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(Richmond Times-Dispatch)   Archaeological dig at US college finds remains of a colonial-era brewery on campus   (timesdispatch.com) divider line 42
    More: Obvious  
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4902 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Sep 2014 at 8:59 PM (37 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



42 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-09-01 07:57:51 PM  
Robot House!
 
2014-09-01 09:04:43 PM  
...which was immediately shut down and seized by campus police.
 
2014-09-01 09:11:31 PM  
...the college had slaves who sold the school hops...

You're doing it wrong.
 
2014-09-01 09:11:45 PM  
....since taxes could not be collected from the dead, the living relatives were tracked down and served with legal papers and the tax bill.
 
2014-09-01 09:16:54 PM  
Small beer?  What the hell kind of college was this?  And what size where their bongs?

/Pretty old school, when they had toga parties they just borrowed mom and dad's clothes.
 
2014-09-01 09:20:33 PM  
Sam Adams?
 
2014-09-01 09:21:35 PM  

ultraholland: Robot House!


Mars University.
 
2014-09-01 09:24:06 PM  
And someone in the very near future will find William Tecumseh Sherman's "tobacco" pipe at LSU.
 
2014-09-01 09:24:50 PM  
Tfa: Small beer just means it were second or third brew and less alcoholic, like an ale today," he said.

I know some ales that get up to 12 - 15%
 
2014-09-01 09:27:46 PM  

jaytkay: ...the college had slaves who sold the school hops...

You're doing it wrong.


Stupid East Coast ivory tower liberal elites, can't even do slavery right.
 
2014-09-01 09:40:14 PM  
Pre-WWI beers were immensely stronger than beer postwar, so I expect their small beer still ran 4-5% ABV. So about what a Surly Furious would be. Not bad.
 
2014-09-01 09:45:47 PM  

fusillade762: jaytkay: ...the college had slaves who sold the school hops...

You're doing it wrong.

Stupid East Coast ivory tower liberal elites, can't even do slavery right.


If yo slaves had hops, they be dunkin' on yo pumkin'.
 
2014-09-01 09:48:23 PM  
It belongs in a museum!
 
2014-09-01 09:50:20 PM  
csb: I had to take a business trip to DC in the '80s and toured Jamestown. At the glass-blowers, I found them producing bottles of Rainier Beer for a TV production. They never heard of the brand...it was a Washington State beer brewed in Seattle, and distributed only in the western states. Ten years later, I saw the bottles on "Longmire".
\End Csb:
 
2014-09-01 09:54:45 PM  
The first "Samuel Jacckson" beer.
 
2014-09-01 09:58:21 PM  
What a hassle to brew their own, why not just pick up a half barrel at the package store?
 
2014-09-01 09:58:33 PM  
There's a somewhat interesting story about where the folks who opened that college got the money to do so.
 
2014-09-01 10:03:29 PM  
If the university doesn't open a tribute brewery and fund scholarships out of it, I shall be disappoint.

(I'm going to be disappointed aren't I?)
 
2014-09-01 10:05:10 PM  
Growing hops is that area would be hard and the quality would be sub par.  Still beer would have better than drinking the local water.
 
2014-09-01 10:05:46 PM  
Surprising absolutely nobody.
 
2014-09-01 10:05:46 PM  
Williamsburg Alewerks down the street, the Cheese Shop loaded with craft beer in the wine cellar, bar in the University Center basement, local restaurants not always picky about checking ID, and are people really surprised that the college used to have a brewery on campus?
 
2014-09-01 10:08:24 PM  
i_dig_chicks: Growing hops is that area would be hard and the quality would be sub par. Still beer would have better than drinking the local water.

I find these hops shallow and pedantic.
 
2014-09-01 10:14:22 PM  

BullStrings: Tfa: Small beer just means it were second or third brew and less alcoholic, like an ale today," he said.

I know some ales that get up to 12 - 15%


I always thought the difference between an ale and lager was top-fermenting yeast vs. bottom-fermenting yeast. I can't remember which is which though.
 
2014-09-01 10:17:17 PM  
dailydose.dreamlocal.com

This expedition is being led by Top Men.
\ Who?
\\ TOP MEN.
 
2014-09-01 10:23:17 PM  

47 is the new 42: BullStrings: Tfa: Small beer just means it were second or third brew and less alcoholic, like an ale today," he said.

I know some ales that get up to 12 - 15%

I always thought the difference between an ale and lager was top-fermenting yeast vs. bottom-fermenting yeast. I can't remember which is which though.


Look to find some double and triple ipas...
 
2014-09-01 10:31:41 PM  

Dirtysnipe: What a hassle to brew their own, why not just pick up a half barrel at the package store?


Because Virginia is an ABC state. Duh!
 
2014-09-01 11:00:38 PM  

ultraholland: i_dig_chicks: Growing hops is that area would be hard and the quality would be sub par. Still beer would have better than drinking the local water.

I find these hops shallow and pedantic.


I prefer leaps.
 
2014-09-01 11:10:32 PM  

BullStrings: Tfa: Small beer just means it were second or third brew and less alcoholic, like an ale today," he said.

I know some ales that get up to 12 - 15%


If you want to get a brew up to that level, you have to start with ale/beer yeast, then cider yeast, then wine yeast, then champagne yeast. Too much fuss for a drink that will knock you out after only 1 or 2 glasses.
 
2014-09-01 11:23:23 PM  

ol' gormsby: BullStrings: Tfa: Small beer just means it were second or third brew and less alcoholic, like an ale today," he said.

I know some ales that get up to 12 - 15%

If you want to get a brew up to that level, you have to start with ale/beer yeast, then cider yeast, then wine yeast, then champagne yeast. Too much fuss for a drink that will knock you out after only 1 or 2 glasses.


two glasses of a fifteen abv will knock me out?
 
2014-09-01 11:41:16 PM  

chitownmike: ol' gormsby: BullStrings: Tfa: Small beer just means it were second or third brew and less alcoholic, like an ale today," he said.

I know some ales that get up to 12 - 15%

If you want to get a brew up to that level, you have to start with ale/beer yeast, then cider yeast, then wine yeast, then champagne yeast. Too much fuss for a drink that will knock you out after only 1 or 2 glasses.

two glasses of a fifteen abv will knock me out?


Maybe not knock you out drunk, but for how heavy a 12-15% beer is I'd fall asleep about half way into the second one.
 
2014-09-02 12:09:57 AM  

chitownmike: ol' gormsby: BullStrings: Tfa: Small beer just means it were second or third brew and less alcoholic, like an ale today," he said.

I know some ales that get up to 12 - 15%

If you want to get a brew up to that level, you have to start with ale/beer yeast, then cider yeast, then wine yeast, then champagne yeast. Too much fuss for a drink that will knock you out after only 1 or 2 glasses.

two glasses of a fifteen abv will knock me out?


Figuratively speaking. Wasn't trying to insult you........
 
2014-09-02 01:02:26 AM  
They also have Chick A Fil.
 
2014-09-02 02:20:09 AM  

BullStrings: Tfa: Small beer just means it were second or third brew and less alcoholic, like an ale today," he said.

I know some ales that get up to 12 - 15%


Mmmmmmmmmm, abbey ale.
 
2014-09-02 02:21:38 AM  

Herne2009: If the university doesn't open a tribute brewery and fund scholarships out of it, I shall be disappoint.

(I'm going to be disappointed aren't I?)


Drugs are bad, m'kay.
 
2014-09-02 02:23:22 AM  

ol' gormsby: BullStrings: Tfa: Small beer just means it were second or third brew and less alcoholic, like an ale today," he said.

I know some ales that get up to 12 - 15%

If you want to get a brew up to that level, you have to start with ale/beer yeast, then cider yeast, then wine yeast, then champagne yeast. Too much fuss for a drink that will knock you out after only 1 or 2 glasses.


No one likes a quitter.
 
2014-09-02 07:42:31 AM  

BullStrings: 47 is the new 42: BullStrings: Tfa: Small beer just means it were second or third brew and less alcoholic, like an ale today," he said.

I know some ales that get up to 12 - 15%

I always thought the difference between an ale and lager was top-fermenting yeast vs. bottom-fermenting yeast. I can't remember which is which though.

Look to find some double and triple ipas...


Top fermenting yeast is ale- which ferment at higher temps. Bottom fermenting is lager yeast, which ferment at cooler temps. Strength isn't really determined by your yeast so much.
 
2014-09-02 07:46:41 AM  

StoPPeRmobile: ol' gormsby: BullStrings: Tfa: Small beer just means it were second or third brew and less alcoholic, like an ale today," he said.

I know some ales that get up to 12 - 15%

If you want to get a brew up to that level, you have to start with ale/beer yeast, then cider yeast, then wine yeast, then champagne yeast. Too much fuss for a drink that will knock you out after only 1 or 2 glasses.

No one likes a quitter.


Cider yeasts are ale yeasts, for the most part. I've never heard of stepping yeast the way that's mentioned here: got an example? Where did you hear of this? I'm rather curious.
 
2014-09-02 11:50:25 AM  

mainsail: StoPPeRmobile: ol' gormsby: BullStrings: Tfa: Small beer just means it were second or third brew and less alcoholic, like an ale today," he said.

I know some ales that get up to 12 - 15%

If you want to get a brew up to that level, you have to start with ale/beer yeast, then cider yeast, then wine yeast, then champagne yeast. Too much fuss for a drink that will knock you out after only 1 or 2 glasses.

No one likes a quitter.

Cider yeasts are ale yeasts, for the most part. I've never heard of stepping yeast the way that's mentioned here: got an example? Where did you hear of this? I'm rather curious.


IDK about lager vs ale vs cider  yeasts, but I do know different yeast strains will die off at different alcohol concentrations.  That's why wine strains and champagne strains are different.  Champagne strains have to start growing and fermenting in wine where the wine strain has died either because of the alcohol concentration or all the available sugars have been consumed, so they tend to be able to survive higher alcohol concentrations.
 
2014-09-02 12:17:22 PM  

stan unusual: mainsail: StoPPeRmobile: ol' gormsby: BullStrings: Tfa: Small beer just means it were second or third brew and less alcoholic, like an ale today," he said.

I know some ales that get up to 12 - 15%

If you want to get a brew up to that level, you have to start with ale/beer yeast, then cider yeast, then wine yeast, then champagne yeast. Too much fuss for a drink that will knock you out after only 1 or 2 glasses.

No one likes a quitter.

Cider yeasts are ale yeasts, for the most part. I've never heard of stepping yeast the way that's mentioned here: got an example? Where did you hear of this? I'm rather curious.

IDK about lager vs ale vs cider  yeasts, but I do know different yeast strains will die off at different alcohol concentrations.  That's why wine strains and champagne strains are different.  Champagne strains have to start growing and fermenting in wine where the wine strain has died either because of the alcohol concentration or all the available sugars have been consumed, so they tend to be able to survive higher alcohol concentrations.


Yes- but pitching Pasteur Champagne on top of (say) Cote des Blanc will only raise the alcohol percentage by a little bit- and dry the flavor of whatever you pitched it into, as residual sugars get used up. If you pitch even distiller's yeast into that, it's not going to have much to work with, and you run a pretty good risk of autolysis, if I'm not mistaken. If your goal is to have a high alcohol wine or beer, use distillers yeast from the beginning, although it'll probably taste....well, brewing like that, let's say that taste is going to be touch and go. But the only time I know of when different yeast strains are used is when a bottling yeast is necessary- but then, there's always somewhere out there I can learn from.
 
2014-09-02 12:45:19 PM  

mainsail: stan unusual: mainsail: StoPPeRmobile: ol' gormsby: BullStrings: Tfa: Small beer just means it were second or third brew and less alcoholic, like an ale today," he said.

I know some ales that get up to 12 - 15%

If you want to get a brew up to that level, you have to start with ale/beer yeast, then cider yeast, then wine yeast, then champagne yeast. Too much fuss for a drink that will knock you out after only 1 or 2 glasses.

No one likes a quitter.

Cider yeasts are ale yeasts, for the most part. I've never heard of stepping yeast the way that's mentioned here: got an example? Where did you hear of this? I'm rather curious.

IDK about lager vs ale vs cider  yeasts, but I do know different yeast strains will die off at different alcohol concentrations.  That's why wine strains and champagne strains are different.  Champagne strains have to start growing and fermenting in wine where the wine strain has died either because of the alcohol concentration or all the available sugars have been consumed, so they tend to be able to survive higher alcohol concentrations.

Yes- but pitching Pasteur Champagne on top of (say) Cote des Blanc will only raise the alcohol percentage by a little bit- and dry the flavor of whatever you pitched it into, as residual sugars get used up. If you pitch even distiller's yeast into that, it's not going to have much to work with, and you run a pretty good risk of autolysis, if I'm not mistaken. If your goal is to have a high alcohol wine or beer, use distillers yeast from the beginning, although it'll probably taste....well, brewing like that, let's say that taste is going to be touch and go. But the only time I know of when different yeast strains are used is when a bottling yeast is necessary- but then, there's always somewhere out there I can learn from.


Which is why they add additional sugar for the secondary fermentation, right?
 
2014-09-02 03:08:32 PM  

stan unusual: mainsail: stan unusual: mainsail: StoPPeRmobile: ol' gormsby: BullStrings: Tfa: Small beer just means it were second or third brew and less alcoholic, like an ale today," he said.

I know some ales that get up to 12 - 15%

If you want to get a brew up to that level, you have to start with ale/beer yeast, then cider yeast, then wine yeast, then champagne yeast. Too much fuss for a drink that will knock you out after only 1 or 2 glasses.

No one likes a quitter.

Cider yeasts are ale yeasts, for the most part. I've never heard of stepping yeast the way that's mentioned here: got an example? Where did you hear of this? I'm rather curious.

IDK about lager vs ale vs cider  yeasts, but I do know different yeast strains will die off at different alcohol concentrations.  That's why wine strains and champagne strains are different.  Champagne strains have to start growing and fermenting in wine where the wine strain has died either because of the alcohol concentration or all the available sugars have been consumed, so they tend to be able to survive higher alcohol concentrations.

Yes- but pitching Pasteur Champagne on top of (say) Cote des Blanc will only raise the alcohol percentage by a little bit- and dry the flavor of whatever you pitched it into, as residual sugars get used up. If you pitch even distiller's yeast into that, it's not going to have much to work with, and you run a pretty good risk of autolysis, if I'm not mistaken. If your goal is to have a high alcohol wine or beer, use distillers yeast from the beginning, although it'll probably taste....well, brewing like that, let's say that taste is going to be touch and go. But the only time I know of when different yeast strains are used is when a bottling yeast is necessary- but then, there's always somewhere out there I can learn from.

Which is why they add additional sugar for the secondary fermentation, right?


No; generally sugar isn't added in a secondary ferment: chaptalization happens in primary (in wine) or in the boil for beer. The reason it's added in primary after fermentation starts is exactly because the yeast are fresh enough to be able to handle it...assuming you pitched enough yeast... Interestingly, you want fermentation in primary to go on for two or three days before you add the chaptalizing sugar because you want the yeast to prefer the grape/fruit/whatever sugars over the cane/whatever sugar you're using- they adapt that quickly.(but enough will eat the sugar added to make it of value). Secondary ferment smoothes out flavor and clarifies beer, and wine, Some sugar may be added at bottling for bottle-conditioned beer, or if you're casking/kegging and want natural carbonation to take place, but that's a small amount that's only to get the yeast to make bubbles. Bottling yeasts are usually there to boost beers that have been in secondary for a longer period of time, and they need the reinforcements to make bubbles. Like with Champagne or other sparkling wine. Whoops- fruit- also not going to boost alcohol too much.
 
2014-09-02 03:32:58 PM  
Oh, and, er, you don't really want to add fruit to beer in primary, because the huge amount of CO2 produced will strip the aromatics out of the fruit, mostly. Mutes the flavor. And if you aren't careful, introduces an unpredictable wild yeast, potentially.
 
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