If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Forbes)   Why a 40-hour work week in the US actually works out to be 47 hours   (forbes.com) divider line 134
    More: Interesting, United States, work days  
•       •       •

5478 clicks; posted to Business » on 01 Sep 2014 at 11:43 AM (7 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



134 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all
 
2014-09-01 09:38:35 AM  
That's why I love consulting.  Same hourly rate as employees, but either work 10% less or earn 10% more.
 
2014-09-01 10:47:45 AM  
I don't think 47 hours is a grueling long work week.
 
2014-09-01 10:49:18 AM  
Because Americans are generally overworked undercompensated suckers (aka 'freedom').

Good luck with that.
 
2014-09-01 10:49:23 AM  
For the same reason Americans don't take all their vacation time. They're stupid.

/American
//Probably stupid
 
2014-09-01 11:03:58 AM  

Doktor_Zhivago: I don't think 47 hours is a grueling long work week.


If those extra hours are not compensated then the employer is effectively stealing almost an entire extra day a week.
 
2014-09-01 11:05:08 AM  
If I had a job doing something I liked, I'd be glad to work 40-50 hours a week at it. It's tough being a full time bum.
 
2014-09-01 11:18:29 AM  

Riche: If those extra hours are not compensated then the employer is effectively stealing almost an entire extra day a week.


my understanding from the article was they were compensated except for exempt employees in which case I have never heard of an overtime exempt employee expecting to or working less than 40 hrs a week.
 
2014-09-01 11:26:56 AM  

Doktor_Zhivago: Riche: If those extra hours are not compensated then the employer is effectively stealing almost an entire extra day a week.

my understanding from the article was they were compensated except for exempt employees in which case I have never heard of an overtime exempt employee expecting to or working less than 40 hrs a week.


*raises hand*

I was under orders not to never go over. Of course it was a union gig.
 
2014-09-01 11:34:19 AM  
At my last job, I "worked" about 35 hours a week with about 10 hours of commuting. In those 35 hours, I spent anywhere from 30 at the most to four or five at the least actually working.

That job was hell.

My current job, I work about 45-55 hours a week with about 4 hours of commute time weekly, probably a little more if you count responding to emails on weekends and taking phone calls at home.

I rarely any down time at work, maybe one or two hours total (including person email, fark, screwing around) per week when I'm really busy, and maybe one or two hours a day when it's slow.

I like my current job a lot more than my former job.
 
2014-09-01 11:42:39 AM  
I work 45 hours a week by default because I hardly ever take an actual lunch break. I eat at my desk and keep working. I usually leave at 4pm and do another hour or two from home. Yep. I'm salaried.
 
2014-09-01 11:53:21 AM  
becuause some managers have no clue that workers can be more productive if they hire more people, instead of giving them 5-10 hours of overtime
 
2014-09-01 12:01:34 PM  

kkinnison: becuause some managers have no clue that workers can be more productive if they hire more people, instead of giving them 5-10 hours of overtime




Hiring more people costs money.
 
2014-09-01 12:03:45 PM  

what_now: I rarely any down time at work, maybe one or two hours total (including person email, fark, screwing around) per week when I'm really busy, and maybe one or two hours a day when it's slow.

I like my current job a lot more than my former job.


No downtime means the day goes by a lot faster.
 
2014-09-01 12:05:35 PM  
I usually did 45-50 a week , no OT
But the job was fun (at least to me)
And paid very well
 
2014-09-01 12:05:44 PM  
I love working in a place that abhors the time card mentality
 
2014-09-01 12:21:00 PM  

cmunic8r99: I love working in a place that abhors the time card mentality




This!

I usually roll in to work around 9:30, and I typically leave anytime from 545-630. Occasionally, I leave earlier, occasionally I stay later. No one checks or cares.

It's incredibly freeing to come and go as you please because you are treated as an adult who will get her work done in a timely fashion.
 
2014-09-01 12:22:08 PM  
Several factors are contributing to these gruellingly long work weeks, one of which is pay structure, according to Gallup. While hourly workers can face limits by employers trying to cut costs, those on a salary often work up to five hours a week more. Some people have also taken on a second job, contributing to time spent in the office.

There's 2 factors. Where's the rest of the "several"? Where's the rest of the article? That was an interesting start to what was going to be an interesting article and then it just stopped.
 
GBB
2014-09-01 12:30:32 PM  
Because it's cheaper to pay 1 person an extra 7 hours of OT instead of paying for a second person 40 hours.
 
2014-09-01 12:36:18 PM  
Salary is slavery
 
2014-09-01 12:39:15 PM  
I love dragging the curve down.
 
2014-09-01 12:44:14 PM  

GBB: Because it's cheaper to pay 1 person an extra 7 hours of OT instead of paying for a second person 40 hours.


If it's only one guy, sure. But in the real world, it's everybody who works at the place, and it is probably only a tiny bit more expensive to actually have the extra guy on staff, and it means that if someone takes a vacation or gets sick, you have coverage.
 
2014-09-01 12:46:48 PM  
Article sounds like BS to me.

Approx 40% of American workers are salaried
Which leaves 60% as hourly.
There are basically zero hourly employees getting paid for more than 40 hours a week on a regular basis with most not even working a full 40 hours.

Even if you assume the avg hourly employee works exactly 40hrs a week (which they dont), that means the %40 of employees who are salaried would have to be working an average of 56 hours a week.
 
2014-09-01 12:50:33 PM  
And most adults factor that into to their asking price when they take the job.
 
2014-09-01 12:58:15 PM  

cmunic8r99: I love working in a place that abhors the time card mentality


Yup... No big deal if I arrive 15-30 minutes late, because I usually stay that much later. All they care about is that my work gets done at a reasonable time. Of course, that sort of attitude about time doesn't work for the people in the office who take care of the customers, but even those folks have some amount of flexibility. It's nice working for a company owned by 2 actual people, who you actually see each day, as opposed to a faceless corporation.
 
2014-09-01 12:59:19 PM  

420Gabriel: Article sounds like BS to me.

Approx 40% of American workers are salaried
Which leaves 60% as hourly.
There are basically zero hourly employees getting paid for more than 40 hours a week on a regular basis with most not even working a full 40 hours.

Even if you assume the avg hourly employee works exactly 40hrs a week (which they dont), that means the %40 of employees who are salaried would have to be working an average of 56 hours a week.


I had one job that was pretty nice in some ways. I drove the car rental shuttle bus at an airport and the last flight of the night was often delayed. I almost always left work at least an hour late. Sometimes it sucked to find out that the 10:50pm flight was delayed until 1:30am, but at least I was getting paid OT to do nothing but wait. Sometimes there were a few customers on the flight, sometimes there weren't until they figured out that their rental company had decided to call it a night. I loved telling people,"Sorry, your rental company went home for the night. However, we're open and will gladly help you out."
 
2014-09-01 01:04:07 PM  

Greek: cmunic8r99: I love working in a place that abhors the time card mentality

Yup... No big deal if I arrive 15-30 minutes late, because I usually stay that much later. All they care about is that my work gets done at a reasonable time. Of course, that sort of attitude about time doesn't work for the people in the office who take care of the customers, but even those folks have some amount of flexibility. It's nice working for a company owned by 2 actual people, who you actually see each day, as opposed to a faceless corporation.


The faceless corporation I work for isn't all bad when it comes to stuff like this.
 
2014-09-01 01:17:18 PM  
I'm kind of odd in that I actually prefer an hourly payment rate over salary.  While you occasionally run into time-card micro-management BS, it's worth it to not look at your check and work out that you've actually made less than minimum wage in any given period.
 
2014-09-01 01:24:32 PM  
For me it's about the situation.  I'm OK pulling an all-nighter if something blows up.  That's rare -- or rather, should be rare.  What makes me stabby is when I have to work late because someone else screwed up.

Working the occasional long shift is part of being a professional.  If you're constantly working long hours because they're "short-handed" and stuff's constantly blowing up, though, that's mismanagement.
 
2014-09-01 01:30:36 PM  

gadian: I'm kind of odd in that I actually prefer an hourly payment rate over salary.  While you occasionally run into time-card micro-management BS, it's worth it to not look at your check and work out that you've actually made less than minimum wage in any given period.


my brother in law is a store manager for national drug store. - he's salaried and while it's a nice amount when he's actually only working 40-45 hours a week - sometimes when the shiat hits the fan - ie: too many employees call out/quit/get fired/whatever he sometimes ends up working 70+ hours a week. at that point he's barely making what some of the part time employees do per hour. I mean, yeah - he's still making good money but putting that much time into work is just dreadful as he's got a wife and kids and wont even get to see them unless they stop by the store.

on the other hand - i'm a dept manager for another national retail company and get paid hourly. does it vary week to week? sure. sometimes I only work 38 hours. others weeks it's more like 55 hours. anything over 40 is time and a half and the company doesn't really make a big deal out of it as long as it's justified.

my brother in law actually makes a bit more than me, but not by much. whereas he feels like he's getting screwed by working insane hours and being on salary - I don't feel that way at all when I have to work extra hours.
 
2014-09-01 01:34:33 PM  
So some of you are perfectly happy to donate your time to your employer? This is why we can't have nice things.
 
2014-09-01 01:35:50 PM  
Currently, my work week is anywhere between 65 and 80 hours, not counting the commute, which can be 6-10 hours. But, I guess, on average it's weighed down by those weeks when I work zero hours.
 
2014-09-01 01:58:48 PM  

ghare: GBB: Because it's cheaper to pay 1 person an extra 7 hours of OT instead of paying for a second person 40 hours.

If it's only one guy, sure. But in the real world, it's everybody who works at the place, and it is probably only a tiny bit more expensive to actually have the extra guy on staff, and it means that if someone takes a vacation or gets sick, you have coverage.


In the real world, the extra guy can only cover 20% of the team's OT, so a few more extras are hired to take care of the rest.  Also in the real world, half of those people didn't like losing that OT so they slow down their work a bit in order to get some of it back.
 
2014-09-01 02:09:56 PM  
My time in salaried mgmt wasn't bad.  Went to work at noon and usually left before 10PM.  I did some serious goofing off for 2 hours in the middle of the day.  My boss even asked me why I didn't go home earlier at night.  I stuck around because it helped employee morale.  Their past couple of managers would leave before the PM operation was finished and that bothered them.  It was worth it to stick around and "be there" until the end of the shift, even if I was just walking around and talking to them.  If you count actual work, maybe, just MAYBE, 40 hours a week.

I stepped back down into hourly work after that.  Two coworkers are OT hogs, but kind of dumb about it.  They opt for the longer shifts with hard work, leaving me with a short shift.  Something always comes up, however, and I end up with the odd tasks/loose ends to tie up that are GRAVY.  If they knew that I was getting as much OT as they are and only working half as hard, they'd flip.
 
2014-09-01 02:58:55 PM  

Tobin_Lam: Several factors are contributing to these gruellingly long work weeks, one of which is pay structure, according to Gallup. While hourly workers can face limits by employers trying to cut costs, those on a salary often work up to five hours a week more. Some people have also taken on a second job, contributing to time spent in the office.

There's 2 factors. Where's the rest of the "several"? Where's the rest of the article? That was an interesting start to what was going to be an interesting article and then it just stopped.


Guess the author had reached his 40 hour limit for the week.
 
2014-09-01 03:01:44 PM  
I work between 50-55 hours most weeks as an ultrasound tech at a hospital.

The thing is... I get paid hourly and everything after 40 hours a week is typically getting paid travel time to come in, time and a half for being there (with a 2 hour minimum), shift differential, and pay to be on call.  Between all this I average out making ~2.5 or 3 times as much an hour after 40 hours.

I make roughly twice as much working 55 hours/week as I would working 40 hours/week.  That makes it really really hard to pass up those last couple hours of work every week, especially since my employer is desperate for people to work the extra hours.
 
2014-09-01 03:05:31 PM  

ginandbacon: For the same reason Americans don't take all their vacation time. They're stupid.

/American
//Probably stupid


Actually, where I work, I recently overheard a conversation between two managers where they were considering firing someone who had taken most of his vacation time for the year. He had managed it down to where he had a couple of hours left over and the managers felt he was abusing the policy. I was privy to this conversation as an HR admin and I pointed out that it seemed he had carefully managed his time where he didn't go over the policy and was using what he was allotted. But they seemed to feel that him taking most of his vacation time was abusing the system. Fortunately the HR director pointed out to them that weren't entitled to fire him for actually sticking to HR policy.

And then there's this genius: http://www.askamanager.org/2011/09/how-to-deal-with-an-employee-who-t a kes-too-much-sick-leave.html .

Admittedly he says that he's a new manager, but he sincerely cannot figure out why a female employee, single with no kids, is using a sick day, once a month, every three to four weeks. Though the employees are allotted 12 days a year, he feels she's taking too much sick time even though it's time she's entitled too per their policy.

The replies in the thread range from the truly stupid to the finally enlightening.

So yeah, Americans may be stupid, but we are under a lot of pressure here from companies to never be off work under any circumstances, even real ones. Honestly we live in a country where the right to use the bathroom when you need to while working is still up for debate and not a guaranteed right.

Barbara Ehrenreich:
If low-wage workers do not always behave in an economically rational way, that is, as free agents within a capitalist democracy, it is because they dwell in a place that is neither free nor in any way democratic. When you enter the low-wage workplace - and many of the medium-wage workplaces as well - you check your civil liberties at the door, leave America and all it supposedly stands for behind, and learn to zip your lips for the duration of the shift. The consequences of this routine surrender go beyond the issues of wages and poverty. We can hardly pride ourselves on being the world's preeminent democracy, after all, if large numbers of citizens spend half their waking hours in what amounts, in plain terms, to a dictatorship.
 
2014-09-01 03:12:38 PM  
Hmmm. I work one job from 7-2 then 4-8 at another job 5 days a week. Both jobs have no benefits and no lunch breaks.  I live in a right to work like a slave state.
 
2014-09-01 03:13:48 PM  

what_now: cmunic8r99: I love working in a place that abhors the time card mentality

This!

I usually roll in to work around 9:30, and I typically leave anytime from 545-630. Occasionally, I leave earlier, occasionally I stay later. No one checks or cares.

It's incredibly freeing to come and go as you please because you are treated as an adult who will get her work done in a timely fashion.



I had a boss one that woudl sit in the lobby to see what time people came in. If you started at 9, that meant at your desk and working at 9. so if you needed to shiat or pour a coffee, you better get in at 8:45.

Yes, this was salaried workers, all with BAs and MAs (ie, adults). No, you were never thanked when you stayed passed closing (which was 75% of the time).

The excuse always was "what if a call came in for you and you werent in to take it?" and "what if a client walks in and sees empty desks?"
 
2014-09-01 03:16:01 PM  
Fun in my area is a large military presence that affects salary.  How?  Spouses and retirees take jobs (or active duty takes second jobs), accepting less wage then the job should be worth.  This drives wages down.  Retirees are ESPECIALLY guilty of this as many of them take a job JUST TO HAVE SOMETHING TO DO.

I have seen ads posted advertising positions that require ACTIVE SECRET CLEARANCE, SECURITY+ and another certification offering whopping wages of $11/hour.

So the money paid is less for everyone.  Salaried employees get Mr. Fun stick with no grease and hourly employers are ridden like pack mules wherever possible.
 
2014-09-01 03:40:27 PM  

Hermione_Granger: ginandbacon: For the same reason Americans don't take all their vacation time. They're stupid.

/American
//Probably stupid

Actually, where I work, I recently overheard a conversation between two managers where they were considering firing someone who had taken most of his vacation time for the year. He had managed it down to where he had a couple of hours left over and the managers felt he was abusing the policy. I was privy to this conversation as an HR admin and I pointed out that it seemed he had carefully managed his time where he didn't go over the policy and was using what he was allotted. But they seemed to feel that him taking most of his vacation time was abusing the system. Fortunately the HR director pointed out to them that weren't entitled to fire him for actually sticking to HR policy.

And then there's this genius: http://www.askamanager.org/2011/09/how-to-deal-with-an-employee-who-t a kes-too-much-sick-leave.html .

Admittedly he says that he's a new manager, but he sincerely cannot figure out why a female employee, single with no kids, is using a sick day, once a month, every three to four weeks. Though the employees are allotted 12 days a year, he feels she's taking too much sick time even though it's time she's entitled too per their policy.

The replies in the thread range from the truly stupid to the finally enlightening.

So yeah, Americans may be stupid, but we are under a lot of pressure here from companies to never be off work under any circumstances, even real ones. Honestly we live in a country where the right to use the bathroom when you need to while working is still up for debate and not a guaranteed right.

Barbara Ehrenreich:
If low-wage workers do not always behave in an economically rational way, that is, as free agents within a capitalist democracy, it is because they dwell in a place that is neither free nor in any way democratic. When you enter the low-wage workplace - and many of the medium-wage workplaces as well - you check ...


I can't even. How can you abuse paid time off? IT'S PART OF THE CONTRACT.

But here's the thing--this is definitely an American problem. Workers in most other developed nations don't put up with the expectation that they will either work for free or that they will give up part of their compensation. Well except Japan, but they're even crazier then we are. Per TFA, Americans routinely work an extra day every week as a volunteer. That's almost two-and-a-half weeks every year. That's nuts. And we give up more than a week in vacation days. So we are effectively donating nearly one month of work each year to our employers. That's insane.

We need more unions.
 
2014-09-01 03:47:39 PM  

ginandbacon: We need more unions.


If the Unions could be trusted not to turn into a worker-subsidized crony buddy system that would be great. But that's what it became. If you were in a Union you had not one, but multiple bosses to report to who had mutually exclusive agendas.

What we really need is to start treating people in power like diapers and change them out more frequently.
 
2014-09-01 03:56:09 PM  

Hermione_Granger: And then there's this genius: http://www.askamanager.org/2011/09/how-to-deal-with-an-employee-who-t a kes-too-much-sick-leave.html .

Admittedly he says that he's a new manager, but he sincerely cannot figure out why a female employee, single with no kids, is using a sick day, once a month, every three to four weeks. Though the employees are allotted 12 days a year, he feels she's taking too much sick time even though it's time she's entitled too per their policy.


Is the employee sick?  Yes:  no problem.  No:  abusing the benefit.

If you are taking 12 sick days a year, every year, you're either dealing with some real health issues or you're full of crap.  The easy solution is to amend policy to require a doctor's note after a certain number of sick calls.
 
2014-09-01 03:59:25 PM  

Hermione_Granger: And then there's this genius: http://www.askamanager.org/2011/09/how-to-deal-with-an-employee-who-t a kes-too-much-sick-leave.html .

Admittedly he says that he's a new manager, but he sincerely cannot figure out why a female employee, single with no kids, is using a sick day, once a month, every three to four weeks. Though the employees are allotted 12 days a year, he feels she's taking too much sick time even though it's time she's entitled too per their policy.

The replies in the thread range from the truly stupid to the finally enlightening.


Oh that thread just made me angry.  You offer 12 sick days, be prepared and don't biatch when people take 12 sick days whether they take them once a month or in three or 4 day chunks.  You offered it.  Same thing with vacation.  I'm sure as hell using every sick day and every vacation day because it is part of my compensation.
 
2014-09-01 04:06:02 PM  

Lance Russell's Nose: Hermione_Granger: And then there's this genius: http://www.askamanager.org/2011/09/how-to-deal-with-an-employee-who-t a kes-too-much-sick-leave.html .

Admittedly he says that he's a new manager, but he sincerely cannot figure out why a female employee, single with no kids, is using a sick day, once a month, every three to four weeks. Though the employees are allotted 12 days a year, he feels she's taking too much sick time even though it's time she's entitled too per their policy.

Is the employee sick?  Yes:  no problem.  No:  abusing the benefit.

If you are taking 12 sick days a year, every year, you're either dealing with some real health issues or you're full of crap.  The easy solution is to amend policy to require a doctor's note after a certain number of sick calls.




Rebuttal:

If you are getting sick, stay the fark at home. I don't want your disease ridden carcass to drag itself into the office where you will cough on the Kurig machine, whine about how sick you are, leave early and generally get very little done.

Work from home, in your jammies, if you are healthy enough, and if you aren't, take a sick day and sit on the couch.
 
2014-09-01 04:11:21 PM  

gadian: Hermione_Granger: And then there's this genius: http://www.askamanager.org/2011/09/how-to-deal-with-an-employee-who-t a kes-too-much-sick-leave.html .

Admittedly he says that he's a new manager, but he sincerely cannot figure out why a female employee, single with no kids, is using a sick day, once a month, every three to four weeks. Though the employees are allotted 12 days a year, he feels she's taking too much sick time even though it's time she's entitled too per their policy.

The replies in the thread range from the truly stupid to the finally enlightening.

Oh that thread just made me angry.  You offer 12 sick days, be prepared and don't biatch when people take 12 sick days whether they take them once a month or in three or 4 day chunks.  You offered it.  Same thing with vacation.  I'm sure as hell using every sick day and every vacation day because it is part of my compensation.


what I find hilarious is that some companies offer their employees to have their unused sick and vacation days to be rolled over into the next year(s) while others do not.

the ones that don't roll over days (use it or lose it) actually get upset when people use all their days up before the year is out (and also throw a hissy fit if you take a day off around a major holiday).

my previous employer didn't roll over days - something that never made sense to me. my current employer does and you better believe that people don't use up all their days. I work with some people that have nearly 3 months of paid time off saved up - and you accumulate more each year that you work there - so some have been there awhile will take anywhere from 2-4 weeks off (usually not all at once)  and still have time left to roll over into the next year. something that i've seen come quite in handy for people who had to take extended time off for emergencies. suffice to say, morale is much higher at this employer than my previous "use it or lose it" employer.

/previous and current employer are in the same industry so the differences in morale and corporate culture are quite noticeable.
 
2014-09-01 04:30:38 PM  

unyon: Because Americans are generally overworked undercompensated suckers (aka 'freedom').

Good luck with that.


You sound fat and laden with penis envy
 
2014-09-01 04:43:21 PM  
Is this where I complain about working 47 hours but 20 of them are on fark or gabbing with coworkers?
 
2014-09-01 04:58:07 PM  

what_now: cmunic8r99: I love working in a place that abhors the time card mentality

This!

I usually roll in to work around 9:30, and I typically leave anytime from 545-630. Occasionally, I leave earlier, occasionally I stay later. No one checks or cares.

It's incredibly freeing to come and go as you please because you are treated as an adult who will get her work done in a timely fashion.


Even better: strolling in at will in shorts and flip flops.
 
2014-09-01 05:06:56 PM  

Lumber Jack Off: gadian: I'm kind of odd in that I actually prefer an hourly payment rate over salary.  While you occasionally run into time-card micro-management BS, it's worth it to not look at your check and work out that you've actually made less than minimum wage in any given period.

my brother in law is a store manager for national drug store. - he's salaried and while it's a nice amount when he's actually only working 40-45 hours a week - sometimes when the shiat hits the fan - ie: too many employees call out/quit/get fired/whatever he sometimes ends up working 70+ hours a week. at that point he's barely making what some of the part time employees do per hour. I mean, yeah - he's still making good money but putting that much time into work is just dreadful as he's got a wife and kids and wont even get to see them unless they stop by the store.

on the other hand - i'm a dept manager for another national retail company and get paid hourly. does it vary week to week? sure. sometimes I only work 38 hours. others weeks it's more like 55 hours. anything over 40 is time and a half and the company doesn't really make a big deal out of it as long as it's justified.

my brother in law actually makes a bit more than me, but not by much. whereas he feels like he's getting screwed by working insane hours and being on salary - I don't feel that way at all when I have to work extra hours.


As a salaried manager for a national drug store, I can say with certainty: you? I like you. I can 100% empathize with your brother in law.
 
2014-09-01 05:31:58 PM  
What amazes me is that people don't figure in commuting time. As far as I'm concerned, my work day begins when I leave the house (or wherever I am) to go to work. In my case that entails a three-minute walk to the bus stop and a 10-minute bus ride. I work 4 7.5-hour shifts a week (sometimes we finish half an hour early) in a very laid-back, pressure-free environment. The "commute" brings me up from 30 hours a week to 30.75 hours a week. I'm OK with that.

However, when I hear about people who spend an hour or more on each end, I really have to wonder. Let's say your hours are officially defined as 9-5. Guess what - the commute just made them 8-6. Are you being compensated for those extra two hours? If you're driving, it's not like you're getting a lot else done in that time. Is your company compensating you for gas/wear and tear on the car? Do you have a company vehicle?

Quality of life has got to be a factor, and I'm saying this as someone who spent a good chunk of the past two years unemployed.
 
Displayed 50 of 134 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report