Do you have adblock enabled?
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Wikipedia)   100 years ago today, the last Passenger Pigeon died at the St. Louis zoo   (en.wikipedia.org) divider line 71
    More: Sad, Southern Ontario, American Patagioenas, Cincinnati Zoo, Choctaw, epithets, North Florida, New France, loss of habitat  
•       •       •

3185 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Sep 2014 at 8:22 AM (47 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



71 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2014-09-01 03:51:25 AM  
Martha, thought to be the world's last passenger pigeon, died on September 1, 1914, at the Cincinnati Zoo.

WTF dumbassmitter?
 
2014-09-01 05:03:02 AM  
But let 's not blame man for the eradication of an entire species.

Because that would be impolite.
 
2014-09-01 08:08:53 AM  
... it was delicious.
 
2014-09-01 08:25:05 AM  

www.tastespotting.com


R.I.P.

 
2014-09-01 08:31:21 AM  
Is this the thread where someone tries to make us feel guilty for the domination of man over the entire world?
 
2014-09-01 08:39:06 AM  

image2.findagrave.com

R I P

 
2014-09-01 08:40:51 AM  

whidbey: But let 's not blame man for the eradication of an entire species.

Because that would be impolite.


Don't you know? The world is too big, man can't have that much impact.

Or... if man did wipe out the passenger pigeon, it was Gods will!
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-09-01 08:47:56 AM  
...and nobody got to eat it because the corpse had been promised to a museum.
 
2014-09-01 08:50:44 AM  

Lsherm: Martha, thought to be the world's last passenger pigeon, died on September 1, 1914, at the Cincinnati Zoo.

WTF dumbassmitter?


Don't know what you're objecting to. Subby's quoting the Wikipedia article.

The pigeon was nicknamed "Martha"
To the best of their knowledge, it was the last passenger pigeon in existence.
It died on September 1, 1914 at the Cincinnati Zoo
Cincinnati is spelled correctly.
 
2014-09-01 08:52:42 AM  
I blame cats.
 
2014-09-01 08:57:36 AM  

NutWrench: Lsherm: Martha, thought to be the world's last passenger pigeon, died on September 1, 1914, at the Cincinnati Zoo.

WTF dumbassmitter?

Don't know what you're objecting to. Subby's quoting the Wikipedia article.

The pigeon was nicknamed "Martha"
To the best of their knowledge, it was the last passenger pigeon in existence.
It died on September 1, 1914 at the Cincinnati Zoo
Cincinnati is spelled correctly.


The headline reads "100 years ago today, the last Passenger Pigeon died at the St. Louis zoo" for me.
 
2014-09-01 08:58:22 AM  
This is dastardly and muttley's fault!
 
2014-09-01 09:00:45 AM  

DubyaHater: Is this the thread where someone tries to make us feel guilty for the domination of man over the entire world?


www.audublog.org

Yes ... yes it is
 
2014-09-01 09:08:20 AM  
One hundred years later, some towns are trying to make the Uber Passenger extinct, too.

static5.businessinsider.com
 
2014-09-01 09:19:33 AM  
When I was a boy, flocks of Black Cockatoos would fly past from nowhere. 60+ strong in the flock. Bigassed birds, too - 2nd largest species of parrot IIRC. Very impressive sight.

Sometimes you'd be at a park and they'd all perch in a bunch of conifer trees and chow down for 20 minutes and move on. They famously stripped our two back-yard almond trees in a sitting, three or four summers in a row. An amazing experience I'll never forget, to see 60-70 of these massive wild parrots just 15 feet above me.

Flocks have been getting smaller, often less than 10 nowadays. Coz they live so long I think it took a while for scientists/environmentalists to latch on that there was a problem - that there were very few youngsters in the flocks. Human population growth, urban sprawl, and deforestation are to blame, naturally.

Yesterday I saw a flock of one - COUNT 'EM, one, fly over my house. Sad.
 
2014-09-01 09:21:08 AM  

Big Ramifications: When I was a boy, flocks of Black Cockatoos would fly past from nowhere. 60+ strong in the flock. Bigassed birds, too - 2nd largest species of parrot IIRC. Very impressive sight.

Sometimes you'd be at a park and they'd all perch in a bunch of conifer trees and chow down for 20 minutes and move on. They famously stripped our two back-yard almond trees in a sitting, three or four summers in a row. An amazing experience I'll never forget, to see 60-70 of these massive wild parrots just 15 feet above me.

Flocks have been getting smaller, often less than 10 nowadays. Coz they live so long I think it took a while for scientists/environmentalists to latch on that there was a problem - that there were very few youngsters in the flocks. Human population growth, urban sprawl, and deforestation are to blame, naturally.

Yesterday I saw a flock of one - COUNT 'EM, one, fly over my house. Sad.


ps: I am 108 years old.
 
2014-09-01 09:30:12 AM  

poison_amy: NutWrench: Lsherm: Martha, thought to be the world's last passenger pigeon, died on September 1, 1914, at the Cincinnati Zoo.

WTF dumbassmitter?

Don't know what you're objecting to. Subby's quoting the Wikipedia article.

The pigeon was nicknamed "Martha"
To the best of their knowledge, it was the last passenger pigeon in existence.
It died on September 1, 1914 at the Cincinnati Zoo
Cincinnati is spelled correctly.

The headline reads "100 years ago today, the last Passenger Pigeon died at the St. Louis zoo" for me.


The dodo bird is another famous extinct pigeon. Maybe.

I always thought it was a flightless seagull / albatross type creature, thanks to all the illustrations I had seen over the years. The boffin who first posited that the dodo was a close relative of the pigeon almost got ran out of town. Which is often the case in the catty, clannish scientific world.

But in the ensuing years a few other propeller-heads have backed this guy up - the dodo  does have uncanny pigeon-like taxonomy. I assume it's all there on the dodo Wiki page[?].
 
2014-09-01 09:35:51 AM  

poison_amy: NutWrench: Lsherm: Martha, thought to be the world's last passenger pigeon, died on September 1, 1914, at the Cincinnati Zoo.

WTF dumbassmitter?

Don't know what you're objecting to. Subby's quoting the Wikipedia article.

The pigeon was nicknamed "Martha"
To the best of their knowledge, it was the last passenger pigeon in existence.
It died on September 1, 1914 at the Cincinnati Zoo
Cincinnati is spelled correctly.

The headline reads "100 years ago today, the last Passenger Pigeon died at the St. Louis zoo" for me.


Maybe we're not eating the right mushroom for today's reality.
 
2014-09-01 09:36:12 AM  
Back in the mid '80s in Hammond, IN, I saw a flock of birds that was so big I couldn't see either end. No clue what kind of birds they were. That must be what the passenger pigeon flocks looked like.
 
2014-09-01 09:45:01 AM  

leevis: Back in the mid '80s in Hammond, IN, I saw a flock of birds that was so big I couldn't see either end. No clue what kind of birds they were. That must be what the passenger pigeon flocks looked like.


Sounds like starlings. Passenger pigeons were long gone by then.
 
2014-09-01 09:53:51 AM  

DubyaHater: Is this the thread where someone tries to make us feel guilty for the domination of man over the entire world?


No, this is the tread where we get reminded on how quickly any species can go from top of the heap to the shiathouse, and would be wise to take note.

Not that we will, of course.  The end of humans on the planet will be just as swift.
 
2014-09-01 09:56:19 AM  

AMonkey'sUncle: leevis: Back in the mid '80s in Hammond, IN, I saw a flock of birds that was so big I couldn't see either end. No clue what kind of birds they were. That must be what the passenger pigeon flocks looked like.

Sounds like starlings. Passenger pigeons were long gone by then.


They were probably seagulls. I hear that a flock of seagulls were everywhere in the 80's.
 
2014-09-01 09:57:48 AM  

whidbey: But let 's not blame man for the eradication of an entire species.

Because that would be impolite.


I have it on good authority by climate change deniers that people can't have massively disruptive effects on the planet.
 
2014-09-01 10:03:48 AM  

Dinki: whidbey: But let 's not blame man for the eradication of an entire species.

Because that would be impolite.

Don't you know? The world is too big, man can't have that much impact.

Or... if man did wipe out the passenger pigeon, it was Gods will!


God shouldn't have made so himselfdamned delicious!
 
2014-09-01 10:09:49 AM  

Tyrone Slothrop: whidbey: But let 's not blame man for the eradication of an entire species.

Because that would be impolite.

I have it on good authority by climate change deniers that people can't have massively disruptive effects on the planet.


That can't be right. Computer models indicate that the loss of the reflectivity of passenger pigeons raised Pennsylvania temperatures by 0.001K. Totally disruptive.
 
2014-09-01 10:11:53 AM  
Extra sad.  When he died, his luggage was in Cleavland awaiting a connecting to flight to Chicago where it would be bussed to Des Moines and then put on a fast freight to the Cincinnati area of St. Louis.
 
2014-09-01 10:21:20 AM  

Dinki: whidbey: But let 's not blame man for the eradication of an entire species.

Because that would be impolite.

Don't you know? The world is too big, man can't have that much impact.

Or... if man did wipe out the passenger pigeon, it was Gods will!


God is extinct to because man ate him.
 
2014-09-01 10:25:43 AM  

whidbey: But let 's not blame man for the eradication of an entire species.

Because that would be impolite.


Who was suggesting that we don't... exactly?

My guess is that you're just pulling things out of your ass, again.
 
2014-09-01 10:25:46 AM  

JRoo: [www.tastespotting.com image 600x450]
R.I.P.


Laughter O L.


/*shakes wing*
 
2014-09-01 10:26:22 AM  
I heard about cloning them now
/or using a 3D printer
 
2014-09-01 10:27:01 AM  
A prime example of why market hunting was more or less ended.

I've been reading the archives, and grass hoppers were a major pest in the 1920s. I can't help but think that massive flocks of passenger pigeons had once been part of the natural controls to keep grasshoppers in check.
 
2014-09-01 10:36:37 AM  

wildcardjack: A prime example of why market hunting was more or less ended.

I've been reading the archives, and grass hoppers were a major pest in the 1920s. I can't help but think that massive flocks of passenger pigeons had once been part of the natural controls to keep grasshoppers in check.


There is no way hunting was the main cause of this extinction.
 
2014-09-01 10:38:08 AM  
Passenger pigeon, Dodo, Ivory-billed Woodpecker, Carolina Parrot all gone.  Soon to be followed by the Rusty Blackbird, Kirkland Warbler, Red-cockaded Woodpecker, Golden cheeked Warbler, Bachman Sparrow, Cerulean Warbler.... fark it... the list is too long...

And, that is just a couple of the many birds that are headed the way of the passenger pigeon.  There are numerous species of creatures that will likely be gone in the next couple of decades.  The once most numerous species of butterfly in North America, the Monarch, is in horrible decline, along with a huge number of other butterflies due in great part to farm herbicides destroying their host plants and loss of habitat.  While I have seen several Viceroys (look alike species) I haven't seen but one Monarch all year.  Really sad.
 
2014-09-01 10:39:15 AM  

SacriliciousBeerSwiller: There is no way hunting was the main cause of this extinction.


how would the annual killing of hundreds of millions of birds possibly deplete their numbers to a point of no return?
 
2014-09-01 10:39:57 AM  

AMonkey'sUncle: leevis: Back in the mid '80s in Hammond, IN, I saw a flock of birds that was so big I couldn't see either end. No clue what kind of birds they were. That must be what the passenger pigeon flocks looked like.

Sounds like starlings. Passenger pigeons were long gone by then.


Starlings, which are an invasive species, filled the niche left behind by the passenger pigeon. I'm not sure when they arrived, but I'm guessing they probably contributed to the passenger pigeons' demise.
 
2014-09-01 10:56:23 AM  
Just how big were those damn things that they could carry passengers?!?
 
2014-09-01 10:58:15 AM  

big pig peaches: AMonkey'sUncle: leevis: Back in the mid '80s in Hammond, IN, I saw a flock of birds that was so big I couldn't see either end. No clue what kind of birds they were. That must be what the passenger pigeon flocks looked like.

Sounds like starlings. Passenger pigeons were long gone by then.

Starlings, which are an invasive species, filled the niche left behind by the passenger pigeon. I'm not sure when they arrived, but I'm guessing they probably contributed to the passenger pigeons' demise.


they arrived during the Victorian era, they were imported by a minister that had a thing for Shakespeare and brought over breeding sets of every animal mentioned in a play to america and released them into the wild.
 
2014-09-01 11:18:03 AM  

SacriliciousBeerSwiller: wildcardjack: A prime example of why market hunting was more or less ended.

I've been reading the archives, and grass hoppers were a major pest in the 1920s. I can't help but think that massive flocks of passenger pigeons had once been part of the natural controls to keep grasshoppers in check.

There is no way hunting was the main cause of this extinction.


You're confusing modern American hunting...which, asshole poachers aside, tends to have a conservationist element...which the hunting our forefathers practiced, which was all about the most meat/feathers/hides for the least effort.

Hunting was indeed the primary cause of the passenger pigeon's extinction.
 
2014-09-01 11:18:54 AM  
 
2014-09-01 11:20:30 AM  
...are we sure these pigeons are extinct? Because I swear I just saw a whole flock of them zoom over my head right after I ate these delicious looking mushrooms I read about in the paper.
 
2014-09-01 11:25:38 AM  
I've seen a couple of taxidermied ones at the Lone Star brewery in Texas.Also heard in documentaries regarding the demise of these critters that hunters could come upon a group of 200-300 birds, and run out of shells blowing the little critters away. Supposedly the down was pretty good.
This criiter begs for some screen time when they ressurect "Futurama" again.
 
2014-09-01 11:33:05 AM  
There are some birds I wouldn't mind seeing the back of.  Seagulls, being one.
 
2014-09-01 11:35:52 AM  

big pig peaches: AMonkey'sUncle: leevis: Back in the mid '80s in Hammond, IN, I saw a flock of birds that was so big I couldn't see either end. No clue what kind of birds they were. That must be what the passenger pigeon flocks looked like.

Sounds like starlings. Passenger pigeons were long gone by then.

Starlings, which are an invasive species, filled the niche left behind by the passenger pigeon. I'm not sure when they arrived, but I'm guessing they probably contributed to the passenger pigeons' demise.


FWIW: "The European Starling was introduced into North America when the "American Acclimatization Society" for European settlers released some 80-100 birds in Central Park (New York City) in 1890-91. The head of this particular organization, Eugene Scheiffelin, desired to introduce all birds ever mentioned in the works of William Shakespeare."

So because one man wanted Shakespeare's fauna in the US, this very invasive bird is here. They will kick woodpeckers out of their nests, among other atrocious behavior.

The only good thing I've heard about them is they eat Japanese beetle larvae in lawns.
 
2014-09-01 11:42:33 AM  

Ex-Texan: I've seen a couple of taxidermied ones at the Lone Star brewery in Texas.Also heard in documentaries regarding the demise of these critters that hunters could come upon a group of 200-300 birds, and run out of shells blowing the little critters away. Supposedly the down was pretty good.
This criiter begs for some screen time when they ressurect "Futurama" again.




Do you mean the Pearl brewery? Was there a two headed lamb there also?
 
2014-09-01 11:51:36 AM  

DubyaHater: Is this the thread where someone tries to make us feel guilty for the domination of man over the entire world?


I had this discussion with someone who I worked for in high school.

My girlfriend at the time was a vegetarian.  He scoffed and told me the Bible said that God gave Man dominion over the beasts of Earth.  I pointed out that dominion did not mean it was required to kill and eat everything, and could be interpreted to mean that we were entrusted to ensure the beasts' survival, given that God created Man to continue his creation and not destroy it.

He never brought it up again, and neither did I.
 
2014-09-01 11:55:57 AM  

Demonrats: AMonkey'sUncle: leevis: Back in the mid '80s in Hammond, IN, I saw a flock of birds that was so big I couldn't see either end. No clue what kind of birds they were. That must be what the passenger pigeon flocks looked like.

Sounds like starlings. Passenger pigeons were long gone by then.

They were probably seagulls. I hear that a flock of seagulls were everywhere in the 80's.


I saw a flock of seagulls like that once.  I was a child and the experience scared me so much that I ran.  I ran so far away.  I ran all night and day, but couldn't get away.
 
2014-09-01 11:58:19 AM  

poison_amy: NutWrench: Lsherm: Martha, thought to be the world's last passenger pigeon, died on September 1, 1914, at the Cincinnati Zoo.

WTF dumbassmitter?

Don't know what you're objecting to. Subby's quoting the Wikipedia article.

The pigeon was nicknamed "Martha"
To the best of their knowledge, it was the last passenger pigeon in existence.
It died on September 1, 1914 at the Cincinnati Zoo
Cincinnati is spelled correctly.

The headline reads "100 years ago today, the last Passenger Pigeon died at the St. Louis zoo" for me.


It says different things for different people.  For me it says 100 years ago today, the last Passenger Pigeon died at the hands of Dastardly and Muttley.
 
2014-09-01 12:03:00 PM  

whidbey: But let 's not blame man for the eradication of an entire species.

Because that would be impolite.


I guess I'm going to have to add dumbass to anti-Semitic on your farkie label.

/are you really that stupid, or is it all part of the act?
 
2014-09-01 12:03:54 PM  

SacriliciousBeerSwiller: wildcardjack: A prime example of why market hunting was more or less ended.

I've been reading the archives, and grass hoppers were a major pest in the 1920s. I can't help but think that massive flocks of passenger pigeons had once been part of the natural controls to keep grasshoppers in check.

There is no way hunting was the main cause of this extinction.


Well, extremely overzealous hunting combined with the way the passenger pigeon apparently couldn't breed/rear young unless they were in a giant group/swarm/hive/whatever they were called.

Seriously, if your comment was not snark, I suggest reading about the passenger pigeon and the circumstances leading up to its extinction.  Us tool-using alpha hunters most certainly did take advantage of some rather poor habits of that species and overhunted that sucker down to the ground.

I mean, imagine what the deer population would be like if there was no season, no limit, and McDonald's was buying up all the deer meat you could supply them in order to make McVension burgers.
 
2014-09-01 12:42:17 PM  

PunGent: You're confusing modern American hunting...which, asshole poachers aside, tends to have a conservationist element...which the hunting our forefathers practiced, which was all about the most meat/feathers/hides for the least effort.
Hunting was indeed the primary cause of the passenger pigeon's extinction.


Yes, we've advanced so much since those dark days. There's no way that we could do something like that today, say with entire fish species or something like that. They're not even on land where we can see them.

www.grida.no
 
Displayed 50 of 71 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
Advertisement
On Twitter






In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report