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(Some Guy)   Arkansas pizzeria under fire after "church bulletin discount" stokes religious fires and raises important issues like where they hell can you find edible pizza in Arkansas?   (christiantimes.com) divider line 298
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5508 clicks; posted to Main » on 28 Aug 2014 at 3:13 PM (43 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-08-28 11:37:17 AM  
Seeing as this is a Christian State and all, I guess the pizza owners don't have a problem with Christians paying the non-Muslim tax in areas dominated by Islam.  After all, believe-as-I-do-or-pay-more is a well-established norm in the monotheistic world.
 
2014-08-28 11:38:17 AM  
Print out an online bulletin,
receive discount.
 
2014-08-28 11:42:33 AM  
I'm an atheist and I'm still trying to figure out the issue here. This has nothing to do with government involvement in religion. It's a private business doing something they think is good to do. Hell, if I wanted the discount I'd stop by some church after service and grab a bulletin so I could get the discount too. There's no religious test and they're not denying service to anyone.

Maybe it's just I'm not a dick.

Either way, if someone has a take on this for why the FFRF (who I usually support) is bringing suit, I'd love to hear it.
 
2014-08-28 11:43:45 AM  
Why are the militant atheists pissed about this?  It's as if they have zero regard for private individuals to practice the first amendment.
 
2014-08-28 11:50:10 AM  
Isn't this story months old?

/or is this a different bunch of twits?
 
2014-08-28 12:00:31 PM  

SurfaceTension: I'm an atheist and I'm still trying to figure out the issue here. This has nothing to do with government involvement in religion. It's a private business doing something they think is good to do. Hell, if I wanted the discount I'd stop by some church after service and grab a bulletin so I could get the discount too. There's no religious test and they're not denying service to anyone.

Maybe it's just I'm not a dick.

Either way, if someone has a take on this for why the FFRF (who I usually support) is bringing suit, I'd love to hear it.


Religion (and lack there of) is a protect class just as race is. Imagine going to a place that said "You get a discount for being white-just bring proof that you are recently white".  This is all based on the Federal Civil Rights Act which guarantees all people the right to "full and equal enjoyment of the goods, services, facilities, privileges, advantages, and accommodations of any place of public accommodation, without discrimination or segregation on the ground of race, color, religion, or national origin."
 
2014-08-28 12:07:41 PM  
While it isn't a huge thing, the FFRF does have a point- giving a discount to one group by definition means you are discriminating against those not in that group. And while most people don't care if the group you are favoring is secular (US military, boy  or girl scouts, pregnant moms, whatever) once you cross the line to religion people get a little antsy.

That said, for my part all I got is 'Meh', it's Arkansas pizza- I wouldn't walk across the street for it.
 
2014-08-28 12:09:49 PM  
http://www.yelp.com/biz/ozark-cafe-jasper

Boom.  Passable pizza in Arkansas.
 
2014-08-28 12:12:27 PM  
Where they hell?

Is hell a verb now?

I guess if Arkansas is pizza hell
 
2014-08-28 12:24:56 PM  

stpauler: SurfaceTension: I'm an atheist and I'm still trying to figure out the issue here. This has nothing to do with government involvement in religion. It's a private business doing something they think is good to do. Hell, if I wanted the discount I'd stop by some church after service and grab a bulletin so I could get the discount too. There's no religious test and they're not denying service to anyone.

Maybe it's just I'm not a dick.

Either way, if someone has a take on this for why the FFRF (who I usually support) is bringing suit, I'd love to hear it.

Religion (and lack there of) is a protect class just as race is. Imagine going to a place that said "You get a discount for being white-just bring proof that you are recently white".  This is all based on the Federal Civil Rights Act which guarantees all people the right to "full and equal enjoyment of the goods, services, facilities, privileges, advantages, and accommodations of any place of public accommodation, without discrimination or segregation on the ground of race, color, religion, or national origin."


Businesses give discounts based on some affinity all the time- ticket holders from some sports team, social group or for active duty military or vets etc. and that isn't a civil rights matter.  If the business started to pick and choose which church's bulletin qualified you for the discount, I would agree with you that it becomes a civil rights matter of equal accommodation at that point.

I'm not comfortable with the atheism is a religion argument either, since it's so often used as a sword by religious activists to claim that secular public school education etc is a forbidden establishment of religion, when it is more accurately a refusal to engage in a government establishment of religion.  Atheism is a viewpoint on religion, but not a religion, IMHO, akin to equating a null set with all other sets since they are both "sets."
 
2014-08-28 12:25:48 PM  

stpauler: SurfaceTension: I'm an atheist and I'm still trying to figure out the issue here. This has nothing to do with government involvement in religion. It's a private business doing something they think is good to do. Hell, if I wanted the discount I'd stop by some church after service and grab a bulletin so I could get the discount too. There's no religious test and they're not denying service to anyone.

Maybe it's just I'm not a dick.

Either way, if someone has a take on this for why the FFRF (who I usually support) is bringing suit, I'd love to hear it.

Religion (and lack there of) is a protect class just as race is. Imagine going to a place that said "You get a discount for being white-just bring proof that you are recently white".  This is all based on the Federal Civil Rights Act which guarantees all people the right to "full and equal enjoyment of the goods, services, facilities, privileges, advantages, and accommodations of any place of public accommodation, without discrimination or segregation on the ground of race, color, religion, or national origin."


Ah, got it. For some reason I was thinking the act didn't apply to religion.
 
2014-08-28 12:32:23 PM  
FTFA: The Freedom From Religion Foundation has taken issu

That's where I stopped reading. I've seen the work this foundation does with my own eyes. Taking on a county government for putting up a big ol' Jesus on the courthouse lawn is one thing. Hitting a pizza place for offering a discount is another thing, altogether.

Seriously, can we all just stop being assholes? No?

*sigh*

Carry on, then ...
 
2014-08-28 12:38:52 PM  
Lots of people go to church on Sunday and then go looking for a place to eat after church.  This is just an attempt to attract those people to this here pizza parlor.  Nothing wrong with that.
 
2014-08-28 12:50:33 PM  

stpauler: SurfaceTension: I'm an atheist and I'm still trying to figure out the issue here. This has nothing to do with government involvement in religion. It's a private business doing something they think is good to do. Hell, if I wanted the discount I'd stop by some church after service and grab a bulletin so I could get the discount too. There's no religious test and they're not denying service to anyone.

Maybe it's just I'm not a dick.

Either way, if someone has a take on this for why the FFRF (who I usually support) is bringing suit, I'd love to hear it.

Religion (and lack there of) is a protect class just as race is. Imagine going to a place that said "You get a discount for being white-just bring proof that you are recently white".  This is all based on the Federal Civil Rights Act which guarantees all people the right to "full and equal enjoyment of the goods, services, facilities, privileges, advantages, and accommodations of any place of public accommodation, without discrimination or segregation on the ground of race, color, religion, or national origin."


What's to stop an atheist from stopping by a church for 3 seconds to pick up a bulletin, or printing one out online or whatever?
 
2014-08-28 12:52:59 PM  

stpauler: . Imagine going to a place that said "You get a discount for being white-just bring proof that you are recently white".


I'd walk in and say, "I know you think I'm black, but my name is Kevin".
(This officially makes me white)
 
2014-08-28 12:55:28 PM  

grumpfuff: What's to stop an atheist from stopping by a church for 3 seconds to pick up a bulletin, or printing one out online or whatever?


Nothing.

I could see a problem if say, someone wearing a Yarmukle used the coupon and was told they couldn't because it was a Christian coupon, or if they said "I know you don't believe in Jesus, so no coupon for you" but that does not appear to be the case.
 
2014-08-28 12:55:44 PM  

grumpfuff: stpauler: SurfaceTension: I'm an atheist and I'm still trying to figure out the issue here. This has nothing to do with government involvement in religion. It's a private business doing something they think is good to do. Hell, if I wanted the discount I'd stop by some church after service and grab a bulletin so I could get the discount too. There's no religious test and they're not denying service to anyone.

Maybe it's just I'm not a dick.

Either way, if someone has a take on this for why the FFRF (who I usually support) is bringing suit, I'd love to hear it.

Religion (and lack there of) is a protect class just as race is. Imagine going to a place that said "You get a discount for being white-just bring proof that you are recently white".  This is all based on the Federal Civil Rights Act which guarantees all people the right to "full and equal enjoyment of the goods, services, facilities, privileges, advantages, and accommodations of any place of public accommodation, without discrimination or segregation on the ground of race, color, religion, or national origin."

What's to stop an atheist from stopping by a church for 3 seconds to pick up a bulletin, or printing one out online or whatever?


Everyone knows that when an atheist steps foot in a church, the Power of Jesus sends him/her immediately to Hell to suffer  Eternal Torment by Fire and Brimstone.

Yes, even mosques, synagogues and other types of temples. Haven't you heard? Jesus is EVERYWHERE!
 
2014-08-28 01:01:19 PM  

grumpfuff: stpauler: SurfaceTension: I'm an atheist and I'm still trying to figure out the issue here. This has nothing to do with government involvement in religion. It's a private business doing something they think is good to do. Hell, if I wanted the discount I'd stop by some church after service and grab a bulletin so I could get the discount too. There's no religious test and they're not denying service to anyone.

Maybe it's just I'm not a dick.

Either way, if someone has a take on this for why the FFRF (who I usually support) is bringing suit, I'd love to hear it.

Religion (and lack there of) is a protect class just as race is. Imagine going to a place that said "You get a discount for being white-just bring proof that you are recently white".  This is all based on the Federal Civil Rights Act which guarantees all people the right to "full and equal enjoyment of the goods, services, facilities, privileges, advantages, and accommodations of any place of public accommodation, without discrimination or segregation on the ground of race, color, religion, or national origin."

What's to stop an atheist from stopping by a church for 3 seconds to pick up a bulletin, or printing one out online or whatever?


Why should an atheist be required to self identify as a member of a group to which they do not wish to belong in order to obtain an equal discount to a member of that group?  Again, if this were veterans or students or some other non-protected class, no one would bat an eye.  Religion or lack thereof is protected from discrimination in the public sphere.

And, for Slim Noggin, if the goal is to capture the post church lunch crowd, then they could simply offer a 10% discount during lunch time on Sundays.  That way, anyone can take advantage of the discount, not just specific groups.
 
2014-08-28 01:06:51 PM  

Stile4aly: grumpfuff: stpauler: SurfaceTension: I'm an atheist and I'm still trying to figure out the issue here. This has nothing to do with government involvement in religion. It's a private business doing something they think is good to do. Hell, if I wanted the discount I'd stop by some church after service and grab a bulletin so I could get the discount too. There's no religious test and they're not denying service to anyone.

Maybe it's just I'm not a dick.

Either way, if someone has a take on this for why the FFRF (who I usually support) is bringing suit, I'd love to hear it.

Religion (and lack there of) is a protect class just as race is. Imagine going to a place that said "You get a discount for being white-just bring proof that you are recently white".  This is all based on the Federal Civil Rights Act which guarantees all people the right to "full and equal enjoyment of the goods, services, facilities, privileges, advantages, and accommodations of any place of public accommodation, without discrimination or segregation on the ground of race, color, religion, or national origin."

What's to stop an atheist from stopping by a church for 3 seconds to pick up a bulletin, or printing one out online or whatever?

Why should an atheist be required to self identify as a member of a group to which they do not wish to belong in order to obtain an equal discount to a member of that group?  Again, if this were veterans or students or some other non-protected class, no one would bat an eye.  Religion or lack thereof is protected from discrimination in the public sphere.

And, for Slim Noggin, if the goal is to capture the post church lunch crowd, then they could simply offer a 10% discount during lunch time on Sundays.  That way, anyone can take advantage of the discount, not just specific groups.


See stan unusual's post. Companies offer selective discounts all the time, like with sports tickets. I never cared about those, so I have a hard time comparing about this.

And to call this discrimination is laughable. Seriously? You're not going to get a $1 discount or whatever, because you're too lazy to stop by for a second to grab a bulletin. Hey, one of the food places in my town charges more for delivery to other towns. We should sue them for discrimination too!
 
2014-08-28 01:08:01 PM  
Similar case

A settlement has been reached in a discrimination complaint brought by an atheist against Prudhomme's Lost Cajun Kitchen in Columbia, Lancaster County.

The one-sentence settlement from the Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission reads: "Respondent will continue to give a discount for any bulletin from any group oriented around the subject of religious faith, including publications from the Freedom From Religion Foundation, as long as they maintain the Sunday discount program."
 
2014-08-28 01:13:00 PM  

SauronWasFramed: Why are the militant atheists pissed about this?  It's as if they have zero regard for private individuals to practice the first amendment.


Religious discrimination is against the law.
 
2014-08-28 01:15:11 PM  

grumpfuff: Stile4aly: grumpfuff: stpauler: SurfaceTension: I'm an atheist and I'm still trying to figure out the issue here. This has nothing to do with government involvement in religion. It's a private business doing something they think is good to do. Hell, if I wanted the discount I'd stop by some church after service and grab a bulletin so I could get the discount too. There's no religious test and they're not denying service to anyone.

Maybe it's just I'm not a dick.

Either way, if someone has a take on this for why the FFRF (who I usually support) is bringing suit, I'd love to hear it.

Religion (and lack there of) is a protect class just as race is. Imagine going to a place that said "You get a discount for being white-just bring proof that you are recently white".  This is all based on the Federal Civil Rights Act which guarantees all people the right to "full and equal enjoyment of the goods, services, facilities, privileges, advantages, and accommodations of any place of public accommodation, without discrimination or segregation on the ground of race, color, religion, or national origin."

What's to stop an atheist from stopping by a church for 3 seconds to pick up a bulletin, or printing one out online or whatever?

Why should an atheist be required to self identify as a member of a group to which they do not wish to belong in order to obtain an equal discount to a member of that group?  Again, if this were veterans or students or some other non-protected class, no one would bat an eye.  Religion or lack thereof is protected from discrimination in the public sphere.

And, for Slim Noggin, if the goal is to capture the post church lunch crowd, then they could simply offer a 10% discount during lunch time on Sundays.  That way, anyone can take advantage of the discount, not just specific groups.

See stan unusual's post. Companies offer selective discounts all the time, like with sports tickets. I never cared about those, so I have a hard time comparing about this ...


Yes, it's discrimination - it's preferential treatment to a certain group and exclusion of another group based on a protected criteria.  If this was a discount for only non-disabled people, or Asians, or Democrats then maybe that would better illustrate the point.  The post below yours mentions a similar case where the defendent agreed to accept fliers from an atheist organization as qualifying for the discount, which would eliminate the discrimination.
 
2014-08-28 01:20:01 PM  

Stile4aly: grumpfuff: Stile4aly: grumpfuff: stpauler: SurfaceTension: I'm an atheist and I'm still trying to figure out the issue here. This has nothing to do with government involvement in religion. It's a private business doing something they think is good to do. Hell, if I wanted the discount I'd stop by some church after service and grab a bulletin so I could get the discount too. There's no religious test and they're not denying service to anyone.

Maybe it's just I'm not a dick.

Either way, if someone has a take on this for why the FFRF (who I usually support) is bringing suit, I'd love to hear it.

Religion (and lack there of) is a protect class just as race is. Imagine going to a place that said "You get a discount for being white-just bring proof that you are recently white".  This is all based on the Federal Civil Rights Act which guarantees all people the right to "full and equal enjoyment of the goods, services, facilities, privileges, advantages, and accommodations of any place of public accommodation, without discrimination or segregation on the ground of race, color, religion, or national origin."

What's to stop an atheist from stopping by a church for 3 seconds to pick up a bulletin, or printing one out online or whatever?

Why should an atheist be required to self identify as a member of a group to which they do not wish to belong in order to obtain an equal discount to a member of that group?  Again, if this were veterans or students or some other non-protected class, no one would bat an eye.  Religion or lack thereof is protected from discrimination in the public sphere.

And, for Slim Noggin, if the goal is to capture the post church lunch crowd, then they could simply offer a 10% discount during lunch time on Sundays.  That way, anyone can take advantage of the discount, not just specific groups.

See stan unusual's post. Companies offer selective discounts all the time, like with sports tickets. I never cared about those, so I have a hard time comparing ...


Alright, so be consistent. Sue that place in my town that offers cheaper deliveries to residents. Also, sue those restaurants that give discounts to people with tickets from the local sports game. You valiant internet crusader, why are you letting these forms of discrimination go unchecked???

So they expanded the type of fliers or whatever allowed. Woo. All is right in the world now, we can sleep safely.
 
2014-08-28 01:20:30 PM  
Yes, it is discrimination. And I'm all for it. Because I sure as HELL am not trying to eat where are the church folks go with their kids on Sunday after service.
 
2014-08-28 01:23:17 PM  
What about churches that don't print bulletins, HUH?! WHAT ABOUT THEM?!
 
2014-08-28 01:24:11 PM  
grumpfuff: Alright, so be consistent. Sue that place in my town that offers cheaper deliveries to residents. Also, sue those restaurants that give discounts to people with tickets from the local sports game. You valiant internet crusader, why are you letting these forms of discrimination go unchecked???

Are those things protected by the Civil Rights Act that I posted and you even have copied in your post?
 
2014-08-28 01:27:07 PM  

stpauler: grumpfuff: Alright, so be consistent. Sue that place in my town that offers cheaper deliveries to residents. Also, sue those restaurants that give discounts to people with tickets from the local sports game. You valiant internet crusader, why are you letting these forms of discrimination go unchecked???

Are those things protected by the Civil Rights Act that I posted and you even have copied in your post?


Discrimination is discrimination. Campaign for change! Seriously, get out there! If this is a case of discrimination, then those are also examples of discrimination, regardless of what the law says.
 
2014-08-28 01:27:54 PM  

grumpfuff: Stile4aly: grumpfuff: Stile4aly: grumpfuff: stpauler: SurfaceTension: I'm an atheist and I'm still trying to figure out the issue here. This has nothing to do with government involvement in religion. It's a private business doing something they think is good to do. Hell, if I wanted the discount I'd stop by some church after service and grab a bulletin so I could get the discount too. There's no religious test and they're not denying service to anyone.

Maybe it's just I'm not a dick.

Either way, if someone has a take on this for why the FFRF (who I usually support) is bringing suit, I'd love to hear it.

Religion (and lack there of) is a protect class just as race is. Imagine going to a place that said "You get a discount for being white-just bring proof that you are recently white".  This is all based on the Federal Civil Rights Act which guarantees all people the right to "full and equal enjoyment of the goods, services, facilities, privileges, advantages, and accommodations of any place of public accommodation, without discrimination or segregation on the ground of race, color, religion, or national origin."

What's to stop an atheist from stopping by a church for 3 seconds to pick up a bulletin, or printing one out online or whatever?

Why should an atheist be required to self identify as a member of a group to which they do not wish to belong in order to obtain an equal discount to a member of that group?  Again, if this were veterans or students or some other non-protected class, no one would bat an eye.  Religion or lack thereof is protected from discrimination in the public sphere.

And, for Slim Noggin, if the goal is to capture the post church lunch crowd, then they could simply offer a 10% discount during lunch time on Sundays.  That way, anyone can take advantage of the discount, not just specific groups.

See stan unusual's post. Companies offer selective discounts all the time, like with sports tickets. I never cared about those, so I have a hard time comparing ...

Alright, so be consistent. Sue that place in my town that offers cheaper deliveries to residents. Also, sue those restaurants that give discounts to people with tickets from the local sports game. You valiant internet crusader, why are you letting these forms of discrimination go unchecked???

So they expanded the type of fliers or whatever allowed. Woo. All is right in the world now, we can sleep safely.


Sports fan isn't a protected class
 
2014-08-28 01:28:42 PM  

grumpfuff: stpauler: grumpfuff: Alright, so be consistent. Sue that place in my town that offers cheaper deliveries to residents. Also, sue those restaurants that give discounts to people with tickets from the local sports game. You valiant internet crusader, why are you letting these forms of discrimination go unchecked???

Are those things protected by the Civil Rights Act that I posted and you even have copied in your post?

Discrimination is discrimination. Campaign for change! Seriously, get out there! If this is a case of discrimination, then those are also examples of discrimination, regardless of what the law says.


No, it isn't. Much as you'd like it to be.
 
2014-08-28 01:30:16 PM  
Boy, the fish fry is going to be really awkward now.
 
2014-08-28 01:30:35 PM  

cameroncrazy1984: grumpfuff: Stile4aly: grumpfuff: Stile4aly: grumpfuff: stpauler: SurfaceTension: I'm an atheist and I'm still trying to figure out the issue here. This has nothing to do with government involvement in religion. It's a private business doing something they think is good to do. Hell, if I wanted the discount I'd stop by some church after service and grab a bulletin so I could get the discount too. There's no religious test and they're not denying service to anyone.

Maybe it's just I'm not a dick.

Either way, if someone has a take on this for why the FFRF (who I usually support) is bringing suit, I'd love to hear it.

Religion (and lack there of) is a protect class just as race is. Imagine going to a place that said "You get a discount for being white-just bring proof that you are recently white".  This is all based on the Federal Civil Rights Act which guarantees all people the right to "full and equal enjoyment of the goods, services, facilities, privileges, advantages, and accommodations of any place of public accommodation, without discrimination or segregation on the ground of race, color, religion, or national origin."

What's to stop an atheist from stopping by a church for 3 seconds to pick up a bulletin, or printing one out online or whatever?

Why should an atheist be required to self identify as a member of a group to which they do not wish to belong in order to obtain an equal discount to a member of that group?  Again, if this were veterans or students or some other non-protected class, no one would bat an eye.  Religion or lack thereof is protected from discrimination in the public sphere.

And, for Slim Noggin, if the goal is to capture the post church lunch crowd, then they could simply offer a 10% discount during lunch time on Sundays.  That way, anyone can take advantage of the discount, not just specific groups.

See stan unusual's post. Companies offer selective discounts all the time, like with sports tickets. I never cared about those, so I have ...


Again, what is to stop an atheist from grabbing a bulletin, or having his Christian friend pick up a few for him? If the restaurant made you get on your knees and say a Hail Mary, I'd be right there with the rest of you. If it was a "proof of service attendance" thing signed by a pastor/priest/etc? Absolutely a problem. But having a piece of paper that is easily available and free to all? Having a hard time caring about that.
 
2014-08-28 01:31:51 PM  

cameroncrazy1984: grumpfuff: stpauler: grumpfuff: Alright, so be consistent. Sue that place in my town that offers cheaper deliveries to residents. Also, sue those restaurants that give discounts to people with tickets from the local sports game. You valiant internet crusader, why are you letting these forms of discrimination go unchecked???

Are those things protected by the Civil Rights Act that I posted and you even have copied in your post?

Discrimination is discrimination. Campaign for change! Seriously, get out there! If this is a case of discrimination, then those are also examples of discrimination, regardless of what the law says.

No, it isn't. Much as you'd like it to be.


So then, it's not discrimination to not hire someone because they are gay, because sexuality is not protected in all states.

And like it to be? I'm laughing at this entire thing. Oh please, tell me why I'd like it to be discrimination.
 
2014-08-28 01:32:05 PM  
Or you could, you know, not go to the restaurant ...
 
2014-08-28 01:32:41 PM  
This case may be a bridge too far for those who want the Religious protection from/of to apply to every freaking thing.  Next you know you can't advertise that you are  a church because, omg what if athiests want to visit and they might feel awkward what with that religious ceremony going on.
 
2014-08-28 01:33:54 PM  

grumpfuff: stpauler: grumpfuff: Alright, so be consistent. Sue that place in my town that offers cheaper deliveries to residents. Also, sue those restaurants that give discounts to people with tickets from the local sports game. You valiant internet crusader, why are you letting these forms of discrimination go unchecked???

Are those things protected by the Civil Rights Act that I posted and you even have copied in your post?

Discrimination is discrimination. Campaign for change! Seriously, get out there! If this is a case of discrimination, then those are also examples of discrimination, regardless of what the law says.


Now farkied as: stupid; possibly illiterate
 
2014-08-28 01:35:06 PM  

stpauler: grumpfuff: stpauler: grumpfuff: Alright, so be consistent. Sue that place in my town that offers cheaper deliveries to residents. Also, sue those restaurants that give discounts to people with tickets from the local sports game. You valiant internet crusader, why are you letting these forms of discrimination go unchecked???

Are those things protected by the Civil Rights Act that I posted and you even have copied in your post?

Discrimination is discrimination. Campaign for change! Seriously, get out there! If this is a case of discrimination, then those are also examples of discrimination, regardless of what the law says.

Now farkied as: stupid; possibly illiterate


img0.etsystatic.com
 
2014-08-28 01:35:47 PM  
Wait - I misread. I thought this was a coupon in a bulletin. They want to see an actual bulletin, and claim it's not about religion. Then what is it about?

If they advertised in the bulletin, that would be one thing. But just asking for an actual bulletin, well... that's questionable. Also, if I were in charge of the church, I'd also be asking "why are you using my church/religion to get free publicity for your business?"

If it was a coupon, the bulletin would be no different, to my mind, as advertising only in "Ebony" magazine or "Men's Health." Or hey, "Catholics Monthly". Targeted advertising. But asking for the bulletin sort of seems like flaunting a desire for only the "faithful" in their restaurant and lots of free publicity - which they are currently getting.
 
2014-08-28 01:41:52 PM  
Searcy is ground zero for hardcore fundies, so it just seems like good business to try to attract them after church. Maybe they'll save enough money to actually leave a decent tip.

Also, any good atheist in God Country knows that the worst farking time to go out to eat is right after church on Sunday. Who would want to eat then anyway? Stay home, watch football, and avoid the god people.
 
2014-08-28 01:43:46 PM  

grumpfuff: Again, what is to stop an atheist from grabbing a bulletin, or having his Christian friend pick up a few for him?


Forget it. He's rolling.
 
2014-08-28 01:48:24 PM  

Abzzstain: Also, any good atheist in God Country knows that the worst farking time to go out to eat is right after church on Sunday. Who would want to eat then anyway? Stay home, watch football, and avoid the god people.


That's the rule everywhere, even in "blue states". Don't go near diners or anywhere that families can congregate on Sunday mornings.
 
2014-08-28 01:51:00 PM  
Who the hell gets pizza right after church?

You don't want to get all that grease on your Sunday best.
 
2014-08-28 01:54:38 PM  
Let me clarify. The Christian who doesn't go to the church and get a bulletin is just as ineligible for the discount as the atheist or Muslim or Hindu or whatever who doesn't go to the church and get a bulletin.

On the other hand, the atheist or Muslim or Hindu or whatever who stops by the church and picks up a bulletin is just as eligible for the discount as the Christian who gets one.

Service attendance is not required for the discount, no matter the person. All that matters is they have a piece of paper that churches distribute freely at all times.

Furthermore, if you want to say this is discrimination, then discounts for sports tickets is also discrimination. I'm not talking about within the eyes of the law, protected classes, or anything like that. I'm talking just plain, old discrimination.
 
2014-08-28 01:55:03 PM  

grumpfuff: Alright, so be consistent. Sue that place in my town that offers cheaper deliveries to residents. Also, sue those restaurants that give discounts to people with tickets from the local sports game. You valiant internet crusader, why are you letting these forms of discrimination go unchecked???


you don't seem to be understanding the whole concept of "protected class"

You cannot be discriminated by race, gender, or religion. If you discriminate by one of those protected classes then your ass is on the line.

Do you understand or do I have to talk with potato in my mouth to make the words clear to you?
 
2014-08-28 01:57:13 PM  
coupons are a form of discrimination toward people too lazy to cut out or printout coupons.
 
2014-08-28 01:57:42 PM  
I have no idea why people sue over shiat like this.

Simply grab a massive stack of church bulletins, stand outside the front door, and hand them out to everyone going in.  I'm pretty sure this policy would end pretty quickly if they dump 10 or 15% of their profits.
 
2014-08-28 01:57:50 PM  

somedude210: grumpfuff: Alright, so be consistent. Sue that place in my town that offers cheaper deliveries to residents. Also, sue those restaurants that give discounts to people with tickets from the local sports game. You valiant internet crusader, why are you letting these forms of discrimination go unchecked???

you don't seem to be understanding the whole concept of "protected class"

You cannot be discriminated by race, gender, or religion. If you discriminate by one of those protected classes then your ass is on the line.

Do you understand or do I have to talk with potato in my mouth to make the words clear to you?


Please point out where I said anything about "protected class." I'm not talking protected class, I'm talking discrimination.

In Texas, for example, LGBT is not a protected class, nor is it so at the federal level. Yet I think we would both agree that refusing to hire an LGBT individual is still discrimination.
 
2014-08-28 01:58:02 PM  

grumpfuff: Again, what is to stop an atheist from grabbing a bulletin, or having his Christian friend pick up a few for him? If the restaurant made you get on your knees and say a Hail Mary, I'd be right there with the rest of you. If it was a "proof of service attendance" thing signed by a pastor/priest/etc? Absolutely a problem. But having a piece of paper that is easily available and free to all? Having a hard time caring about that.


because you're still discriminating. Why have someone jump through extra hoops to get the same treatment?

What's to stop a black guy from dressing up as a white guy and powdering his face a bit? He could say he's Italian? I mean how is that discrimination?

/seriously, don't be that idiotic.
 
2014-08-28 01:58:43 PM  

Abzzstain: Maybe they'll save enough money to actually leave a decent tip.


[notsureifserious.jpg]

When I worked at Waffle House in central Arkansas many moons ago, Sunday was terrible.  Chock-a-block morning to evening and maybe a grand total of $10 in tips was left behind.
 
2014-08-28 01:58:45 PM  
i2.photobucket.com
 
2014-08-28 01:58:52 PM  

grumpfuff: Service attendance is not required for the discount, no matter the person. All that matters is they have a piece of paper that churches distribute freely at all times.


Actually, they are usually only available on Sunday, after services.

Though an interesting point: how would the local churches react to a bunch of random people showing up at the end of church and asking for/taking bulletins that they pay to print and distribute to their own parish members? That in itself could be interesting since the churches could ultimately end up being against the discount since it is using their materials to promote a business/obtain a discount.
 
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