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(National Geographic)   Entangled red and yellow photons are used to take a picture of a cat that is both detected and undetected   (news.nationalgeographic.com) divider line 15
    More: Cool, quantum, quantum physics, quantum entanglements, quantum optics, Schrodinger, new physics, infrared, imaging science  
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2533 clicks; posted to Geek » on 28 Aug 2014 at 11:20 AM (2 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



15 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-08-28 10:32:14 AM
I care and don't care... which makes me happy and sad.
 
2014-08-28 11:29:02 AM
That. That... is so cool it's disturbing. The original "ghost imaging" experiment was also cool, but it didn't really lend itself to a practical application, at least, not when I first read it. This? The possibilities are intriguing.
 
2014-08-28 11:33:45 AM
Spooky.
 
2014-08-28 11:37:20 AM
I didn't realize you could use yellow wavelength to cancel out red wavelength, but then again I'm not a physicist and I know I missed something important here. But this is pretty rad.
 
2014-08-28 11:39:08 AM
Spooky indeed.

i.imgur.com

Science, biatch!
 
2014-08-28 11:44:24 AM

sxacho: I didn't realize you could use yellow wavelength to cancel out red wavelength, but then again I'm not a physicist and I know I missed something important here. But this is pretty rad.


Yes, they cancel only if one is half a wavelength out of step with the other. You would need a to accurately place a red wave generator half a wavelength away from a yellow wave generator and strictly control their timing.

Fun example.
http://www.exploratorium.edu/ronh/bubbles/bubble_colors.html
 
2014-08-28 12:11:34 PM
So never crossing the beams is cool now?
 
2014-08-28 12:48:29 PM
They just going to piss of Sokar again.
 
2014-08-28 12:49:04 PM
*off
 
2014-08-28 01:11:37 PM
Red Photon
Yellow Photon
Red Photon
Yellow Photon
Red Photon
Yellow Photon
 
2014-08-28 01:13:27 PM
Because I feel stupid when it comes to this stuff somebody let me know if I understood this article.

Scientists entangle the photons of a red laser with the photons of a yellow laser. Then they shine the red laser at a stencil of a cat and the light is discarded. The yellow laser, responding to the stencil the red one hit, shows a picture of the cat.

I don't get the part about running the red light parallel and at right angles to the yellow before being discarded though. Is that somehow significant? Or is that how they entangle them? Articles always fail to explain how they actually entangle the photons.
 
2014-08-28 01:23:35 PM
My... brain... hurts!
 
2014-08-28 01:53:04 PM

To The Escape Zeppelin!: Because I feel stupid when it comes to this stuff somebody let me know if I understood this article.

Scientists entangle the photons of a red laser with the photons of a yellow laser. Then they shine the red laser at a stencil of a cat and the light is discarded. The yellow laser, responding to the stencil the red one hit, shows a picture of the cat.

I don't get the part about running the red light parallel and at right angles to the yellow before being discarded though. Is that somehow significant? Or is that how they entangle them? Articles always fail to explain how they actually entangle the photons.



yeah, me too,  what he said.
 
2014-08-28 03:18:27 PM

oohpah: To The Escape Zeppelin!: Because I feel stupid when it comes to this stuff somebody let me know if I understood this article.

Scientists entangle the photons of a red laser with the photons of a yellow laser. Then they shine the red laser at a stencil of a cat and the light is discarded. The yellow laser, responding to the stencil the red one hit, shows a picture of the cat.

I don't get the part about running the red light parallel and at right angles to the yellow before being discarded though. Is that somehow significant? Or is that how they entangle them? Articles always fail to explain how they actually entangle the photons.


yeah, me too,  what he said.


I guessed that the photons weren't really entangled like that, they were just in sync. But as I stated above, this is probably beyond my understanding. That said, here's my take on it. So the red and yellow are in sync but separate. Some of the red goes through the stencil while some gets stopped by the stencil. What goes through is in the shape of a cat. Reflect/refract this cat beam to join the still in sync yellow beam. Red cat beam cancels out an area of the yellow beam in the shape of a cat. This leaves a negative cat image in yellow even though the yellow doesn't know anything about no cats.

I don't think there's any "entangling" going on here. But I'd love to hear another explanation.
 
2014-08-28 04:21:02 PM
Subatomic triangulation?

Or Interpretation of entangled perspective?
 
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