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(Wired)   A handcrafted, $7,500 yurt that's far cooler than your house. Or your beard. Or your tats. Or your choice of local-sourced coffee and gum. Or your highly refined post-punk, '80s-centric ironic sense of fashion. Or the name of your start-up. Or you   (wired.com ) divider line
    More: Obvious, mules  
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4377 clicks; posted to Geek » on 28 Aug 2014 at 1:53 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-08-28 01:03:52 PM  
"Did you say yurt?"
i1.ytimg.com
 
2014-08-28 01:13:05 PM  
Meh.  Yurts are so early 2000's.  All the cool kids are sleeping in lavvu's now.
 
2014-08-28 01:25:10 PM  
It gets to minus 40 f at my house in winter.
How's it hold up at -40o
 
2014-08-28 01:41:30 PM  
does that $7500 include a hipster dickbag of your own to haul around the floor platform?
 
2014-08-28 01:46:49 PM  

vudukungfu: It gets to minus 40 f at my house in winter.
How's it hold up at -40o


The secret is to have a hot dung fueled stove and another tent to sleep inside the yurt so you stay warm.
 
2014-08-28 02:05:07 PM  

Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: vudukungfu: It gets to minus 40 f at my house in winter.
How's it hold up at -40o

The secret is to have a hot dung fueled stove and another tent to sleep inside the yurt so you stay warm.


actually if you use modern insulating materials when you put it together, the stove is all you need.

by 'modern insulating materials' i mean a couple layers of bubble wrap and a layer of that silvered bubble wrap they use for insulating food for shipment. it's stunning how effective it is. you could probably get away with using a bunch of aluminized mylar, too(lots of those survival blankets in other words)
 
2014-08-28 02:06:17 PM  

vudukungfu: It gets to minus 40 f at my house in winter.
How's it hold up at -40o


The goal seems to be "cool," and I'm sure that with occupants inside, the temp should still get down to -20 or so, and I think that's still cool. And cooler than your house, as stated in the article.
 
2014-08-28 02:08:53 PM  
img3.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2014-08-28 02:12:50 PM  
No. No, subby, it's not. That looks unlivable.
 
2014-08-28 02:13:36 PM  
Wait... I'm SUPPOSED to have a beard, tats, a choice of local-sourced coffee and gum, Or a highly refined post-punk, 80's-centric ironic sense of fashion?

Now, while I was an actual 1980s postpunk/new romantic/Straight Edge at various times in the actual 1980s, I only had a beard for a few months of my 40+ years (too scratchy), I don't go for tats (too trendy), I'm not into gum, and I drink my coffee out of a Keurig because I couldn't give a shiat about where my coffee comes from.

But I agree. I hate when people who weren't around in the 80s try to dress like they were there, when they clearly don't understand the subtle nuances of true 80s fashion and counter-fashion.
 
2014-08-28 02:16:42 PM  
As a yurt man myself... this design is stupid...

1. Those big ass wooden wall slats are going to be bulky and heavy. Sure it looks nicer than the typical lattice walls, but those things have got to weigh a ton when you stack them all up together.

2. a solid wall like that isn't providing the right kind of insulation for winter camping. The traditional lattice walls work because there is a weatherproof outer layer, an insulated second layer, the dead air space that the lattice make, providing another layer of insulation, then there's another insulating layer on the inside with a reflective heat shield layer over that... With a small wood burning stove, you can keep the inside of a yurt between 70-75f in the dead of winter... (-15f around here)

3. The roofing beams are putting their weight on the wood instead of an aircraft cable. In a modern yurt, the beams put pressure on a cable in an even 360 pattern, spreading the psi over the entire length of the cable. When i set mine up, I hang my 300lbs ass from the rafters to make sure the pressure is equalized on all sides. This design looks like it depends highly upon the strength and quality of the wood being used for the walls.

4. Finally... their platform is too high off the ground... unless they are packing a ton of shiat under that thing, they are going to lose heat from convection... better to build close to the ground... for the family portable set up, i bring modified pallets with us. Rip apart a few other pallets and nail extra planks to fill in the gaps. gets you 4" off the ground, solid floor to walk on, and if you fill the underside with pine bows or vegetation, then it's also insulating...
 
2014-08-28 02:22:39 PM  
FTFA: "glamping. (That's glamour+camping, the bougie version of roughing it.)"

Bourgeoisie. The word is bourgeoisie. The bourgeois act in a bourgeoisie manner.

Speak English, even if the English in question is French. English exists to borrow from other languages.
 
2014-08-28 02:27:32 PM  

Gonz: . English exists to borrow r-word from other languages.


FTFY.
 
2014-08-28 02:37:42 PM  

vudukungfu: It gets to minus 40 f at my house in winter.
How's it hold up at -40o


Doesn't it get that cold in Mongolia?

link
 
2014-08-28 02:38:51 PM  

Gonz: FTFA: "glamping. (That's glamour+camping, the bougie version of roughing it.)"

Bourgeoisie. The word is bourgeoisie. The bourgeois act in a bourgeoisie manner.

Speak English, even if the English in question is French. English exists to borrow from other languages.


We don't just borrow words; on occasion, English has pursued other languages down alleyways to beat them unconscious and riffle their pockets for new vocabulary.
 
2014-08-28 02:40:26 PM  
"During my studies, I got a little bit annoyed with the nature of material production in this world," he says.

Oh. One of those people.
 
2014-08-28 02:44:21 PM  

CeroX: As a yurt man myself... this design is stupid...

1. Those big ass wooden wall slats are going to be bulky and heavy. Sure it looks nicer than the typical lattice walls, but those things have got to weigh a ton when you stack them all up together.

2. a solid wall like that isn't providing the right kind of insulation for winter camping. The traditional lattice walls work because there is a weatherproof outer layer, an insulated second layer, the dead air space that the lattice make, providing another layer of insulation, then there's another insulating layer on the inside with a reflective heat shield layer over that... With a small wood burning stove, you can keep the inside of a yurt between 70-75f in the dead of winter... (-15f around here)

3. The roofing beams are putting their weight on the wood instead of an aircraft cable. In a modern yurt, the beams put pressure on a cable in an even 360 pattern, spreading the psi over the entire length of the cable. When i set mine up, I hang my 300lbs ass from the rafters to make sure the pressure is equalized on all sides. This design looks like it depends highly upon the strength and quality of the wood being used for the walls.

4. Finally... their platform is too high off the ground... unless they are packing a ton of shiat under that thing, they are going to lose heat from convection... better to build close to the ground... for the family portable set up, i bring modified pallets with us. Rip apart a few other pallets and nail extra planks to fill in the gaps. gets you 4" off the ground, solid floor to walk on, and if you fill the underside with pine bows or vegetation, then it's also insulating...


Came here for this, leaving happily. In 20+ years camping at SCA and other events, I've seen enough yurts to know that this damned thing isn't worth $7,500. You can buy a good yurt - as described above - for a third of that price, and have something that not only works properly, but can also be repaired in the field because it doesn't rely on highly customized, over-engineered parts.

If you're worried about putting up a big tent, for a third of that price, you could also buy a 20' x 20' center pole marquee tent, with 400 square feet of usable space, that can be erected in two hours by one (yes, one) person. I know, because that's what I've used for the last 8 years as my pavilion at SCA events. And it's lovely as hell - made by Panther Primitives (see page 22 in that PDF), the software (canvas, ropes, stakes) fits in a few canvas bags, and the hardware (poles) fits either on the roof of my van or in my trailer.

Yet another case of exploiting the clueless for fun & profit. Buy a real yurt or tent, skip the silly toy, and save the extra five grand for the kind of gear you'll need to keep you warm, fed, clothed, and amused in your real yurt or tent.
 
2014-08-28 02:45:08 PM  
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0432325/

People in yurts survive Mongolian winters ok.
 
2014-08-28 02:51:24 PM  
You would need some Acme © instant holes to drop the concrete piers into that the base frame is attached to.
Judging from the photo.
 
2014-08-28 02:52:24 PM  
My indoor plumbing is still far cooler.
 
2014-08-28 02:57:43 PM  
nice headline subby +1
 
2014-08-28 03:08:12 PM  
"A handcrafted, $7,500 yurt that's far cooler Colder than your house"


/Headline adjusted for accuracy.
 
2014-08-28 03:11:04 PM  
Joke's on you, Subby.  I'm homeless.
 
2014-08-28 03:11:45 PM  

Sugarbombs: My indoor plumbing is still far cooler.


This just has to be anti-misogyny bait.
 
2014-08-28 03:24:22 PM  

way south: "A handcrafted, $7,500 yurt that's far cooler Colder than your house"


/Headline adjusted for accuracy.


I could go for that. My AC only gets it down to about 84 in the heat of the afternoon. If I could yurt it down to about 80 or so, I'd be happy.
 
2014-08-28 03:29:45 PM  

tricycleracer: Joke's on you, Subby.  I'm homeless.


But you have access to the Internet!
 
2014-08-28 03:35:40 PM  

JolobinSmokin: vudukungfu: It gets to minus 40 f at my house in winter.
How's it hold up at -40o

Doesn't it get that cold in Mongolia?

link


You can't just say link, you have to actually link to something.
 
2014-08-28 03:40:38 PM  

SMB2811: JolobinSmokin: vudukungfu: It gets to minus 40 f at my house in winter.
How's it hold up at -40o

Doesn't it get that cold in Mongolia?

link

You can't just say link, you have to actually link to something.


Click on the L, I don't know why it does that
 
2014-08-28 03:42:25 PM  

FormlessOne: made by Panther Primitives (see page 22 in that PDF)


Thanks for that link man... They have some items that are really hard to find that i've been looking for... Specifically their Hudson Bay Tobacco tins... I've been wanting one of those for a couple of years and could never find one that wasn't $200.

Plus i see quite a few other items beyond tents i will probably be getting from them...

thanks a bunch!
 
2014-08-28 03:54:18 PM  

bikerbob59: tricycleracer: Joke's on you, Subby.  I'm homeless.

But you have access to the Internet!


I get WiFi from the McDonald's across the street.

twocents.co
 
2014-08-28 04:00:58 PM  
FTA: But at £4,500 ($7480), the price tag ain't cheap. Then again, if you're ready to simplify your life, it's really not a bad deal compared to New York City rent.

Yeah, good luck with getting a construction or occupancy permit for your yurt in a city.

I have an acquaintance that built one of those "mini houses" but more like a small cave. Neighbors complained to the local jurisdiction (and this was kind of out in the sticks) and, "nope, you can not occupy this as a residence."
 
2014-08-28 04:21:12 PM  

CeroX: FormlessOne: made by Panther Primitives (see page 22 in that PDF)

Thanks for that link man... They have some items that are really hard to find that i've been looking for... Specifically their Hudson Bay Tobacco tins... I've been wanting one of those for a couple of years and could never find one that wasn't $200.

Plus i see quite a few other items beyond tents i will probably be getting from them...

thanks a bunch!


I love those folks - I've bought a lot of their merch over the years, and I've yet to regret a purchase from them.
 
2014-08-28 04:34:35 PM  

Unobtanium: FTA: But at £4,500 ($7480), the price tag ain't cheap. Then again, if you're ready to simplify your life, it's really not a bad deal compared to New York City rent.

Yeah, good luck with getting a construction or occupancy permit for your yurt in a city.

I have an acquaintance that built one of those "mini houses" but more like a small cave. Neighbors complained to the local jurisdiction (and this was kind of out in the sticks) and, "nope, you can not occupy this as a residence."


Most of these issues pop up because cities have "minimum space" requirements for permanent dwellings, which usually require a footprint of at least >500 sq ft.  To get around this, many people will simply attach wheels to their tiny houses so that they are transitory in nature, and thus are not considered permanent housing.  Of course, every jurisdiction will be different, and you'll not only have to look at the laws of your individual state, but also your local county/municipality statutes, etc.
 
2014-08-28 04:36:43 PM  

bikerbob59: tricycleracer: Joke's on you, Subby.  I'm homeless.

But you have access to the Internet!


That's cauz 'Merkin Puhrs are the richest puhrs on the globe... What with Obummer fonez, EBT cards that work at Whole Paycheck Markets, Section 8 housing that must have clean/city water to drink and flush toilets; and popping out as many chitlen's as you want and Uncle Sugar keeps them Welfare chechz a coming!!!

Access to high speed Intra~tubez is a right. So eat shiat; you farkin 1%!
 
2014-08-28 04:54:19 PM  

redflag: Unobtanium: FTA: But at £4,500 ($7480), the price tag ain't cheap. Then again, if you're ready to simplify your life, it's really not a bad deal compared to New York City rent.

Yeah, good luck with getting a construction or occupancy permit for your yurt in a city.

I have an acquaintance that built one of those "mini houses" but more like a small cave. Neighbors complained to the local jurisdiction (and this was kind of out in the sticks) and, "nope, you can not occupy this as a residence."

Most of these issues pop up because cities have "minimum space" requirements for permanent dwellings, which usually require a footprint of at least >500 sq ft.  To get around this, many people will simply attach wheels to their tiny houses so that they are transitory in nature, and thus are not considered permanent housing.  Of course, every jurisdiction will be different, and you'll not only have to look at the laws of your individual state, but also your local county/municipality statutes, etc.


This one was much simpler - no lavatory inside. But the person had restroom privileges in the house on the property. The REAL issue, I think, is it was "ugly" - more or less made to look like a section of a large, hollow tree on its side
 
2014-08-28 08:12:59 PM  
yurts were cool when tree houses were big.
 
2014-08-28 11:28:28 PM  
Oh, a yurt, a handcrafted yurt, like many tens of thousands of people, probably hundreds of thousands if not millions, live in today?

Incidentally, those Mongolian yurts are dismissed as shanties but the pictures make them seem as nice as apartments I've lived in. They just need electricity, running water, and sewage. I really hate reading NGO speak because these assholes never seem to think "rather than tearing down everything and moving everyone, why don't we just fix the problems in place and find a way to get these people title to the land they are living on?"
 
2014-08-29 03:17:30 AM  
A seventy five hundred dollar plywood circle with a roof.

....wow
 
2014-08-29 08:39:29 AM  

Dumb-Ass-Monkey: A seventy five hundred dollar plywood circle with a roof.

....wow


I'm pretty sure that with the same amount of money I could build something much nicer.  And I suck at that sort of thing.
 
2014-08-29 08:58:52 AM  
Aren't all yurts hand crafted?  Is there some yurt factory mass producing these things?

/hee hee I might use "yurt factory" as my new nickname for [redacted because you have two chromosomes and therefore any joke you make must be sexist]
 
2014-08-29 12:14:16 PM  
do people still say 'cool'  ?

/cool !
// ayyyyye !!
 
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