-02 03:40:12 AM  

Mztlplx: I used to get my used fry oil from the Chinese restaurant up the street.


Ross, is that you?
 
2014-09-02 03:44:21 AM  
My cousins had his car converted a year ago. Now he drives around with a bumper sticker that says "Your fat ass powers my car! Thanks." He gates all his used oil from a local fried chicken place. He has so much saved up his wife made him stop getting more. Apparently he has the garage filled with 55 gallon drums
 
2014-09-02 03:50:23 AM  
Biodiesel reminds me more of a certain NIXON YOU DOLTISH type ex-Farker than "hippies."
 
2014-09-02 04:07:37 AM  

fusillade762: Abacus9: fusillade762: What it does: Increases fines from $500 to $1,000 for first offense, $1,000 to $5,000 for second offense, and from $2,000 to $10,000 for third offense. Authorizes police to impound thieves' vehicles.

What's the point of that, exactly?

Stop them from stealing grease? They need to haul it away in something.

That could be said of just about any thief except shoplifters. Are we going to confiscate every criminal's vehicle?


In some cases the thieves might have trucks with tanks that can hold hundreds of gallons of oil. Probably pumps and hoses built in. If that's the case I can see it. If we're talking about a fifty gallon drum in a pickup truck, then I agree with you that it's excessive.
 
2014-09-02 04:14:44 AM  

Abacus9: It works pretty good in warm climates, but in places with cold winters the grease solidifies. E85 is also a problem in places like Minnesota in winter, not that it's likely to freeze, but the vapor pressure is too low to get the engine started.


Biodiesel or diesel, they'll have trouble starting in bitterly cold weather.
 
2014-09-02 04:22:29 AM  

fusillade762: Abacus9: fusillade762: What it does: Increases fines from $500 to $1,000 for first offense, $1,000 to $5,000 for second offense, and from $2,000 to $10,000 for third offense. Authorizes police to impound thieves' vehicles.

What's the point of that, exactly?

Stop them from stealing grease? They need to haul it away in something.

That could be said of just about any thief except shoplifters. Are we going to confiscate every criminal's vehicle?


If it's used to commit a crime, yes. They impound vehicles used when someone is arrested for DUI. How is this different?
 
2014-09-02 04:23:44 AM  

anuran: Abacus9: It works pretty good in warm climates, but in places with cold winters the grease solidifies. E85 is also a problem in places like Minnesota in winter, not that it's likely to freeze, but the vapor pressure is too low to get the engine started.

Biodiesel or diesel, they'll have trouble starting in bitterly cold weather.


Yeah, especially with the brutal winters here in Tucson.
Some winters, snow even sticks to the ground for longer than 20 minutes.
/About once in four years or so.
//25 whole minutes
 
2014-09-02 04:27:02 AM  

anuran: Abacus9: It works pretty good in warm climates, but in places with cold winters the grease solidifies. E85 is also a problem in places like Minnesota in winter, not that it's likely to freeze, but the vapor pressure is too low to get the engine started.

Biodiesel or diesel, they'll have trouble starting in bitterly cold weather.


Not really, biodiesel freezes into congealed fat in a refrigerator set at 40 degrees F, above freezing. Regular diesel is just fine in a freezer, and at one of my old jobs I had to drive trucks in the winter. Not a big problem.
 
2014-09-02 04:29:37 AM  
But the thorium car will save us!!!!

cdn2.collective-evolution.com

Once they figure out the minor detail of how to stop fast neutrons will something less that a wall of concrete. And car crash nuclear disasters. And glow in the dark self repair fanatics.
 
2014-09-02 04:30:46 AM  

demaL-demaL-yeH: anuran: Abacus9: It works pretty good in warm climates, but in places with cold winters the grease solidifies. E85 is also a problem in places like Minnesota in winter, not that it's likely to freeze, but the vapor pressure is too low to get the engine started.

Biodiesel or diesel, they'll have trouble starting in bitterly cold weather.

Yeah, especially with the brutal winters here in Tucson.
Some winters, snow even sticks to the ground for longer than 20 minutes.
/About once in four years or so.
//25 whole minutes


Last winter in Michigan, we got 18 inches of snow in one day, and much more off and on after that. Stuck to the ground about four months.
 
2014-09-02 04:39:05 AM  
Hasn't this been an issue for 15 years or so?
 
2014-09-02 04:39:24 AM  
The New Yorker had a good story about the grease business. It's kind of like the the garbage business with people fighting over territories and clients. But instead of a fee to take stuff away, they pay the restaurants. And thievery is rampant.

It's a good read and the New Yorker archives are free for (I think) another month before they implement their paywall.

Hot Grease - The Wild West of used-cooking-oil theft.By John Colapinto
 
2014-09-02 05:11:28 AM  
I run my '05 VW Polo on clean veg oil:petrodiesel, with no mods or extra filters.

To use used oil, of course it'd need filtered/cleaned somehow first. I've not looked into that at all as new oil is still significantly cheaper than petrodiesel in the UK.

Owner's manual recommends no more than 50:50 mix, I've been running a higher ratio than that, but it's summer, so the veg oil isn't at risk of solidifying.

My brother says he's run his Land Rover on 100% veg oil. Newer diesels are a lot more picky about what you feed them, though.

Abacus9: anuran: Abacus9: It works pretty good in warm climates, but in places with cold winters the grease solidifies. E85 is also a problem in places like Minnesota in winter, not that it's likely to freeze, but the vapor pressure is too low to get the engine started.

Biodiesel or diesel, they'll have trouble starting in bitterly cold weather.

Not really, biodiesel freezes into congealed fat in a refrigerator set at 40 degrees F, above freezing. Regular diesel is just fine in a freezer, and at one of my old jobs I had to drive trucks in the winter. Not a big problem.


In places with really cold winters, it's necessary to use heaters to warm up even petrodiesel in vehicles before you can start them.

It is more of an issue with biodiesel, but that's why you can get heated fuel lines, and kits with an extra tank for your oil; the engine runs on petrodiesel until the oil's warmed up, then switches to the oil.

Oh, and the flipside to that is that if you're running veg oil in hot weather, the oil may go rancid.
 
2014-09-02 05:22:26 AM  

GreenAdder: [i.imgur.com image 480x360]
"That's my retirement grease!"


Very well, I see this thread is all in order. Carry on.
 
2014-09-02 05:48:12 AM  
Holden likened the problem to the widespread practice of combing recycled-trash bins at street curbs for redeemable cans and bottles.

So he likens it to a practice where people are willing to take for free something that municipalities have to pay someone to take.

I don't see a problem with this except for the people making messes. Don't lock up your grease bins and you have to pay less often to have someone rid you of an occupational nuisance.
 
2014-09-02 05:48:43 AM  

iron de havilland: I run my '05 VW Polo on clean veg oil:petrodiesel, with no mods or extra filters.

To use used oil, of course it'd need filtered/cleaned somehow first. I've not looked into that at all as new oil is still significantly cheaper than petrodiesel in the UK.

Owner's manual recommends no more than 50:50 mix, I've been running a higher ratio than that, but it's summer, so the veg oil isn't at risk of solidifying.

My brother says he's run his Land Rover on 100% veg oil. Newer diesels are a lot more picky about what you feed them, though.

Abacus9: anuran: Abacus9: It works pretty good in warm climates, but in places with cold winters the grease solidifies. E85 is also a problem in places like Minnesota in winter, not that it's likely to freeze, but the vapor pressure is too low to get the engine started.

Biodiesel or diesel, they'll have trouble starting in bitterly cold weather.

Not really, biodiesel freezes into congealed fat in a refrigerator set at 40 degrees F, above freezing. Regular diesel is just fine in a freezer, and at one of my old jobs I had to drive trucks in the winter. Not a big problem.

In places with really cold winters, it's necessary to use heaters to warm up even petrodiesel in vehicles before you can start them.

It is more of an issue with biodiesel, but that's why you can get heated fuel lines, and kits with an extra tank for your oil; the engine runs on petrodiesel until the oil's warmed up, then switches to the oil.

Oh, and the flipside to that is that if you're running veg oil in hot weather, the oil may go rancid.


Ah, thanks! I used to test the stuff, but never ran a vehicle on biodiesel. Good to learn something new!

My idea is that it's just too inconvenient for saving a buck. Considering the money involved in heating the fuel lines, and the time it would take, and the potential danger to those who aren't careful enough. I don't see how it's a huge money saver, even if it is cheaper. No such thing as free energy. Gibb would agree.

Like with electric cars, they can only go so far before the gas kicks in (in the case of the Volt). Even so, you still have to charge them, and that energy comes from somewhere (petrochemical usually). I'm all for alternative energy, but let's do it right. Biodiesel and ethanol is largely a bad solution.
 
2014-09-02 05:51:52 AM  

Hoopy Frood: Holden likened the problem to the widespread practice of combing recycled-trash bins at street curbs for redeemable cans and bottles.

So he likens it to a practice where people are willing to take for free something that municipalities have to pay someone to take.

I don't see a problem with this except for the people making messes. Don't lock up your grease bins and you have to pay less often to have someone rid you of an occupational nuisance.


Have you worked at a restaurant? That grease doesn't get thrown out, it gets cleaned and reused. This isn't stealing trash, it really is theft.
 
2014-09-02 05:55:33 AM  

Pointy Tail of Satan: But the thorium car will save us!!!!

[cdn2.collective-evolution.com image 480x320]

Once they figure out the minor detail of how to stop fast neutrons will something less that a wall of concrete. And car crash nuclear disasters. And glow in the dark self repair fanatics.


Radiation never hurt anyone... (except all the people that its hurt.)

/It's only a model.
 
2014-09-02 05:56:25 AM  

Abacus9: iron de havilland: I run my '05 VW Polo on clean veg oil:petrodiesel, with no mods or extra filters.

To use used oil, of course it'd need filtered/cleaned somehow first. I've not looked into that at all as new oil is still significantly cheaper than petrodiesel in the UK.

Owner's manual recommends no more than 50:50 mix, I've been running a higher ratio than that, but it's summer, so the veg oil isn't at risk of solidifying.

My brother says he's run his Land Rover on 100% veg oil. Newer diesels are a lot more picky about what you feed them, though.

Abacus9: anuran: Abacus9: It works pretty good in warm climates, but in places with cold winters the grease solidifies. E85 is also a problem in places like Minnesota in winter, not that it's likely to freeze, but the vapor pressure is too low to get the engine started.

Biodiesel or diesel, they'll have trouble starting in bitterly cold weather.

Not really, biodiesel freezes into congealed fat in a refrigerator set at 40 degrees F, above freezing. Regular diesel is just fine in a freezer, and at one of my old jobs I had to drive trucks in the winter. Not a big problem.

In places with really cold winters, it's necessary to use heaters to warm up even petrodiesel in vehicles before you can start them.

It is more of an issue with biodiesel, but that's why you can get heated fuel lines, and kits with an extra tank for your oil; the engine runs on petrodiesel until the oil's warmed up, then switches to the oil.

Oh, and the flipside to that is that if you're running veg oil in hot weather, the oil may go rancid.

Ah, thanks! I used to test the stuff, but never ran a vehicle on biodiesel. Good to learn something new!

My idea is that it's just too inconvenient for saving a buck. Considering the money involved in heating the fuel lines, and the time it would take, and the potential danger to those who aren't careful enough. I don't see how it's a huge money saver, even if it is cheaper. No such thing as free energy. Gibb would agree.

Like with electric cars, they can only go so far before the gas kicks in (in the case of the Volt). Even so, you still have to charge them, and that energy comes from somewhere (petrochemical usually). I'm all for alternative energy, but let's do it right. Biodiesel and ethanol is largely a bad solution.


Cost benefit makes it worth it in the UK. Diesel's $2+ per litre here.
 
2014-09-02 05:58:10 AM  

Abacus9: Hoopy Frood: Holden likened the problem to the widespread practice of combing recycled-trash bins at street curbs for redeemable cans and bottles.

So he likens it to a practice where people are willing to take for free something that municipalities have to pay someone to take.

I don't see a problem with this except for the people making messes. Don't lock up your grease bins and you have to pay less often to have someone rid you of an occupational nuisance.

Have you worked at a restaurant? That grease doesn't get thrown out, it gets cleaned and reused. This isn't stealing trash, it really is theft.


Uh, not quite.  The stuff in the bins out back sure as hell ain't going back in the fryer.  At least I sincerely hope not.  Have you seen the inside of those bins?
 
2014-09-02 06:15:11 AM  

Abacus9: fusillade762: Abacus9: fusillade762: What it does: Increases fines from $500 to $1,000 for first offense, $1,000 to $5,000 for second offense, and from $2,000 to $10,000 for third offense. Authorizes police to impound thieves' vehicles.

What's the point of that, exactly?

Stop them from stealing grease? They need to haul it away in something.

That could be said of just about any thief except shoplifters. Are we going to confiscate every criminal's vehicle?

If it's used to commit a crime, yes. They impound vehicles used when someone is arrested for DUI. How is this different?


A DUI requires a vehicle by definition. This just sounds like more asset forfeiture bullshiat.
 
2014-09-02 06:32:47 AM  

reubendaley: [img.fark.net image 120x156]

/wanted for questioning


Hobble?
 
2014-09-02 06:39:33 AM  
I worked for a beer distributor that collected grease from restaurants & filtered, etc. the grease when we got it back at the warehouse. We had the same issues with thieves also. The guy they hired that first started doing it went to work for a place in Florida that collects grease & ships it some island/islands? in the Caribbean. So yeah, it's big business.
 
2014-09-02 06:46:18 AM  

whidbey: Biodiesel reminds me more of a certain NIXON YOU DOLTISH type ex-Farker than "hippies."


We only WISH he was an ex-Farker.
 
2014-09-02 06:52:45 AM  
I love how the article says that this is costing those places "millions in lost revenue", when in the past just trying to get rid of it cost them "millions in lost revenue"... As soon as they realized there were people who actually wanted that crap, then they started charging the saps for the privilege of taking their trash...

And of course with it affecting big business and not the average peon, the bill flies through the process...
 
2014-09-02 07:41:49 AM  

Arcturus72: I love how the article says that this is costing those places "millions in lost revenue", when in the past just trying to get rid of it cost them "millions in lost revenue"... As soon as they realized there were people who actually wanted that crap, then they started charging the saps for the privilege of taking their trash...

And of course with it affecting big business and not the average peon, the bill flies through the process...


When nobody was offering to buy the grease it was an expense because they had to pay to get rid of it. The second they started getting paid for it that expense became income which they lose when somebody starts stealing the grease.

A lot of places don't even own their grease bins they are provided by the recycler so if you are putting out the money to provide a bin it would be a real kick in the bag to show up with a truck to empty it and fine that some yahoo beat you to it.
 
2014-09-02 07:47:32 AM  

Abacus9: Hoopy Frood: Holden likened the problem to the widespread practice of combing recycled-trash bins at street curbs for redeemable cans and bottles.

So he likens it to a practice where people are willing to take for free something that municipalities have to pay someone to take.

I don't see a problem with this except for the people making messes. Don't lock up your grease bins and you have to pay less often to have someone rid you of an occupational nuisance.

Have you worked at a restaurant? That grease doesn't get thrown out, it gets cleaned and reused. This isn't stealing trash, it really is theft.


Yes, I have. It gets thrown out at the end of the day. If not, report that place to your health board.
 
2014-09-02 08:02:39 AM  

anuran: Abacus9: It works pretty good in warm climates, but in places with cold winters the grease solidifies. E85 is also a problem in places like Minnesota in winter, not that it's likely to freeze, but the vapor pressure is too low to get the engine started.

Biodiesel or diesel, they'll have trouble starting in bitterly cold weather.


Glow plugs will fix that problem.
 
2014-09-02 08:04:51 AM  

Rezurok: Abacus9: Hoopy Frood: Holden likened the problem to the widespread practice of combing recycled-trash bins at street curbs for redeemable cans and bottles.

So he likens it to a practice where people are willing to take for free something that municipalities have to pay someone to take.

I don't see a problem with this except for the people making messes. Don't lock up your grease bins and you have to pay less often to have someone rid you of an occupational nuisance.

Have you worked at a restaurant? That grease doesn't get thrown out, it gets cleaned and reused. This isn't stealing trash, it really is theft.

Uh, not quite.  The stuff in the bins out back sure as hell ain't going back in the fryer.  At least I sincerely hope not.  Have you seen the inside of those bins?


The inside of those things brings back horrible memories. One place I used to work had an underground grease pit, someone managed to get a bagel crammed in the pipe somehow, which of course swelled due to the grease. We had to send a man down to the grease pit. It was horrific.
 
2014-09-02 08:06:44 AM  

Abacus9: anuran: Abacus9: It works pretty good in warm climates, but in places with cold winters the grease solidifies. E85 is also a problem in places like Minnesota in winter, not that it's likely to freeze, but the vapor pressure is too low to get the engine started.

Biodiesel or diesel, they'll have trouble starting in bitterly cold weather.

Not really, biodiesel freezes into congealed fat in a refrigerator set at 40 degrees F, above freezing. Regular diesel is just fine in a freezer, and at one of my old jobs I had to drive trucks in the winter. Not a big problem.


Last year in Minnesota, we had something like 40 days where the temperature didn't get above 0 degrees. It was a big problem.
 
2014-09-02 08:38:40 AM  

Abacus9: anuran: Abacus9: It works pretty good in warm climates, but in places with cold winters the grease solidifies. E85 is also a problem in places like Minnesota in winter, not that it's likely to freeze, but the vapor pressure is too low to get the engine started.

Biodiesel or diesel, they'll have trouble starting in bitterly cold weather.

Not really, biodiesel freezes into congealed fat in a refrigerator set at 40 degrees F, above freezing. Regular diesel is just fine in a freezer, and at one of my old jobs I had to drive trucks in the winter. Not a big problem.


Uh, guys... Biodiesel and waste vegetable oil are 2 different things. Biodiesel typically starts as virgin vegetable oil, but it has the glycerine and some other things removed. It's chemically pretty similar to petroleum- based diesel, and gels at a similar temperature. Even the actual vegetable oil, in most cases, doesn't gel until you get below freezing (Olive oil will, as well as palm oil, but corn oil, canola oil, and sunflower oil don't) Also, most biodiesel uses non- food grade rapeseed oil (the food grade rapeseed oil is called canola oil) so it doesn't reduce the food supply, unlike ethanol.
 
2014-09-02 08:48:03 AM  

cryinoutloud: I knew a couple who had one of these. We called it the french fry car--an old Mercedes wagon, of all things. It tended to get dirty because of the grease, but you couldn't argue with free gas.


Late 70s- early 80s Mercedes 300Ds are probably the most popular car to convert to WVO. Those engines were basically made to be able to burn anything, they're pretty cheap (or were, until all the hippies started snapping them up) They're basically indestructible, and they're really the only late 70s- early 80s diesel passenger car that has enough power to get out of its own way. They're simple as hell- there is literally one electrical wire attached to the engine, and it's for the oil pressure warning light, the fuel system is entirely mechanical and uses a vacuum- operated solenoid to shut the engine off (which gets interesting when you're unfamiliar with them, and you get a leak in the vacuum system- turn the key off... engine keeps running. Disconnect the battery, engine keeps running. Disable the alternator... engine keeps running. This is why there is a big, red, metal lever under the hood that says "STOP" on it- if the engine doesn't stop when you turn off the key, you open the hood and hold that lever down until it shuts off. Then you locate the little rubber hose under the dashboard that has a hole in it, and replace it.

Anyhow... Yes. Old mercedes diesels are VERY common WVO cars. Old VW Rabbits are common as well- just as reliable, just as simple, but even in tip- top shape, running the fuel intended for it, they only produced 50 HP. With 400,000 miles on them, you're probably down to about 30 or 40.
 
2014-09-02 08:54:30 AM  

reubendaley: [img.fark.net image 120x156]

/wanted for questioning


I've been a fan of his since he was at DC101.
 
2014-09-02 08:58:14 AM  
The fuel is "free" if your time has no value.   For the time and capital you spend getting "free" fuel, you could just buy a better car or buy biodiesel.

/has a VW TDI
//gets 50 mpg
///spends 5 minutes every 3 weeks to fill it up
 
hej
2014-09-02 09:02:09 AM  
How do you get to be upset about people stealing something you are throwing away?
 
2014-09-02 09:15:58 AM  

Abacus9: It works pretty good in warm climates, but in places with cold winters the grease solidifies. E85 is also a problem in places like Minnesota in winter, not that it's likely to freeze, but the vapor pressure is too low to get the engine started.


That's why grease powered vehicles ("Greaseles") typically have a one-gallon auxiliary tank filled with diesel that's used to start the engine in cold weather.  Once started, a tank heater warms the grease tank to liquify it.  The system is designed to switch from the diesel to grease once it's warmed.
 
2014-09-02 09:36:28 AM  

MemeSlave: The fuel is "free" if your time has no value.   For the time and capital you spend getting "free" fuel, you could just buy a better car or buy biodiesel.

/has a VW TDI
//gets 50 mpg
///spends 5 minutes every 3 weeks to fill it up


After the initial weekend spent setting up the filtration system and storage tank in my garage, I spend perhaps four hours a month collecting and transferring oil and maintaining the system. I've spent perhaps $500 on the initial conversion for the car, and the system in the garage (did the work myself, but I'm a mechanical engineer so it was more fun than work, YMMV). That was five years ago. It paid for itself a long time ago.

/84 Benz 300TD, >300,000 miles
//your TDI would fit in the trunk next to the WVO tank
///still gets 30mpg in town as a 4500lb car
////if a car that hits me is smaller than a cement mixer, I win...if it's bigger, I might notice someone hit me.
//slashies!
 
2014-09-02 10:02:44 AM  

hej: How do you get to be upset about people stealing something you are throwing away?


Check out my earlier comment...
 
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