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(Guardian)   "Will any current car models survive long enough on the road to achieve the status of vintage classics of 21st-century design?" Your 1984 lime-green Hyundai Pony is NOT a classic   (theguardian.com) divider line 25
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398 clicks; posted to FarkUs » on 27 Aug 2014 at 1:36 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-08-27 11:55:46 AM  
How far back are we considering 'current'? Does there have to be a certain number of vehicles produced to qualify? I like the TVR Typhoon and the Local Motors Rally Fighter to name a few.
 
2014-08-27 12:27:39 PM  
Really it's the ones that survive. Broncos and Stationwagons from the 80s are highly sought after
 
2014-08-27 12:28:40 PM  

IgG4: Really it's the ones that survive. Broncos and Stationwagons from the 80s are highly sought after


I'm guessing the "vintage" market will eventually be flooded with Camrys.
 
2014-08-27 12:36:48 PM  
The problem I foresee is that modern autos are so farking complex and rely on specialized electronics to the extent that they'll be virtually un-servicable in 50 years.

If most any no-longer-available part on your Model T breaks, you can go to a machine shop and have a replacement made in an hour. (If you own a lathe, you can probably make it yourself)

If the engine management computer on your 2013 Mercedes breaks in 2113, you're more than likely boned.
 
2014-08-27 01:00:44 PM  

Eddie Adams from Torrance: The problem I foresee is that modern autos are so farking complex and rely on specialized electronics to the extent that they'll be virtually un-servicable in 50 years.

If most any no-longer-available part on your Model T breaks, you can go to a machine shop and have a replacement made in an hour. (If you own a lathe, you can probably make it yourself)

If the engine management computer on your 2013 Mercedes breaks in 2113, you're more than likely boned.


No. In 2113 you'll have the engine computer either repaired by a nanite swarm in a paste, or you'll have a new one printed. Stop thinking gas station, start thinking space station.
 
2014-08-27 01:39:34 PM  
My car is 15 years old and feels ancient.
 
2014-08-27 02:19:27 PM  

Eddie Adams from Torrance: The problem I foresee is that modern autos are so farking complex and rely on specialized electronics to the extent that they'll be virtually un-servicable in 50 years.

If most any no-longer-available part on your Model T breaks, you can go to a machine shop and have a replacement made in an hour. (If you own a lathe, you can probably make it yourself)

If the engine management computer on your 2013 Mercedes breaks in 2113, you're more than likely boned.


this. the sad thing is the companies have done their worst to make this info unavailable.

however- I'm also a big fan of human creativity-

first- government bailouts of gm and Chrysler may put computer specs in public domain for those brands,

and if guy will reverse engineer these

http://www.400gt.com/articles/Gardiner/C&G.htm

At a time when old cars again command incredible value, the world offers many shops restoring/remaking bodies, chassis frames and machined components, but C&G is one of very few reproducing whole engines. They started 25 years ago with Bugatti straight eights-brand-new ones from the sumps up. Then came the Climax FPF, the 2.5-liter four-cylinder so vital to owner-racers of late-1950s Coopers and Lotuses. The company has also satisfied crying needs for new Maserati Birdcage fours, Ferrari 312 flat-12s, Aston and Jaguar sixes, and the Mercedes-Benz M154 V12.


why not electronics? complex, yes, magic, not so much. What will someone pay?
 
2014-08-27 05:16:47 PM  

Eddie Adams from Torrance: The problem I foresee is that modern autos are so farking complex and rely on specialized electronics to the extent that they'll be virtually un-servicable in 50 years.

If most any no-longer-available part on your Model T breaks, you can go to a machine shop and have a replacement made in an hour. (If you own a lathe, you can probably make it yourself)

If the engine management computer on your 2013 Mercedes breaks in 2113, you're more than likely boned.


I've been hearing the same crap since the 80's.  You can already chip your ride for performance, It's no harder to just replace it.
 
2014-08-27 05:17:00 PM  

realityVSperception: Eddie Adams from Torrance: The problem I foresee is that modern autos are so farking complex and rely on specialized electronics to the extent that they'll be virtually un-servicable in 50 years.

If most any no-longer-available part on your Model T breaks, you can go to a machine shop and have a replacement made in an hour. (If you own a lathe, you can probably make it yourself)

If the engine management computer on your 2013 Mercedes breaks in 2113, you're more than likely boned.

this. the sad thing is the companies have done their worst to make this info unavailable.

however- I'm also a big fan of human creativity-

first- government bailouts of gm and Chrysler may put computer specs in public domain for those brands,

and if guy will reverse engineer these

http://www.400gt.com/articles/Gardiner/C&G.htm

At a time when old cars again command incredible value, the world offers many shops restoring/remaking bodies, chassis frames and machined components, but C&G is one of very few reproducing whole engines. They started 25 years ago with Bugatti straight eights-brand-new ones from the sumps up. Then came the Climax FPF, the 2.5-liter four-cylinder so vital to owner-racers of late-1950s Coopers and Lotuses. The company has also satisfied crying needs for new Maserati Birdcage fours, Ferrari 312 flat-12s, Aston and Jaguar sixes, and the Mercedes-Benz M154 V12.


why not electronics? complex, yes, magic, not so much. What will someone pay?


I had to give away my wife's ten year old New Beetle because the computer got electronic Alzheimer's.  The car ran fine, but every once in a while the computer would refuse to recognize the key and decide it was being stolen.  It eventually spent three solid weeks in the shop with my mechanic tearing his hair out trying to decipher some of VW's "proprietary" stuff, and getting nowhere.  The deal told me "new computer" which would cost more than the car was worth, so we called up the chairty people and just had it towed away as a donation.

All because of some farked up software somewhere.

Wound up giving the wife my car and bought a ten year old Tacoma.  The only thing automatic in that is the transmission.  Indestructible machine and dirt simple to fix.
 
2014-08-27 05:41:38 PM  
I saw a '92 or '93 Grand Marquis with collector plates a few weeks ago, so, yes?

/my 2000 is still incredibly easy to work on
//except for getting to the Jesus bolt on the top of the starter
///damn you Ford for shiat-canning the Panther platform!!!
 
2014-08-27 06:38:17 PM  
Modern cars eh? I'd bet on Aston Martin. I still think they have some of the best looking cars on the road. I also think Lotus will hang in there, Porsche, Ferrari etc. For American the special muscle cars, the vette...maybe the new Viper.
 
2014-08-27 07:05:40 PM  
metal quality these days is shiat so  im putting my money on no there once was a time when you could straighten out minor dents on a car with a blowtorch dont try that on anything newer
 
2014-08-28 06:23:25 AM  
My '98 Honda Civic will probably not reach Oldtimer age. Surprised that it still works after all the abuse it is getting. Still does over 120 mph on the autobahn.
 
2014-08-28 07:44:30 AM  
Cars no longer have any panache; there's no soul to new designs.  Where have you gone, Harley Earl?
 
2014-08-28 11:34:11 AM  
I guess submitter meant 20th Century.

Right?
 
2014-08-28 11:34:51 AM  

Spanky McStupid: Cars no longer have any panache; there's no soul to new designs.  Where have you gone, Harley Earl?


That's why I drive an 8 year-old pickup.  I gave up on style.
 
2014-08-28 02:19:21 PM  

Spanky McStupid: Cars no longer have any panache; there's no soul to new designs.  Where have you gone, Harley Earl?


You could add Brooks Stevens and Raymond Loewy to the list.
 
2014-08-28 03:16:15 PM  
Cars these days are a commodity, not an investment.
 
2014-08-28 03:21:02 PM  

a_burlap_sack_of_kittens: metal quality these days is shiat so  im putting my money on no there once was a time when you could straighten out minor dents on a car with a blowtorch dont try that on anything newer


I had a little fender bender in my 2009 Silverado.  Insurance didn't even want to try to straighten it, replaced the whole bedside.  Insurance and repair guy told me the metal was so thin it wouldn't work to even try to straighten it.
 
2014-08-28 04:30:41 PM  
I had a Yugo (bought new in 198 for $3999) and had to get rid of it about 5 years ago. It had well over 200K miles on it but parts became almost impossible to find. The car very rarely needed servicing (probably in part because I kept up with basic care) but, in my case, a part of the steering mechanism eventually went bad and I found the part was prohibitively expensive to buy (and ship from Texas to Florida). The parts became scarce when the war in Yugoslavia began to get heavy though at the time it wasn't covered much in the news. People laughed because the car was "so small". Well, compared to the Mini-Cooper of today it was huge.  It was a great little car that got bashed mainly because it was cheap and a threat to larger American cars.
 
2014-08-28 04:32:04 PM  

MelGoesOnTour: I had a Yugo (bought new in 1988 for $3999) and had to get rid of it about 5 years ago. It had well over 200K miles on it but parts became almost impossible to find. The car very rarely needed servicing (probably in part because I kept up with basic care) but, in my case, a part of the steering mechanism eventually went bad and I found the part was prohibitively expensive to buy (and ship from Texas to Florida). The parts became scarce when the war in Yugoslavia began to get heavy though at the time it wasn't covered much in the news. People laughed because the car was "so small". Well, compared to the Mini-Cooper of today it was huge.  It was a great little car that got bashed mainly because it was cheap and a threat to larger American cars.


Oops, FTFM.
 
2014-08-28 04:40:17 PM  

MelGoesOnTour: MelGoesOnTour: I had a Yugo (bought new in 1988 for $3999) and had to get rid of it about 5 years ago. It had well over 200K miles on it but parts became almost impossible to find. The car very rarely needed servicing (probably in part because I kept up with basic care) but, in my case, a part of the steering mechanism eventually went bad and I found the part was prohibitively expensive to buy (and ship from Texas to Florida). The parts became scarce when the war in Yugoslavia began to get heavy though at the time it wasn't covered much in the news. People laughed because the car was "so small". Well, compared to the Mini-Cooper of today it was huge.  It was a great little car that got bashed mainly because it was cheap and a threat to larger American cars.

Oops, FTFM.


Thanks for fixing - was VERY concerned I'd missed something in World History classes (which were so long ago it was a rather short class).

Now for my question: isn't the Yugo the car featured all over that Bette Midler movie (where everyone had a motive to murder her)?
 
2014-08-28 04:46:30 PM  

mama2tnt: MelGoesOnTour: MelGoesOnTour: I had a Yugo (bought new in 1988 for $3999) and had to get rid of it about 5 years ago. It had well over 200K miles on it but parts became almost impossible to find. The car very rarely needed servicing (probably in part because I kept up with basic care) but, in my case, a part of the steering mechanism eventually went bad and I found the part was prohibitively expensive to buy (and ship from Texas to Florida). The parts became scarce when the war in Yugoslavia began to get heavy though at the time it wasn't covered much in the news. People laughed because the car was "so small". Well, compared to the Mini-Cooper of today it was huge.  It was a great little car that got bashed mainly because it was cheap and a threat to larger American cars.

Oops, FTFM.

Thanks for fixing - was VERY concerned I'd missed something in World History classes (which were so long ago it was a rather short class).

Now for my question: isn't the Yugo the car featured all over that Bette Midler movie (where everyone had a motive to murder her)?


Yep. I forgot the name of the movie but that was it.
 
2014-08-28 04:58:32 PM  

MelGoesOnTour: mama2tnt: Now for my question: isn't the Yugo the car featured all over that Bette Midler movie (where everyone had a motive to murder her)?

Yep. I forgot the name of the movie but that was it.


"Drowning Mona." (Full disclosure: googled it, as I remembered "Mona" but forgot the gerund. Older than dirt - or, for you kids, I'm about a quarter century older than the emoticon.)
 
2014-08-28 06:47:41 PM  
I saw an AMC Pacer yesterday that looked in mint condition.
 
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