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(TreeHugger)   Remember the good old days when you could swim at the beach and not worry about the sunscreen washing off your body and killing all the local marine animals?   (treehugger.com) divider line 33
    More: Sad, Dr. Cinzia Corinaldesi, hydrogen peroxides, personal care products  
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2965 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Aug 2014 at 11:42 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



33 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-08-27 09:58:17 AM  
i1138.photobucket.com
 
2014-08-27 11:32:42 AM  
The link at the bottom of the page listing 10 safe sunscreens has products that include titanium dioxide which is what the article here says is bad for ocean life.
 
2014-08-27 11:46:14 AM  
What's that full body swim suit Arabian women wear?

Is that the future for us all?
 
2014-08-27 11:50:01 AM  
But I have a right to poison the waters and kill the fishes. I have a duty to. Given by God.

Then God said, "Let us make human beings in our image, to be like us. They will reign over the fish in the sea, the birds in the sky, the livestock, all the wild animals on the earth, and the small animals that scurry along the ground. They will glorify our name with their pesticides, sport hunting, reclaiming of wetlands, clear cutting, overpopulation and in so many ways echo the very beginning of my creation...Now the earth was formless and empty."
 
2014-08-27 11:59:37 AM  
I'd rather have fish in the sea than a sadistic God in the sky.
 
2014-08-27 12:01:26 PM  
Nope
 
2014-08-27 12:09:42 PM  
I also remember a time when I used to give a shiat. It is after all, the fishes fault. They chose to live in the water.
 
2014-08-27 12:21:26 PM  
media.treehugger.com

This is a pretty cool photo, even if it is of sunscreen pollution.
 
2014-08-27 12:25:46 PM  
People still swim before showering that shiat off?  Try that in Cozumel and you're likely to get your ass kicked by the local Greens.
 
2014-08-27 12:36:53 PM  

Turbo Cojones: People still swim before showering that shiat off?  Try that in Cozumel and you're likely to get your ass kicked by the local Greens.


You know you can get sunburned while swimming, right?
 
2014-08-27 12:43:56 PM  

tlars699: [media.treehugger.com image 650x636]

This is a pretty cool photo, even if it is of sunscreen pollution.


? The caption in TFA labels that as an image of a phytoplankton bloom.
 
2014-08-27 12:44:25 PM  
Dear Manon Verchot,

BULLCRAP!

Sincerely, C&J
 
2014-08-27 12:46:33 PM  

Crass and Jaded Mother Farker: Dear Manon Verchot,

BULLCRAP!

Sincerely, C&J


What is your basis for disputing the information in TFA?
 
2014-08-27 12:50:02 PM  
I've seen this beach in a video.  Anyone know the one I'm talking about?

/that should set up some epic responses...
 
2014-08-27 12:53:12 PM  

Repo Man: tlars699: [media.treehugger.com image 650x636]

This is a pretty cool photo, even if it is of sunscreen pollution.

? The caption in TFA labels that as an image of a phytoplankton bloom.


Whoops! My bad!
Weird that it looks white and not green though...
 
2014-08-27 12:55:40 PM  

InterruptingQuirk: The link at the bottom of the page listing 10 safe sunscreens has products that include titanium dioxide which is what the article here says is bad for ocean life.


You have to allow that it's free-market sponsor type titanium oxide, and that's allowed unless you're a damn commie!
 
2014-08-27 12:58:01 PM  

InterruptingQuirk: Turbo Cojones: People still swim before showering that shiat off?  Try that in Cozumel and you're likely to get your ass kicked by the local Greens.

You know you can get sunburned while swimming, right?


Even more dangerous when wet because water droplets act like magnifying lenses.

That's why ants don't swim.
 
2014-08-27 12:58:24 PM  
Remember the good old days when you could swim at the beach and not worry about the sunscreen washing off your body and killing all the local marine animals?

What do you mean "good old days"?  I don't worry about that now.
 
2014-08-27 01:07:59 PM  
Tanning oil never hurt anybody.

Remember, the Sun killed everyone ever in the history of everything before the sunscreen industry came along. There is no way on earth that sunscreen will ever have anything wrong with it that will make you regret slathering pound after pound of it onto your kids. Especially in its aerosol form.
 
2014-08-27 01:16:19 PM  

undernova: Tanning oil never hurt anybody.

Remember, the Sun killed everyone ever in the history of everything before the sunscreen industry came along. There is no way on earth that sunscreen will ever have anything wrong with it that will make you regret slathering pound after pound of it onto your kids. Especially in its aerosol form.


"The sun is natural, and won't hurt you."

2.bp.blogspot.com

Of course, skin cancer is natural as well.
 
2014-08-27 01:24:07 PM  
i.imgur.com
 
2014-08-27 01:42:59 PM  

InterruptingQuirk: The link at the bottom of the page listing 10 safe sunscreens has products that include titanium dioxide which is what the article here says is bad for ocean life.


You know where titanium dioxide comes from? Sand.
 
2014-08-27 01:56:25 PM  
This has always been true.   In Hawaii they have signs to this effect, and right next to them, you see fat farks slathering on sunscreen.

/glad I got to see it before the sewage runoff clouded the water
//and the sunscreen killed the coral
///reaping what you sow, how does it work?
 
2014-08-27 01:56:46 PM  
This is what rash guards are for. A good rash guard can be worn while swimming and will give better protection than sunscreen.

Also, it's mostly white people that are at risk from skin cancer. Other people can get it, but the risk is much, much lower. It's a genetic thing, like how salt-sensitive hypertension is more common in black people.
 
2014-08-27 02:08:33 PM  
Here's a National Geographic article from over six years ago about sunscreen's toxic effects on coral. If this has been known for a while, where are the eco friendly sunscreens?
 
2014-08-27 02:11:32 PM  

Repo Man: Here's a National Geographic article from over six years ago about sunscreen's toxic effects on coral. If this has been known for a while, where are the eco friendly sunscreens?


Not as cheap?
 
2014-08-27 02:13:33 PM  

adamatari: This is what rash guards are for. A good rash guard can be worn while swimming and will give better protection than sunscreen.

Also, it's mostly white people that are at risk from skin cancer. Other people can get it, but the risk is much, much lower. It's a genetic thing, like how salt-sensitive hypertension is more common in black people.


No offense, but is your name Ric Romero?
 
2014-08-27 03:38:58 PM  

Ivo Shandor: InterruptingQuirk: The link at the bottom of the page listing 10 safe sunscreens has products that include titanium dioxide which is what the article here says is bad for ocean life.

You know where titanium dioxide comes from? Sand.


Any chemists want to take this one
 
2014-08-27 03:53:14 PM  

Repo Man: adamatari: This is what rash guards are for. A good rash guard can be worn while swimming and will give better protection than sunscreen.

Also, it's mostly white people that are at risk from skin cancer. Other people can get it, but the risk is much, much lower. It's a genetic thing, like how salt-sensitive hypertension is more common in black people.

No offense, but is your name Ric Romero?


Yes, yes it is. Though it's not just white people putting on a lot of sunscreen.
 
2014-08-27 04:14:29 PM  

InterruptingQuirk: Ivo Shandor: InterruptingQuirk: The link at the bottom of the page listing 10 safe sunscreens has products that include titanium dioxide which is what the article here says is bad for ocean life.

You know where titanium dioxide comes from? Sand.

Any chemists want to take this one


The titanium in sand is greatly diluted by all the non-titanium.  It's not titanium dixoide, it's silica with tiny amounts of titanium.  That isn't remotely close to the same stuff.

When I was doing my M.Sc., another grad student in the same lab was studying the effects of TiO2 in sunscreens on cells.  It was brutal.  TiO2 absorbs UV, which stops it getting to your skin, but then it uses the energy from the UV photons to slice up the organic sunblockers in the sunscreen and turn them into radicals...which cause cancer.

tl;dr version: TiO2 is bad for the boys and girls, bad for the fishes in the deep blue see, bad for you and me.
 
2014-08-27 04:27:02 PM  

Bondith: InterruptingQuirk: Ivo Shandor: InterruptingQuirk: The link at the bottom of the page listing 10 safe sunscreens has products that include titanium dioxide which is what the article here says is bad for ocean life.

You know where titanium dioxide comes from? Sand.

Any chemists want to take this one

The titanium in sand is greatly diluted by all the non-titanium.  It's not titanium dixoide, it's silica with tiny amounts of titanium.  That isn't remotely close to the same stuff.

When I was doing my M.Sc., another grad student in the same lab was studying the effects of TiO2 in sunscreens on cells.  It was brutal.  TiO2 absorbs UV, which stops it getting to your skin, but then it uses the energy from the UV photons to slice up the organic sunblockers in the sunscreen and turn them into radicals...which cause cancer.

tl;dr version: TiO2 is bad for the boys and girls, bad for the fishes in the deep blue see, bad for you and me.


Thank you very much!
 
2014-08-27 05:05:08 PM  

Bondith: The titanium in sand is greatly diluted by all the non-titanium. It's not titanium dixoide, it's silica with tiny amounts of titanium. That isn't remotely close to the same stuff.


It depends which beach you are looking at, e.g. from (PDF):

The bulk of the world's production of titanium minerals is derived from beach sand, although ilmenite is also mined from hard rock deposits in Canada and Norway [3]. The existence in many places on the coasts of Sri Lanka of natural concentrates of titanium-bearing mineral sands such as ilmenite and rutile with a high degree of purity has been know since as far back as 1903 [4].  [...] The deposit is very high grade, with a heavy mineral content of 80% and a composition of 70-72% ilmenite, 8-10% zircon, 8% rutile, 1% sillimanite and 0.3% monazite [1].

Ilmenite is a different compound but the mineral rutile is titanium dioxide, chemically the same as what's in the sunscreen (albeit with a different average particle size).
 
2014-08-27 10:05:21 PM  

InterruptingQuirk: Bondith: InterruptingQuirk: Ivo Shandor: InterruptingQuirk: The link at the bottom of the page listing 10 safe sunscreens has products that include titanium dioxide which is what the article here says is bad for ocean life.

You know where titanium dioxide comes from? Sand.

Any chemists want to take this one

The titanium in sand is greatly diluted by all the non-titanium.  It's not titanium dixoide, it's silica with tiny amounts of titanium.  That isn't remotely close to the same stuff.

When I was doing my M.Sc., another grad student in the same lab was studying the effects of TiO2 in sunscreens on cells.  It was brutal.  TiO2 absorbs UV, which stops it getting to your skin, but then it uses the energy from the UV photons to slice up the organic sunblockers in the sunscreen and turn them into radicals...which cause cancer.

tl;dr version: TiO2 is bad for the boys and girls, bad for the fishes in the deep blue see, bad for you and me.

Thank you very much!


See also Ivo Shandor's post directly above this one.
 
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