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(Chicago Trib)   Pabst mansion sells for $4.8 million, is described as tasteless and only ironically appreciated by hipsters   (chicagotribune.com) divider line 19
    More: Followup, Glencoe, Sheridan Road, Pabst Brewing  
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3903 clicks; posted to Main » on 28 Aug 2014 at 1:16 PM (26 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



19 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-08-28 11:53:24 AM  
...and would have sold for 100x more in China
 
2014-08-28 12:12:34 PM  
PABST BLUE RIBBON IS BEST BEER for baiting slugs.

Seriously, slugs love that crap.
 
2014-08-28 01:22:37 PM  
Man. I'll bet it has a SWEET keg-o-rator in the garage!
 
2014-08-28 01:29:30 PM  
There was a local brewery in Louisville named Oertle's. Oertle's 92 was the brand name of the beer. Almost 50 years ago, Mom rented for a couple of years the old Oertle's mansion. It had been built in the 19th century. Among other amenities, It had a room over the garage for the chauffeur. A greenhouse. And a rathskeller in the basement -- oak panels, brass everywhere. By the time she got to it, it was priced for a single mother taking care of a family on a small salary. My favorite memory of the place is of its attic fan -- my brother and I were exiled to the attic. The fan's blades were around 6 or 7 feet across and it was housed in a large cage for our safety since small objects could be pulled into its vortex, but after a few minutes of operation the entire house was almost comfortable even in the summer.
 
2014-08-28 01:30:14 PM  
The Pabst Brewery used to sell a Pabst Extract tonic for insomnia. So tasteless it put people to sleep.
 
2014-08-28 01:31:49 PM  
It's just as nice at the Budweiser mansion and you're not getting charged for all sports advertising.
 
2014-08-28 01:34:04 PM  
Poor little foster house. I'm betting it has been abused.
 
2014-08-28 01:37:36 PM  
I'm pretty sure my dad helped pay for that mansion. That was all he would drink. Well, that and Olympia beer. ...wonder what ever happened to him. Hmmm...
 
2014-08-28 01:37:44 PM  

yakmans_dad: There was a local brewery in Louisville named Oertle's. Oertle's 92 was the brand name of the beer. Almost 50 years ago, Mom rented for a couple of years the old Oertle's mansion. It had been built in the 19th century. Among other amenities, It had a room over the garage for the chauffeur. A greenhouse. And a rathskeller in the basement -- oak panels, brass everywhere. By the time she got to it, it was priced for a single mother taking care of a family on a small salary. My favorite memory of the place is of its attic fan -- my brother and I were exiled to the attic. The fan's blades were around 6 or 7 feet across and it was housed in a large cage for our safety since small objects could be pulled into its vortex, but after a few minutes of operation the entire house was almost comfortable even in the summer.


My family home was built in 1903, great grandfather was a banker, and it used to have an attic fan, as a kid I would turn it on and the whole house would vibrate, like the sound in Phantasm in the funeral home.

We also have a basement that had a coal burning furnace that would make Freddie Krueger envious.
 
2014-08-28 01:45:36 PM  
theflatline:

We also have a basement that had a coal burning furnace that would make Freddie Krueger envious.

Our first house had a gravity flow furnace that had been converted from coal. Huge firebox and a real spider web of vents. No fan. And the thermostat was powered by a thermocouple.  That came in handy when an ice storm knocked out power in the neighborhood. We were the only ones whose furnace kept going. Ruinously expensive otherwise, though.
 
2014-08-28 01:54:52 PM  

yakmans_dad: theflatline:

We also have a basement that had a coal burning furnace that would make Freddie Krueger envious.

Our first house had a gravity flow furnace that had been converted from coal. Huge firebox and a real spider web of vents. No fan. And the thermostat was powered by a thermocouple.  That came in handy when an ice storm knocked out power in the neighborhood. We were the only ones whose furnace kept going. Ruinously expensive otherwise, though.


My house is in Florida, built by a new architect, which is why we had the coal furnace.

All of my utilities run through my basement, and while there are stairs that go straight down my father built a 150 lb trap door with an iron floor to walk on with a light in the kitchen to let you know someone is in the basement.

Whenever the cable guy or gas guy come they always treat me like I am Dr. Lecter.
 
2014-08-28 02:11:34 PM  

theflatline: yakmans_dad: theflatline:

We also have a basement that had a coal burning furnace that would make Freddie Krueger envious.

Our first house had a gravity flow furnace that had been converted from coal. Huge firebox and a real spider web of vents. No fan. And the thermostat was powered by a thermocouple.  That came in handy when an ice storm knocked out power in the neighborhood. We were the only ones whose furnace kept going. Ruinously expensive otherwise, though.

My house is in Florida, built by a new architect, which is why we had the coal furnace.

All of my utilities run through my basement, and while there are stairs that go straight down my father built a 150 lb trap door with an iron floor to walk on with a light in the kitchen to let you know someone is in the basement.

Whenever the cable guy or gas guy come they always treat me like I am Dr. Lecter.


My house in Chicago was built in 1893. Beautiful, three-story brick building, you could call it a castle. Top two floors are practically a maze, with doors that open into walls, windowless rooms, stairways to nowhere. There's even a trap door that goes down to what used to be a lime pit.
 
2014-08-28 02:23:37 PM  

Bloody William: theflatline: yakmans_dad: theflatline:

We also have a basement that had a coal burning furnace that would make Freddie Krueger envious.

Our first house had a gravity flow furnace that had been converted from coal. Huge firebox and a real spider web of vents. No fan. And the thermostat was powered by a thermocouple.  That came in handy when an ice storm knocked out power in the neighborhood. We were the only ones whose furnace kept going. Ruinously expensive otherwise, though.

My house is in Florida, built by a new architect, which is why we had the coal furnace.

All of my utilities run through my basement, and while there are stairs that go straight down my father built a 150 lb trap door with an iron floor to walk on with a light in the kitchen to let you know someone is in the basement.

Whenever the cable guy or gas guy come they always treat me like I am Dr. Lecter.

My house in Chicago was built in 1893. Beautiful, three-story brick building, you could call it a castle. Top two floors are practically a maze, with doors that open into walls, windowless rooms, stairways to nowhere. There's even a trap door that goes down to what used to be a lime pit.


I read "Devil in the White City", too.
 
2014-08-28 02:26:46 PM  
At least if there is a water shortage, you could use the huge Pabst storage tanks as a substitute for flushing your toilets.
 
2014-08-28 02:29:24 PM  

Bloody William: theflatline: yakmans_dad: theflatline:

We also have a basement that had a coal burning furnace that would make Freddie Krueger envious.

Our first house had a gravity flow furnace that had been converted from coal. Huge firebox and a real spider web of vents. No fan. And the thermostat was powered by a thermocouple.  That came in handy when an ice storm knocked out power in the neighborhood. We were the only ones whose furnace kept going. Ruinously expensive otherwise, though.

My house is in Florida, built by a new architect, which is why we had the coal furnace.

All of my utilities run through my basement, and while there are stairs that go straight down my father built a 150 lb trap door with an iron floor to walk on with a light in the kitchen to let you know someone is in the basement.

Whenever the cable guy or gas guy come they always treat me like I am Dr. Lecter.

My house in Chicago was built in 1893. Beautiful, three-story brick building, you could call it a castle. Top two floors are practically a maze, with doors that open into walls, windowless rooms, stairways to nowhere. There's even a trap door that goes down to what used to be a lime pit.


Cool story, Mr. Mudgett!
 
2014-08-28 02:36:07 PM  
Pabst beer in Florida, tastes different, (read worse) than Pabst beer sold in Ohio. I wonder why? Two completely different beers.
 
2014-08-28 02:49:04 PM  

Pick: Pabst beer in Florida, tastes different, (read worse) than Pabst beer sold in Ohio. I wonder why? Two completely different beers.


True, that. Which is why my FIL, snowbird, will fill up his truck with cases of NY PBR to get him through the long, warm winter.
 
2014-08-28 02:57:28 PM  
Uhhh...no, Chicago.  There is only one Pabst Mansion, and it's in Milwaukee.

www.pabstmansion.com

/Typical flatlanders--don't even know what to properly name things.
//"Bears" my ass--more like "raccoons".
///GO PACKERS
 
2014-08-28 05:50:11 PM  
It's beautiful.


i.ytimg.com

//obscure?
 
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