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(KMBZ Kansas City)   On this day, 30 years ago, America had a manned space program   (kmbz.com) divider line 33
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1712 clicks; posted to Geek » on 30 Aug 2014 at 8:11 PM (37 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-08-30 06:03:52 PM  
On this date in 2014 we still have a manned space program.

d1jqu7g1y74ds1.cloudfront.net
 
2014-08-30 07:20:34 PM  
We just pay the Russians for jitney service now.
 
2014-08-30 08:21:14 PM  
What a real space program looks like...
dl.dropboxusercontent.com

Large Marge sent me: On this date in 2014 we still have a manned space program.

[d1jqu7g1y74ds1.cloudfront.net image 850x557]


Only an earth observation program, and only so far as Putin allows it.

The problem is we aren't doing anything to rebuild our system,  so once the ISS is done then there's not much but robots in our future.
Sure they talk about SLS, but its just a booster without an upper stage. An obsolete and expensive design at that.
Chances of is surviving the next few election cycles are slim.

Its not like we don't know how to make more affordable and better spacecraft, its that no politician has made this their focus.

dl.dropboxusercontent.comdl.dropboxusercontent.com
 
2014-08-30 08:25:32 PM  
Jebediah approves.

/Kerbals!
 
2014-08-30 08:57:45 PM  
Funny - According to my memory, and Wikipedia, the first Shuttle flight occurred on April 12, 1981. And that was a manned flight. The shuttle never went up unmanned.
 
2014-08-30 09:08:43 PM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: Funny - According to my memory, and Wikipedia, the first Shuttle flight occurred on April 12, 1981. And that was a manned flight. The shuttle never went up unmanned.


RTFA
 
2014-08-30 09:23:58 PM  

way south: what a real space program looks like...


You misspelled Voyager

astro.physics.uiowa.edu
 
2014-08-30 09:41:57 PM  
As a child I dreamed of us going back to the moon. Now, we'll be luck to maintain LEO in my lifetime.

I wish it was just the current administration, but this and been building for decades.

I can't believe how apathetic the current generation is to our space program. We learn so much, and it costs us so little in return.

I guess I'll go back to watching real world, or whatever the unwashed masses get off on.
 
2014-08-30 09:44:14 PM  
Once we were giants.
 
2014-08-30 09:45:14 PM  

way south: Its not like we don't know how to make more affordable and better spacecraft, its that no politician has made this their focus.


Which is why it was a great move on the part of NASA to start contracting for space flights. NASA still has the SLS program, but with space station duties contracted out to private companies, NASA can concentrate on getting beyond Earth orbit.

Things are moving very quickly quickly in regard to private manned spaceflight. It's amazing to see this private space race happening. And it's all thanks to NASA.
 
2014-08-30 10:28:15 PM  

bearded clamorer: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: Funny - According to my memory, and Wikipedia, the first Shuttle flight occurred on April 12, 1981. And that was a manned flight. The shuttle never went up unmanned.

RTFA

I really don't see the point of the article. So what if the Discovery launched for the first time 30 years ago? It wasn't the first shuttle, the second shuttle, or even the last shuttle.
 
2014-08-30 10:39:44 PM  

devine: As a child I dreamed of us going back to the moon. Now, we'll be luck to maintain LEO in my lifetime.

I wish it was just the current administration, but this and been building for decades.

I can't believe how apathetic the current generation is to our space program. We learn so much, and it costs us so little in return.

I guess I'll go back to watching real world, or whatever the unwashed masses get off on.


This is the downside of democracy. Only things which fire the public imagination get funded. And, by and large, people are idiots.
 
2014-08-30 10:46:06 PM  
Hey. It's that thread where people who pay so little attention to the space program that they think it's gone talk about how pissed they are about it.
 
2014-08-30 11:13:32 PM  

Baron Harkonnen: way south: Its not like we don't know how to make more affordable and better spacecraft, its that no politician has made this their focus.

Which is why it was a great move on the part of NASA to start contracting for space flights. NASA still has the SLS program, but with space station duties contracted out to private companies, NASA can concentrate on getting beyond Earth orbit.

Things are moving very quickly quickly in regard to private manned spaceflight. It's amazing to see this private space race happening. And it's all thanks to NASA.




Don't get my hopes up.
If it wasn't for bad luck, NASA would have no luck with its programs. Its consistently traded good systems for worse systems based on who was contracted and which congressional district they were based in.
Commercial crew has been one of the few good things going, but they keep trying to force a downselect (for which Boeing has been staged to win).
Until we see both the Dream Chaser and the reusable Falcon fully operational, I wouldn't put it beyond them to wreck what little progress exists.

There's alot of money on the line for the old keepers of the rocket flame.
 
2014-08-30 11:26:34 PM  
On this day 30 years ago, America had a budget-sapping boondoggle that was poorly-designed thanks to meddling from the Pentagon and killed 14 astronauts and was a nightmare to maintain in it's last wretched years before it was finally shut down several decades too late.

FTFY, Subbo.
 
2014-08-30 11:29:35 PM  

2wolves: Once we were giants.


So was this guy:

fanboysinc.com
 
2014-08-31 12:12:53 AM  

devine: As a child I dreamed of us going back to the moon. Now, we'll be luck to maintain LEO in my lifetime.

I wish it was just the current administration, but this and been building for decades.

I can't believe how apathetic the current generation is to our space program. We learn so much, and it costs us so little in return.

I guess I'll go back to watching real world, or whatever the unwashed masses get off on.


NASA is in the doldrums a bit, but a second space age is currently emerging.

Unless you are very old or sick, you'll see us move forward.
 
2014-08-31 12:42:02 AM  

Tobin_Lam: bearded clamorer: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: Funny - According to my memory, and Wikipedia, the first Shuttle flight occurred on April 12, 1981. And that was a manned flight. The shuttle never went up unmanned.

RTFA
I really don't see the point of the article. So what if the Discovery launched for the first time 30 years ago? It wasn't the first shuttle, the second shuttle, or even the last shuttle.


It's the first space-flown shuttle that ended up in one piece.
 
2014-08-31 01:19:47 AM  

way south: What a real space program looks like...
[dl.dropboxusercontent.com image 850x855]

Large Marge sent me: On this date in 2014 we still have a manned space program.

[d1jqu7g1y74ds1.cloudfront.net image 850x557]

Only an earth observation program, and only so far as Putin allows it.

The problem is we aren't doing anything to rebuild our system,  so once the ISS is done then there's not much but robots in our future.
Sure they talk about SLS, but its just a booster without an upper stage. An obsolete and expensive design at that.
Chances of is surviving the next few election cycles are slim.

Its not like we don't know how to make more affordable and better spacecraft, its that no politician has made this their focus.

[dl.dropboxusercontent.com image 490x326][dl.dropboxusercontent.com image 575x329]


That first picture you posted is like the Mona Lisa to me. I could stare at it for hours at a time just thinking and contemplating. That's art. That's beauty. That's what we're here for. A couple of guys put on some bulky suits and strapped themselves to a pillar of explosives that guided them straight to the god damn moon with less computing power than you carry in your pocket. That is a triumph, that tops damn near everything else we've managed to pull off. Love that picture.
 
2014-08-31 06:58:09 AM  

Occam's Disposable Razor: That first picture you posted is like the Mona Lisa to me. I could stare at it for hours at a time just thinking and contemplating. That's art. That's beauty. That's what we're here for. A couple of guys put on some bulky suits and strapped themselves to a pillar of explosives that guided them straight to the god damn moon with less computing power than you carry in your pocket. That is a triumph, that tops damn near everything else we've managed to pull off. Love that picture


Indeed.  This is the very essence of human achievement.  It's amazing that the generation that was raised with this as their high water mark never strived to go beyond it.
 
2014-08-31 07:46:48 AM  
We lost interest in the space program when we didn't have Ruskies to beat anymore. We showed that in the way we funded the program.

img.fark.net
 
2014-08-31 08:38:12 AM  

The_Philosopher_King: We lost interest in the space program when we didn't have Ruskies to beat anymore. We showed that in the way we funded the program.

[img.fark.net image 776x866]




Part of it.
The way politicians secured votes was changing. You no longer had to win wars (actually, losing wars is good if they were part of your opponents platform) or build great monuments. Scientific achievement was nice, but not something you would campaign on. Keeping foreign policy promises didn't matter, since no one was paying attention. A lot of NASA money disappeared into social programs and bad military contracts.

Winning is about playing to specific interest groups. A handout here, a tax dodge there, in exchange for shady legislation you could get all the money and support you need to run.
It's why I don't think they actually want a space program. They want the contract for a white elephant so they can launder that money out of the system, but not the risks that come with achievement.
They treat it just like they do military equipment. Buy a whole bunch of horribly expensive weapons that they'll never use.

Our leaders are no longer held accountable for their failings. So We're stuck in the the eighties, with smaller cell phones.
 
2014-08-31 10:34:52 AM  
It's happening...just have to wait for the next fleet.
Thank you for your patience. Sorry for the inconvenience.

NASA's Space Launch System is officially all systems go for Mars and Moon landings

New space race: 3 companies vie to build space shuttle successor
 
2014-08-31 11:01:04 AM  
Let's put it this way: Four decades ago we (the US) could successfully send a team to the moon and return them safely. Today, we not only can't do what we did four decades ago, we can't even send someone into LEO (space station) without help from the Russians. As for 'there are plans for the next big thing' goes, there have been 'plans' for the last 10 years or more and, so far, it's all been vaporware. Hell, we even got Duke Nukem Forever on the shelves while this 'next new big thing' is still all just talk.

The way things are going the only way we are seriously going to go back into space is if the Pentagon decides that Space Marines on orbiting Space Platforms are the next big thing
 
2014-08-31 11:36:53 AM  

AngryDragon: Occam's Disposable Razor: That first picture you posted is like the Mona Lisa to me. I could stare at it for hours at a time just thinking and contemplating. That's art. That's beauty. That's what we're here for. A couple of guys put on some bulky suits and strapped themselves to a pillar of explosives that guided them straight to the god damn moon with less computing power than you carry in your pocket. That is a triumph, that tops damn near everything else we've managed to pull off. Love that picture

Indeed.  This is the very essence of human achievement.  It's amazing that the generation that was raised with this as their high water mark never strived to go beyond it.


Sorry, but I can't help but view this as a woefully ignorant comment. In the time since, we've expanded our communication beyond all previous comprehension. Technology is growing so fast and so tiny that we've integrated it into almost every facet of our daily lives. We can perform medical operations to solve issues that just several decades ago would have doomed people (I myself am currently not blind because of such advances, 10 years earlier I would have had no chance). Our achievements are not based solely upon our ability to lift people out of gravity's bounds, nor is our current budget situation for such an endeavour indicative of the entire future of such a concept.
 
2014-08-31 11:59:05 AM  

wyltoknow: AngryDragon: Occam's Disposable Razor: That first picture you posted is like the Mona Lisa to me. I could stare at it for hours at a time just thinking and contemplating. That's art. That's beauty. That's what we're here for. A couple of guys put on some bulky suits and strapped themselves to a pillar of explosives that guided them straight to the god damn moon with less computing power than you carry in your pocket. That is a triumph, that tops damn near everything else we've managed to pull off. Love that picture

Indeed.  This is the very essence of human achievement.  It's amazing that the generation that was raised with this as their high water mark never strived to go beyond it.

Sorry, but I can't help but view this as a woefully ignorant comment. In the time since, we've expanded our communication beyond all previous comprehension. Technology is growing so fast and so tiny that we've integrated it into almost every facet of our daily lives. We can perform medical operations to solve issues that just several decades ago would have doomed people (I myself am currently not blind because of such advances, 10 years earlier I would have had no chance). Our achievements are not based solely upon our ability to lift people out of gravity's bounds, nor is our current budget situation for such an endeavour indicative of the entire future of such a concept.


Anti VEGF injections for macular denegeration? Can't think of anything else that fits that time frame that would cure or prevent blindness.

I love advances like that too, biotech is rapidly becoming incredible. I have a friend who takes a daily pill that has basically cured his leukemia - a subtype that was universally a death sentence a just decade ago. Those things are just as inspiring, but they're much harder to convey in a single photo is all.
 
2014-08-31 12:17:18 PM  

wyltoknow: Our achievements are not based solely upon our ability to lift people out of gravity's bounds, nor is our current budget situation for such an endeavour indicative of the entire future of such a concept.


img.fark.net

In the end the ability to go new places is all that will matter among our achievements.
Maybe we find new drugs or invent new toys, but that'll only affect a tiny portion of the population on this blue smudge.

Expanding the domain of the species gets us past bigger problems, like scarcity.
What's good for the future of mankind is finding a way to roll back the frontier without always having to exploit other nations.

Apollo, despite being funded by self serving politicians, represented a higher ideal.
One that has yet to be matched.
 
2014-08-31 12:29:00 PM  

Nem Wan: Tobin_Lam: bearded clamorer: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: Funny - According to my memory, and Wikipedia, the first Shuttle flight occurred on April 12, 1981. And that was a manned flight. The shuttle never went up unmanned.

RTFA
I really don't see the point of the article. So what if the Discovery launched for the first time 30 years ago? It wasn't the first shuttle, the second shuttle, or even the last shuttle.

It's the first space-flown shuttle that ended up in one piece.


So? Columbia went to space first.
 
2014-08-31 12:45:08 PM  

Tobin_Lam: bearded clamorer: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: Funny - According to my memory, and Wikipedia, the first Shuttle flight occurred on April 12, 1981. And that was a manned flight. The shuttle never went up unmanned.

RTFA
I really don't see the point of the article. So what if the Discovery launched for the first time 30 years ago? It wasn't the first shuttle, the second shuttle, or even the last shuttle.


It's a nice little article that Subby made too big a deal of by writing a headline that is misleading at best-- in two ways, at least.
 
2014-08-31 01:54:18 PM  

wyltoknow: Sorry, but I can't help but view this as a woefully ignorant comment. In the time since, we've expanded our communication beyond all previous comprehension. Technology is growing so fast and so tiny that we've integrated it into almost every facet of our daily lives. We can perform medical operations to solve issues that just several decades ago would have doomed people (I myself am currently not blind because of such advances, 10 years earlier I would have had no chance). Our achievements are not based solely upon our ability to lift people out of gravity's bounds, nor is our current budget situation for such an endeavour indicative of the entire future of such a concept


I'm sorry, I wasn't aware this was discussing something other than space travel.  Given that context, name one other area of human technological advancement that has virtually stagnated over the last 30 years.  Anything.
 
2014-08-31 02:55:48 PM  
*floats mystically past, humming quietly*
 
2014-08-31 08:38:49 PM  
And people used to want to pay taxes to do things and fix stuff too.
 
2014-09-01 01:23:50 AM  
The shuttle all but ended NASA.

We are in a rebuilding decade.
 
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