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(Fox News)   Get a spine already. Here, I printed one for you   (foxnews.com) divider line 28
    More: Interesting, Qin Minglin, vertebrae, printmakings, sports practices, St. Jude, soft tissues, cancer patients  
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1775 clicks; posted to Geek » on 28 Aug 2014 at 11:21 PM (47 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



28 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-08-28 08:37:08 PM  
Next up, Orange Crush.
 
2014-08-28 09:08:14 PM  
Pretty soon this will be a hip procedure.
 
2014-08-28 09:19:39 PM  
But can they enhance my tiny coccyx?
 
2014-08-28 10:22:43 PM  
Get a spine moran
 
2014-08-28 11:38:54 PM  
i291.photobucket.com
 
2014-08-28 11:42:11 PM  
Hmmmm, Now who was it that railed against this technology to the heavens and beyond?

/slashies good
 
2014-08-28 11:49:45 PM  
3.bp.blogspot.com
Soon, Sir-smoke-a-lot. Soon.
 
2014-08-29 12:06:51 AM  

Thanks for the Meme-ries: [i291.photobucket.com image 300x238]


I'll get the lights.
 
2014-08-29 12:07:46 AM  

JonBuck: Thanks for the Meme-ries: [i291.photobucket.com image 300x238]

I'll get the lights.


All four of them?
 
2014-08-29 12:12:10 AM  
Ever since that case where they replaced an old woman's jaw with a titanium 3d printed one, I've wondered if you couldn't do something like this for things like replacing the smallest bones in your fingers, maybe even with some sort of haptic device built into each replacement "bone". One main problem would be figuring out mechanisms that could provide the feedback AND allow the posessor to be around strong magnetic fields. Maybe graphene supercapacitors and something to harvest bioelectricity.
 
2014-08-29 12:12:32 AM  
OK, I'm curious if we have any farkers hands-on familiar with this tech hanging out tonight...

I get to(At some point) go play with the 3D printer at the University where my wife works. That is, if the a-holes who use it can bother to not break it yet again before I get around to it. I also get to go play with the scanning electron Microscope as well, but that's a different kettle of fish.

Anywho, I've been trying to figure out what to print, and an actual practical item I need is a mounting plate for a tripod I acquired a few years back, without the plate. Looking online, I am not the only person who needs one of these, and nobody has found one, so I figured I could print one, since for best results, I want something rather precise in its measurements.

I'm just curious how strong the basic resin material is. I know it's more or less like having the piece made out of plastic, but we often write off plastic as cheap, even though it's rather strong stuff. My wife keeps forgetting to ask the lady who actually does the products on the printer, so I figured I'd ask here. Am I getting something strength-wise that would be close to aluminum or something? If it turns out not to be good enough to do this, getting my stepson to mill down a piece in his welding class would be my next option.
 
2014-08-29 12:36:18 AM  

Mikey1969: OK, I'm curious if we have any farkers hands-on familiar with this tech hanging out tonight...

I get to(At some point) go play with the 3D printer at the University where my wife works. That is, if the a-holes who use it can bother to not break it yet again before I get around to it. I also get to go play with the scanning electron Microscope as well, but that's a different kettle of fish.

Anywho, I've been trying to figure out what to print, and an actual practical item I need is a mounting plate for a tripod I acquired a few years back, without the plate. Looking online, I am not the only person who needs one of these, and nobody has found one, so I figured I could print one, since for best results, I want something rather precise in its measurements.

I'm just curious how strong the basic resin material is. I know it's more or less like having the piece made out of plastic, but we often write off plastic as cheap, even though it's rather strong stuff. My wife keeps forgetting to ask the lady who actually does the products on the printer, so I figured I'd ask here. Am I getting something strength-wise that would be close to aluminum or something? If it turns out not to be good enough to do this, getting my stepson to mill down a piece in his welding class would be my next option.


I'm no expert but I really think that depends on the printer. NASA 3D prints some things, and I could 3D print some things, but the quality would obviously be no where near the same. Even if using the same material the strength could depend on how the printer functions maybe.
 
2014-08-29 01:17:22 AM  

picturescrazy: Mikey1969: OK, I'm curious if we have any farkers hands-on familiar with this tech hanging out tonight...

I get to(At some point) go play with the 3D printer at the University where my wife works. That is, if the a-holes who use it can bother to not break it yet again before I get around to it. I also get to go play with the scanning electron Microscope as well, but that's a different kettle of fish.

Anywho, I've been trying to figure out what to print, and an actual practical item I need is a mounting plate for a tripod I acquired a few years back, without the plate. Looking online, I am not the only person who needs one of these, and nobody has found one, so I figured I could print one, since for best results, I want something rather precise in its measurements.

I'm just curious how strong the basic resin material is. I know it's more or less like having the piece made out of plastic, but we often write off plastic as cheap, even though it's rather strong stuff. My wife keeps forgetting to ask the lady who actually does the products on the printer, so I figured I'd ask here. Am I getting something strength-wise that would be close to aluminum or something? If it turns out not to be good enough to do this, getting my stepson to mill down a piece in his welding class would be my next option.

I'm no expert but I really think that depends on the printer. NASA 3D prints some things, and I could 3D print some things, but the quality would obviously be no where near the same. Even if using the same material the strength could depend on how the printer functions maybe.


I'm basically hoping for strong, light and hard (not easily dinged and chipped). Been toying with the idea of setting up a company to do this very thing if it works. It's an easy part to lose, but makes all the difference for serious photogs.
 
2014-08-29 02:28:39 AM  

Mikey1969: I'm basically hoping for strong, light and hard (not easily dinged and chipped). Been toying with the idea of setting up a company to do this very thing if it works. It's an easy part to lose, but makes all the difference for serious photogs.


You are going to need to ask what type of resin their printer uses and/or they have on hand.  There are several different types of plastics, as well as ceramic and other substances that might be available.

Take a look at shapeways to get an idea of the different materials available and their pros/cons.
http://www.shapeways.com/materials
 
2014-08-29 03:04:55 AM  
geekshotphoto.com

Approves.
 
2014-08-29 03:09:33 AM  
PC LOAD LETTER
 
2014-08-29 03:59:29 AM  

Angela Lansbury's Merkin: Mikey1969: I'm basically hoping for strong, light and hard (not easily dinged and chipped). Been toying with the idea of setting up a company to do this very thing if it works. It's an easy part to lose, but makes all the difference for serious photogs.

You are going to need to ask what type of resin their printer uses and/or they have on hand.  There are several different types of plastics, as well as ceramic and other substances that might be available.

Take a look at shapeways to get an idea of the different materials available and their pros/cons.
http://www.shapeways.com/materials


If you don't remember or missed this from a few years ago:  http://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-repair-a-Bugaboo-Pram-with-3D- P rinting/.

This guy recommends stainless steel over ABS for the part he's replacing. You can't put a price tag on your baby's safety. But you can put one on a camera crashing to the ground. And I'm quite sure it would be higher than the extra cost of using steel (if that's an option at all). I don't think I've ever seen a decent tripod with a plastic plate.
 
2014-08-29 04:58:05 AM  

Thanks for the Meme-ries: JonBuck: Thanks for the Meme-ries: [i291.photobucket.com image 300x238]

I'll get the lights.

All four of them?


.You magnificent Farker you
 
2014-08-29 05:14:02 AM  

Argonreality: Ever since that case where they replaced an old woman's jaw with a titanium 3d printed one, I've wondered if you couldn't do something like this for things like replacing the smallest bones in your fingers, maybe even with some sort of haptic device built into each replacement "bone". One main problem would be figuring out mechanisms that could provide the feedback AND allow the posessor to be around strong magnetic fields. Maybe graphene supercapacitors and something to harvest bioelectricity.


You're getting too inventive. I expect a near generation of printed bone fingers and cellular matrix flooded with stem cells to heal amputees. Nothing exotic, just hijacking the healing process to cure problems with natural results.

My father had two fingers sliced off in a machine shop accident in 90. He was fortunate to be near an advanced hospital where surgeons reattached them down to the blood vessels. It took a few years, but he regained most of the dexterity in his fingers as the nerves regrew.
 
2014-08-29 06:19:24 AM  
Give one to the Democrats.
 
2014-08-29 07:05:42 AM  
Of course there was was no way to make anything before additive manufacturing became conflated with junky hobbyist '3d printing'
 
2014-08-29 07:42:44 AM  

Mikey1969: Been toying with the idea of setting up a company to do this very thing if it works.


There are companies which will print things for you, in various materials including ones with metal.
 
2014-08-29 08:16:38 AM  
I don't know why we need to print spines when they've been available in bottles for hundreds of years.
 
2014-08-29 08:50:30 AM  

Thanks for the Meme-ries: JonBuck: Thanks for the Meme-ries: [i291.photobucket.com image 300x238]

I'll get the lights.

All four of them?


There are five lights.
 
2014-08-29 09:33:58 AM  
Yeah, it's all well and good until he gets one of these

images.macworld.com
 
2014-08-29 10:06:28 AM  
3D printing can have applications for improving health? Perhaps extending the lifespan of injured people? The devil you say!
 
2014-08-29 10:11:58 AM  
wildcardjack: You're getting too inventive. I expect a near generation of printed bone fingers and cellular matrix flooded with stem cells to heal amputees. Nothing exotic, just hijacking the healing process to cure problems with natural results.

My father had two fingers sliced off in a machine shop accident in 90. He was fortunate to be near an advanced hospital where surgeons reattached them down to the blood vessels. It took a few years, but he regained most of the dexterity in his fingers as the nerves regrew.


First off, glad your dad didn't end up permanently losing those fingers. That would suck immensely. Second, I get what you're saying, and that would probably be a good stepping stone to what I was talking about, but I was imagining it more as a surgical enhancement of the body instead of a repair to incurred damage (borrowing a bit from Mass Effect lore where some of the techs aboard various ships like the Normandy got haptic implants so they didn't need gloves to get feedback from the light console thingies and omni tools).
 
2014-08-29 11:00:53 AM  

JonBuck: Thanks for the Meme-ries: [i291.photobucket.com image 300x238]

I'll get the lights.


Allow me.

img.fark.net
 
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