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(Joe.ie)   Very cool graphic shows 30 years of format changes in the music industry in 30 seconds   (joe.ie) divider line 75
    More: Spiffy  
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5965 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 26 Aug 2014 at 12:16 PM (9 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-08-26 09:48:42 AM  
I think it's cool how LPs drop well under 1% then end on 1.3% in 2010.  They're coming back baby!

/What do I do with all of my Metallica tapes?!
 
2014-08-26 11:00:25 AM  

UberDave: I think it's cool how LPs drop well under 1% then end on 1.3% in 2010.  They're coming back baby!

/What do I do with all of my Metallica tapes?!


Hope Lars doesn't find out about them and try to sue you?
 
2014-08-26 12:24:16 PM  
Interesting how the CD pretty much ate all the LP market share without touching cassettes at first, then started eating the cassettes for dessert.
 
2014-08-26 12:27:13 PM  
My music collection consists of all band that you have never heard of on vinyl.
 
2014-08-26 12:33:14 PM  

Bukharin: Interesting how the CD pretty much ate all the LP market share without touching cassettes at first, then started eating the cassettes for dessert.


I think it had to do with how the CD debuted as a HiFi, non portable option. Once portable CD players (Especially those with anti skip) became available and affordable, that's when the CD started eating cassettes
 
2014-08-26 12:34:15 PM  

Bukharin: Interesting how the CD pretty much ate all the LP market share without touching cassettes at first, then started eating the cassettes for dessert.


Relative portability and a lag for the automotive CD player to become a thing.
 
2014-08-26 12:34:47 PM  

Bukharin: Interesting how the CD pretty much ate all the LP market share without touching cassettes at first, then started eating the cassettes for dessert.


I guess that cassettes were able to hang on right up until in-car CD players became a thing.
 
2014-08-26 12:41:29 PM  

the_sidewinder: Bukharin: Interesting how the CD pretty much ate all the LP market share without touching cassettes at first, then started eating the cassettes for dessert.

I think it had to do with how the CD debuted as a HiFi, non portable option. Once portable CD players (Especially those with anti skip) became available and affordable, that's when the CD started eating cassettes


LOL anti-skip god did having a cd player without that meant you might as well throw it away.
 
2014-08-26 12:45:04 PM  
The 13 year old Corrola I just bought for a work car only has cassette.  Luckily I found some tapes at an estate sale recently!  It's either Elvis or the Monkees for my daily commute (radio broken)

/not your steppin stone
 
2014-08-26 12:46:12 PM  
For real fun they should produce a graphic of the whining from the music industry who claimed that each of these format changed would kill it.
 
2014-08-26 12:50:50 PM  
I'm surprised they bothered showing the 0% each for DVD-A and SACD

/DVD-A, not DV/DA
 
2014-08-26 12:53:15 PM  

btraz70: The 13 year old Corrola I just bought for a work car only has cassette.  Luckily I found some tapes at an estate sale recently!  It's either Elvis or the Monkees for my daily commute (radio broken)

/not your steppin stone


You know for about $50 you can buy a new car radio with a Mp3 input and install it yourself. There was a time when this was a ritual performed by everyone when they bought their first car. It's shockingly simple as long as you don't play with the cables that control the airbags.
 
2014-08-26 12:57:11 PM  
No 78s?  How about my Edison cylinders?

Also, what a horrible graphic.  Stacked bar charts or a stacked line graph would make sense and be informative, not that anigif crap.
 
2014-08-26 12:58:23 PM  

Tyrosine: btraz70: The 13 year old Corrola I just bought for a work car only has cassette.  Luckily I found some tapes at an estate sale recently!  It's either Elvis or the Monkees for my daily commute (radio broken)

/not your steppin stone

You know for about $50 you can buy a new car radio with a Mp3 input and install it yourself. There was a time when this was a ritual performed by everyone when they bought their first car. It's shockingly simple as long as you don't play with the cables that control the airbags.


Or get a $5 cassette adapter.
 
2014-08-26 01:00:14 PM  

Tyrosine: btraz70: The 13 year old Corrola I just bought for a work car only has cassette.  Luckily I found some tapes at an estate sale recently!  It's either Elvis or the Monkees for my daily commute (radio broken)

/not your steppin stone

You know for about $50 you can buy a new car radio with a Mp3 input and install it yourself. There was a time when this was a ritual performed by everyone when they bought their first car. It's shockingly simple as long as you don't play with the cables that control the airbags.


yeah you can get a Boss brand mp3 player for $35 or $50 depending if you want Bluetooth or not.
 
2014-08-26 01:00:22 PM  
www.lolhome.com
 
2014-08-26 01:02:06 PM  

btraz70: The 13 year old Corrola I just bought for a work car only has cassette.  Luckily I found some tapes at an estate sale recently!  It's either Elvis or the Monkees for my daily commute (radio broken)

/not your steppin stone


img.fark.net
 
2014-08-26 01:10:10 PM  
Cassettes are cool again:
www.comicbookresources.com
 
2014-08-26 01:11:40 PM  

Tyrosine: btraz70: The 13 year old Corrola I just bought for a work car only has cassette.  Luckily I found some tapes at an estate sale recently!  It's either Elvis or the Monkees for my daily commute (radio broken)

/not your steppin stone

You know for about $50 you can buy a new car radio with a Mp3 input and install it yourself. There was a time when this was a ritual performed by everyone when they bought their first car. It's shockingly simple as long as you don't play with the cables that control the airbags.


Back when cars had the radio as a stand-alone module and were a generation back from the modern stuff it was easy and worthwhile to install your own.  Now, it's getting common for the radio to be part of the information center and just as good as any aftermarket..  Pull a radio and you can cripple all your interior's gadgets.  Then again, we are talking about a 2001 Corolla, the radios were stand-alone in those.

In the early 90's, I would create mix tapes from my CDs to use in the car.  Still have most of them, even though they would unspool from the vibration of riding around in the car, get cooked in the summer, and the Kraco would eventually eat them.  At the time, car CD players were pricey and a sure way to wreck a $24.99 disc.
 
2014-08-26 01:19:50 PM  
Most of those aren't formats

Shouldn't really be anything other than:
Vinyl
8-track
Cassette
CD
Digital Download
 
2014-08-26 01:20:51 PM  

Car_Ramrod: Tyrosine: btraz70: The 13 year old Corrola I just bought for a work car only has cassette.  Luckily I found some tapes at an estate sale recently!  It's either Elvis or the Monkees for my daily commute (radio broken)

/not your steppin stone

You know for about $50 you can buy a new car radio with a Mp3 input and install it yourself. There was a time when this was a ritual performed by everyone when they bought their first car. It's shockingly simple as long as you don't play with the cables that control the airbags.

Or get a $5 cassette adapter.


True, but my plan also gets him radio if he ever feels the need to listen to a live baseball game, or a fundamentalist christian ranting about how the emancipation proclamation was the work of satan.
 
2014-08-26 01:27:59 PM  
Pie charts are never cool subby.  And just because you can animate something doesn't mean you should. A stacked area chart would be a better way to visualize the data.
 
2014-08-26 01:34:01 PM  

Glenford: Pie charts are never cool subby.  And just because you can animate something doesn't mean you should. A stacked area chart would be a better way to visualize the data.


I don't know, kind of reminds me of a weather-in-motion chart. Not hard to see which way the wind is blowing in the recording format world.
 
2014-08-26 01:44:01 PM  
As someone who has been through all the formats (I'm 60): 45s, LPs, 8-tracks, cassettes, CDs, mp3s, loss-less downloads, etc., I am surprised at how large the percentage of music sales is for downloads. I only buy isolated songs on iTunes (mostly stuff from the 60s or 70s). I still like having a product in my hand, including the liner notes, etc. But the biggest reason I still prefer CDs is that I enjoy listening on component stereo systems. No plugging an iPod into a i-Dock for me. The sad thing is that it's getting more and more difficult to buy middle of the road hi-fi gear these days. When my Technics 5-disc carrousel bit the dust about 6 years ago, I had to resort to buying a used unit on eBay. No one, brick and mortar or online, was selling good CD players, except for VERY high end stuff (we're talking single disc players for 2 grand). I still have my Kyocera receiver that I bought new in 1985 and it still works great. I just don't see the point of listening to music on (a) computer speakers no matter how good, (b) ear buds, or (c) those ridiculously over-priced POS "beats" by Dr Dre, which may be the worst headphones ever made. My $50 Koss cans sound light years better. But nothing beats hearing music played through good bookshelf or floor speakers driven by clean power from a decent receiver.

/lawn yada yada yada
//fondly recall the days when all the stereo manufacturers (Sherwood, Pioneer, Marantz, etc.) advertised gear in magazines
 
2014-08-26 01:59:47 PM  
That graphic sucked.

I shouldn't have to try to read labels that are jumping around and changing values every second.

Reading is hard enough without having to do it fast.
 
2014-08-26 02:02:13 PM  

BrianGriffin: As someone who has been through all the formats (I'm 60): 45s, LPs, 8-tracks, cassettes, CDs, mp3s, loss-less downloads, etc., I am surprised at how large the percentage of music sales is for downloads. I only buy isolated songs on iTunes (mostly stuff from the 60s or 70s). I still like having a product in my hand, including the liner notes, etc. But the biggest reason I still prefer CDs is that I enjoy listening on component stereo systems. No plugging an iPod into a i-Dock for me. The sad thing is that it's getting more and more difficult to buy middle of the road hi-fi gear these days. When my Technics 5-disc carrousel bit the dust about 6 years ago, I had to resort to buying a used unit on eBay. No one, brick and mortar or online, was selling good CD players, except for VERY high end stuff (we're talking single disc players for 2 grand). I still have my Kyocera receiver that I bought new in 1985 and it still works great. I just don't see the point of listening to music on (a) computer speakers no matter how good, (b) ear buds, or (c) those ridiculously over-priced POS "beats" by Dr Dre, which may be the worst headphones ever made. My $50 Koss cans sound light years better. But nothing beats hearing music played through good bookshelf or floor speakers driven by clean power from a decent receiver.

/lawn yada yada yada
//fondly recall the days when all the stereo manufacturers (Sherwood, Pioneer, Marantz, etc.) advertised gear in magazines


If you have a DVD player connected to your receiver, can't you play CDs on it? Or is the sound terrible compared to a CD-player? (I'm not an audiophile, but I think every DVD player these days plays music CDs too).
 
2014-08-26 02:10:31 PM  

HighZoolander: That graphic sucked.

I shouldn't have to try to read labels that are jumping around and changing values every second.

Reading is hard enough without having to do it fast.



If only there was a place that could help with that, something like the Derek Zoolander School For Kids That Can't Read Good And Want To Do Other Things Good Too
 
2014-08-26 02:21:37 PM  

HighZoolander: That graphic sucked.

I shouldn't have to try to read labels that are jumping around and changing values every second.

Reading is hard enough without having to do it fast.


When I start scrolling down the page on my phone, gifs pause their animation, so I just touched the screen while I was looking at each graph and then let it move on to the next frame when I was done looking at it.

But yeah, if I couldn't do that, it would have sucked.
 
2014-08-26 02:23:47 PM  

busy chillin': HighZoolander: That graphic sucked.

I shouldn't have to try to read labels that are jumping around and changing values every second.

Reading is hard enough without having to do it fast.


If only there was a place that could help with that, something like the Derek Zoolander School For Kids That Can't Read Good And Want To Do Other Things Good Too


There can be only one school for kids that can't read good and want to do other things good too.
 
2014-08-26 02:24:30 PM  
Well, that was badly done. Is it really that hard to make sure your frames all match? And how about slowing it down so we can actually digest the information?
 
2014-08-26 02:34:09 PM  

BrianGriffin: As someone who has been through all the formats (I'm 60): 45s, LPs, 8-tracks, cassettes, CDs, mp3s, loss-less downloads, etc., I am surprised at how large the percentage of music sales is for downloads. I only buy isolated songs on iTunes (mostly stuff from the 60s or 70s). I still like having a product in my hand, including the liner notes, etc. But the biggest reason I still prefer CDs is that I enjoy listening on component stereo systems. No plugging an iPod into a i-Dock for me. The sad thing is that it's getting more and more difficult to buy middle of the road hi-fi gear these days. When my Technics 5-disc carrousel bit the dust about 6 years ago, I had to resort to buying a used unit on eBay. No one, brick and mortar or online, was selling good CD players, except for VERY high end stuff (we're talking single disc players for 2 grand). I still have my Kyocera receiver that I bought new in 1985 and it still works great. I just don't see the point of listening to music on (a) computer speakers no matter how good, (b) ear buds, or (c) those ridiculously over-priced POS "beats" by Dr Dre, which may be the worst headphones ever made. My $50 Koss cans sound light years better. But nothing beats hearing music played through good bookshelf or floor speakers driven by clean power from a decent receiver.

/lawn yada yada yada
//fondly recall the days when all the stereo manufacturers (Sherwood, Pioneer, Marantz, etc.) advertised gear in magazines


I read an article a few months ago claiming modern music is mixed to listen on tiny ear buds.
 
2014-08-26 02:36:58 PM  

btraz70: The 13 year old Corrola I just bought for a work car only has cassette.  Luckily I found some tapes at an estate sale recently!  It's either Elvis or the Monkees for my daily commute (radio broken)

/not your steppin stone


I had a Walkman hooked up to 2 battery powered external speakers; it worked okay.
 
2014-08-26 02:38:18 PM  
Ahhhhh 2002. The year everyone had one of these in their cars, filled to the brim:

i223.photobucket.com
 
2014-08-26 02:38:38 PM  

mcreadyblue: BrianGriffin: As someone who has been through all the formats (I'm 60): 45s, LPs, 8-tracks, cassettes, CDs, mp3s, loss-less downloads, etc., I am surprised at how large the percentage of music sales is for downloads. I only buy isolated songs on iTunes (mostly stuff from the 60s or 70s). I still like having a product in my hand, including the liner notes, etc. But the biggest reason I still prefer CDs is that I enjoy listening on component stereo systems. No plugging an iPod into a i-Dock for me. The sad thing is that it's getting more and more difficult to buy middle of the road hi-fi gear these days. When my Technics 5-disc carrousel bit the dust about 6 years ago, I had to resort to buying a used unit on eBay. No one, brick and mortar or online, was selling good CD players, except for VERY high end stuff (we're talking single disc players for 2 grand). I still have my Kyocera receiver that I bought new in 1985 and it still works great. I just don't see the point of listening to music on (a) computer speakers no matter how good, (b) ear buds, or (c) those ridiculously over-priced POS "beats" by Dr Dre, which may be the worst headphones ever made. My $50 Koss cans sound light years better. But nothing beats hearing music played through good bookshelf or floor speakers driven by clean power from a decent receiver.

/lawn yada yada yada
//fondly recall the days when all the stereo manufacturers (Sherwood, Pioneer, Marantz, etc.) advertised gear in magazines

I read an article a few months ago claiming modern music is mixed to listen on tiny ear buds.


Pete Townshend said he wanted the Who to sound good on transistor radio speakers.
 
2014-08-26 02:41:22 PM  

BrianGriffin: As someone who has been through all the formats (I'm 60): 45s, LPs, 8-tracks, cassettes, CDs, mp3s, loss-less downloads, etc., I am surprised at how large the percentage of music sales is for downloads. I only buy isolated songs on iTunes (mostly stuff from the 60s or 70s). I still like having a product in my hand, including the liner notes, etc. But the biggest reason I still prefer CDs is that I enjoy listening on component stereo systems. No plugging an iPod into a i-Dock for me. The sad thing is that it's getting more and more difficult to buy middle of the road hi-fi gear these days. When my Technics 5-disc carrousel bit the dust about 6 years ago, I had to resort to buying a used unit on eBay. No one, brick and mortar or online, was selling good CD players, except for VERY high end stuff (we're talking single disc players for 2 grand). I still have my Kyocera receiver that I bought new in 1985 and it still works great. I just don't see the point of listening to music on (a) computer speakers no matter how good, (b) ear buds, or (c) those ridiculously over-priced POS "beats" by Dr Dre, which may be the worst headphones ever made. My $50 Koss cans sound light years better. But nothing beats hearing music played through good bookshelf or floor speakers driven by clean power from a decent receiver.

/lawn yada yada yada
//fondly recall the days when all the stereo manufacturers (Sherwood, Pioneer, Marantz, etc.) advertised gear in magazines


CSB: In my 'Man Cave' (gods I hate that term!) I have a 7.1 Onkyo receiver with some decent Polk middle, side and rear channel speakers with some Infinitys for the fronts and a Pioneer powered sub, all bought 2nd hand at garage sales and from friends who have upgraded over the years.  I have less than $300 in the whole system and it will shake the whole house if I let it.  I have most of my music in flac form on my computer out there and it is hooked up to the system, but I also have my turntable, cd, TV and cassette players hooked up as well.  I also user this system to mix tracks I've recorded.  I guess my point is, other than bragging on my middle of the road system that Rocks!, that you can put a pretty decent system together over time by shopping garage sales and thrift shops.
 
2014-08-26 02:49:20 PM  

Billy Liar: mcreadyblue: BrianGriffin: As someone who has been through all the formats (I'm 60): 45s, LPs, 8-tracks, cassettes, CDs, mp3s, loss-less downloads, etc., I am surprised at how large the percentage of music sales is for downloads. I only buy isolated songs on iTunes (mostly stuff from the 60s or 70s). I still like having a product in my hand, including the liner notes, etc. But the biggest reason I still prefer CDs is that I enjoy listening on component stereo systems. No plugging an iPod into a i-Dock for me. The sad thing is that it's getting more and more difficult to buy middle of the road hi-fi gear these days. When my Technics 5-disc carrousel bit the dust about 6 years ago, I had to resort to buying a used unit on eBay. No one, brick and mortar or online, was selling good CD players, except for VERY high end stuff (we're talking single disc players for 2 grand). I still have my Kyocera receiver that I bought new in 1985 and it still works great. I just don't see the point of listening to music on (a) computer speakers no matter how good, (b) ear buds, or (c) those ridiculously over-priced POS "beats" by Dr Dre, which may be the worst headphones ever made. My $50 Koss cans sound light years better. But nothing beats hearing music played through good bookshelf or floor speakers driven by clean power from a decent receiver.

/lawn yada yada yada
//fondly recall the days when all the stereo manufacturers (Sherwood, Pioneer, Marantz, etc.) advertised gear in magazines

I read an article a few months ago claiming modern music is mixed to listen on tiny ear buds.

Pete Townshend said he wanted the Who to sound good on transistor radio speakers.


Berry Gordy mixed Motown singles so they would pop on transistor radios and shiatty car speakers of the day.
 
2014-08-26 02:54:09 PM  
Curious, has the change in formats essentially eliminated car stereo theft?

/lmgtfy
 
2014-08-26 02:54:35 PM  

HighZoolander: If you have a DVD player connected to your receiver, can't you play CDs on it? Or is the sound terrible compared to a CD-player?


Yes you can.  And it should sound the same.


BrianGriffin: But the biggest reason I still prefer CDs is that I enjoy listening on component stereo systems.


You can attach almost any portable music player or smartphone to your receiver or preamp by using a headphone to RCA adapter.  Some newer smartphone models even include HDMI (PCM) output.

If you have a home theater media PC, then you probably have your choice of headphone, HDMI and some sort of SPDIF.

I have a nice 5 disc Carver CD player in my garage.  Once I get the belt for the tray fixed, it is going onto eBay.

In some ways, ripping a CD to a PC is superior to playing it on a traditional CD player because software like Exact Audio Copy can re-read a bad sector as many times as it takes to get a good read.  It can then compare your rip to an online database to see if your CD/DVD/BR drive was honest about ripping cleanly.  A traditional CD player has to deal with an error on-the-fly, which might produce a blip or a skip.
 
2014-08-26 03:08:07 PM  

BrianGriffin: As someone who has been through all the formats (I'm 60): 45s, LPs, 8-tracks, cassettes, CDs, mp3s, loss-less downloads, etc., I am surprised at how large the percentage of music sales is for downloads. I only buy isolated songs on iTunes (mostly stuff from the 60s or 70s). I still like having a product in my hand, including the liner notes, etc. But the biggest reason I still prefer CDs is that I enjoy listening on component stereo systems. No plugging an iPod into a i-Dock for me. The sad thing is that it's getting more and more difficult to buy middle of the road hi-fi gear these days. When my Technics 5-disc carrousel bit the dust about 6 years ago, I had to resort to buying a used unit on eBay. No one, brick and mortar or online, was selling good CD players, except for VERY high end stuff (we're talking single disc players for 2 grand). I still have my Kyocera receiver that I bought new in 1985 and it still works great. I just don't see the point of listening to music on (a) computer speakers no matter how good, (b) ear buds, or (c) those ridiculously over-priced POS "beats" by Dr Dre, which may be the worst headphones ever made. My $50 Koss cans sound light years better. But nothing beats hearing music played through good bookshelf or floor speakers driven by clean power from a decent receiver.

/lawn yada yada yada
//fondly recall the days when all the stereo manufacturers (Sherwood, Pioneer, Marantz, etc.) advertised gear in magazines


I have one of these, sounds amazing. Bluetooth, AppleTV, and also has an Aux In.

http://www.harmankardon.com/estore/hk/us/products/Aura/AURA_HK_US?sk uI d=HKAURAAPBLKAM_HK_US
 
2014-08-26 03:11:27 PM  

notto: btraz70: The 13 year old Corrola I just bought for a work car only has cassette.  Luckily I found some tapes at an estate sale recently!  It's either Elvis or the Monkees for my daily commute (radio broken)

/not your steppin stone

[img.fark.net image 128x128]


I have about 8 of those in a box in my garage.
 
2014-08-26 03:13:10 PM  

Billy Liar: mcreadyblue: BrianGriffin: As someone who has been through all the formats (I'm 60): 45s, LPs, 8-tracks, cassettes, CDs, mp3s, loss-less downloads, etc., I am surprised at how large the percentage of music sales is for downloads. I only buy isolated songs on iTunes (mostly stuff from the 60s or 70s). I still like having a product in my hand, including the liner notes, etc. But the biggest reason I still prefer CDs is that I enjoy listening on component stereo systems. No plugging an iPod into a i-Dock for me. The sad thing is that it's getting more and more difficult to buy middle of the road hi-fi gear these days. When my Technics 5-disc carrousel bit the dust about 6 years ago, I had to resort to buying a used unit on eBay. No one, brick and mortar or online, was selling good CD players, except for VERY high end stuff (we're talking single disc players for 2 grand). I still have my Kyocera receiver that I bought new in 1985 and it still works great. I just don't see the point of listening to music on (a) computer speakers no matter how good, (b) ear buds, or (c) those ridiculously over-priced POS "beats" by Dr Dre, which may be the worst headphones ever made. My $50 Koss cans sound light years better. But nothing beats hearing music played through good bookshelf or floor speakers driven by clean power from a decent receiver.

/lawn yada yada yada
//fondly recall the days when all the stereo manufacturers (Sherwood, Pioneer, Marantz, etc.) advertised gear in magazines

I read an article a few months ago claiming modern music is mixed to listen on tiny ear buds.

Pete Townshend said he wanted the Who to sound good on transistor radio speakers.


Didn't the Who invent quadraphonic stereo?
 
2014-08-26 03:18:41 PM  

TNel: LOL anti-skip god did having a cd player without that meant you might as well throw it away.


 Ahh yes, the early 90's. I always put my portable CD player on a cushion made of fast food bags between my bucket seats to keep it from skipping. It worked pretty damn good too. The first CD I bought was Ministry's The Mind Is A Terrible Thing To Taste and it was the only CD in my car for months and months.
 
2014-08-26 03:20:00 PM  

mcreadyblue: Billy Liar: mcreadyblue: BrianGriffin: As someone who has been through all the formats (I'm 60): 45s, LPs, 8-tracks, cassettes, CDs, mp3s, loss-less downloads, etc., I am surprised at how large the percentage of music sales is for downloads. I only buy isolated songs on iTunes (mostly stuff from the 60s or 70s). I still like having a product in my hand, including the liner notes, etc. But the biggest reason I still prefer CDs is that I enjoy listening on component stereo systems. No plugging an iPod into a i-Dock for me. The sad thing is that it's getting more and more difficult to buy middle of the road hi-fi gear these days. When my Technics 5-disc carrousel bit the dust about 6 years ago, I had to resort to buying a used unit on eBay. No one, brick and mortar or online, was selling good CD players, except for VERY high end stuff (we're talking single disc players for 2 grand). I still have my Kyocera receiver that I bought new in 1985 and it still works great. I just don't see the point of listening to music on (a) computer speakers no matter how good, (b) ear buds, or (c) those ridiculously over-priced POS "beats" by Dr Dre, which may be the worst headphones ever made. My $50 Koss cans sound light years better. But nothing beats hearing music played through good bookshelf or floor speakers driven by clean power from a decent receiver.

/lawn yada yada yada
//fondly recall the days when all the stereo manufacturers (Sherwood, Pioneer, Marantz, etc.) advertised gear in magazines

I read an article a few months ago claiming modern music is mixed to listen on tiny ear buds.

Pete Townshend said he wanted the Who to sound good on transistor radio speakers.

Didn't the Who invent quadraphonic stereo?


Part of me wants to say...yes?    B^D
 
2014-08-26 03:25:54 PM  
Most my collection is still on cassette tapes. I never got around to converting the bulk of my collection to CDs much less digital and I've never actually owned any kind of digital music player. I still have a few LPs too.
 
2014-08-26 03:30:41 PM  

BrianGriffin: I am surprised at how large the percentage of music sales is for downloads


as someone who just spent $90 on iTunes today (downloaded through my phone, of all places!), consider this:  my car has the "stereophile" stereo with an 8" powered subwoofer.  The phone/computer can plug into the surround sound (either via 1/8" or SPDIF) and power that, and my little bluetooth cube can plug into the 2.1 amp in the basement so I can bump the bass while working out (theoretically... anyways!).

/The Bug's new album dropped yesterday. GET IT.
 
2014-08-26 03:36:58 PM  

mekkab: BrianGriffin: I am surprised at how large the percentage of music sales is for downloads

as someone who just spent $90 on iTunes today (downloaded through my phone, of all places!), consider this:  my car has the "stereophile" stereo with an 8" powered subwoofer.  The phone/computer can plug into the surround sound (either via 1/8" or SPDIF) and power that, and my little bluetooth cube can plug into the 2.1 amp in the basement so I can bump the bass while working out (theoretically... anyways!).

/The Bug's new album dropped yesterday. GET IT.


That's 10 months of Xbox Music or Google Music service.  If you buy music that much it would be better to just subscribe.
 
2014-08-26 03:51:44 PM  
yes, we used to mix our records for car stereos in the 70s.  Also, every studio had a pair of cheap speakers to test your mixes on. The mucho expensive would give you tons of bass, but when you heard it back on the cheapos, no bottom end.
Mixing is tough.
 
2014-08-26 04:01:29 PM  

Billy Liar: mcreadyblue: Billy Liar: mcreadyblue: BrianGriffin: As someone who has been through all the formats (I'm 60): 45s, LPs, 8-tracks, cassettes, CDs, mp3s, loss-less downloads, etc., I am surprised at how large the percentage of music sales is for downloads. I only buy isolated songs on iTunes (mostly stuff from the 60s or 70s). I still like having a product in my hand, including the liner notes, etc. But the biggest reason I still prefer CDs is that I enjoy listening on component stereo systems. No plugging an iPod into a i-Dock for me. The sad thing is that it's getting more and more difficult to buy middle of the road hi-fi gear these days. When my Technics 5-disc carrousel bit the dust about 6 years ago, I had to resort to buying a used unit on eBay. No one, brick and mortar or online, was selling good CD players, except for VERY high end stuff (we're talking single disc players for 2 grand). I still have my Kyocera receiver that I bought new in 1985 and it still works great. I just don't see the point of listening to music on (a) computer speakers no matter how good, (b) ear buds, or (c) those ridiculously over-priced POS "beats" by Dr Dre, which may be the worst headphones ever made. My $50 Koss cans sound light years better. But nothing beats hearing music played through good bookshelf or floor speakers driven by clean power from a decent receiver.

/lawn yada yada yada
//fondly recall the days when all the stereo manufacturers (Sherwood, Pioneer, Marantz, etc.) advertised gear in magazines

I read an article a few months ago claiming modern music is mixed to listen on tiny ear buds.

Pete Townshend said he wanted the Who to sound good on transistor radio speakers.

Didn't the Who invent quadraphonic stereo?

Part of me wants to say...yes?    B^D


According to a college here at work, Pink Floyd was the first during the Piper at the Gates of Dawn concerts.
 
2014-08-26 04:09:47 PM  

TNel: That's 10 months of Xbox Music or Google Music service. If you buy music that much it would be better to just subscribe.


possibly!

do those services have the following bands?: Noisem,  Carcass, Exhumed, Machine Head, Children of Bodom, The Black Dhalia Murder, and Suicide Silence?  (and of course, THe Bug?)

For all the metal/grindcore, I'm boning up for two upcoming shows (one in October, one in November).

And as for The Bug, well... he's The Bug.

/usually I listen to jungletrain.net and buy drum-n-bass direct from the producers on bandcamp.com... just to support the really really tiny guys.
 
2014-08-26 04:15:32 PM  
But all those formats are worthless without Monster Cable.
 
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