If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Daily Mail)   Delta jet has to make emergency stop in Ireland as number of passengers onboard increases by one   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 96
    More: Amusing  
•       •       •

6495 clicks; posted to Main » on 25 Aug 2014 at 11:50 AM (4 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



96 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2014-08-25 08:18:33 AM
Technically....
 
2014-08-25 08:20:56 AM
Smuggling an unregistered passenger.

I think that should involve heavy jail time.
 
2014-08-25 08:57:54 AM
Just seems selfish to fly that late in the third term. But apparently Delta is ok with that:

Delta Airlines has no restrictions and does not require a medical certificate, but it encourages pregnant women to discuss air travel with a doctor before booking a ticket.
 
2014-08-25 09:05:42 AM
I'm sure she was charged for the additional carry off piece.
 
2014-08-25 09:43:36 AM
Just as long as she keeps the stupid thing quite on the next leg.

/dnrtfa
 
2014-08-25 11:02:48 AM
Baby didn't have a passport.
 
2014-08-25 11:51:48 AM
So if a plane is flying from the Netherlands to the US and the birth takes place in Ireland, where do they bury the survivors?
 
2014-08-25 11:53:02 AM

stpauler: Just seems selfish to fly that late in the third term. But apparently Delta is ok with that:

Delta Airlines has no restrictions and does not require a medical certificate, but it encourages pregnant women to discuss air travel with a doctor before booking a ticket.


It would be foolish of them to try and do anything to stop it. Just think of the backlash against them- "Delta didn't let me board even though my due date is in a week and now my husband just back from Afghanistan couldn't see his son being born!" People love to do inadvisable things and then it's the company that gets the bad PR when the story is misreported later on.
 
2014-08-25 11:55:18 AM
ts1.mm.bing.net
No ticket
 
2014-08-25 11:57:48 AM
2.bp.blogspot.com

Ohh, get that, would you, Deirdre?

All right, Mum.
 
2014-08-25 11:58:21 AM
Hmm.. if it wasn't for the factthat IA want to be close to my doctor, a plane ticket might do the trick you say?

/Due date: 8/26
//First two were a week early
///GAWDAMMITSOMUCH
/V SLASHIES
 
2014-08-25 11:58:30 AM
Wasn't there an urban legend about free airfare for life if you're born in the air? Kid missed out on that one, I suppose (It wasn't true anyway).

Anyway, kid gets Irish citizenship out of the deal, I suppose.

stpauler: Just seems selfish to fly that late in the third term. But apparently Delta is ok with that:

Delta Airlines has no restrictions and does not require a medical certificate, but it encourages pregnant women to discuss air travel with a doctor before booking a ticket.


More importantly: "The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists said there is no significant risk associated directly with air travel during pregnancy, even at advanced gestation.
The college said there is no evidence that flying causes early labour or a woman's water to break."
 
2014-08-25 12:00:41 PM
FTFA: Delta Airlines has no restrictions and does not require a medical certificate, but it encourages pregnant women to discuss air travel with a doctor before booking a ticket.


Yet.

/New hotness: Irish anchor babies?
 
2014-08-25 12:04:38 PM
Better than being born in Amsterdam I guess.
 
2014-08-25 12:05:21 PM
Being Delta, they probably made them buy another ticket
 
2014-08-25 12:05:24 PM
Any word on the kid's nut allergy status yet?
 
2014-08-25 12:05:57 PM

cptjeff: Wasn't there an urban legend about free airfare for life if you're born in the air? Kid missed out on that one, I suppose (It wasn't true anyway).

Anyway, kid gets Irish citizenship out of the deal, I suppose.

stpauler: Just seems selfish to fly that late in the third term. But apparently Delta is ok with that:

Delta Airlines has no restrictions and does not require a medical certificate, but it encourages pregnant women to discuss air travel with a doctor before booking a ticket.

More importantly: "The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists said there is no significant risk associated directly with air travel during pregnancy, even at advanced gestation.
The college said there is no evidence that flying causes early labour or a woman's water to break."


So, out of curiosity, how many women who are that close to their due date actually go flying around in airplanes?
Because if air pressure farks with your eardrums, then I'm fairly certain the physics involved could mess with how effaced or dilated your cervix is.

(No study undertaken because of a lack of sample to choose from != evidence to the contrary)
 
2014-08-25 12:06:00 PM
I'll bet the airline charges a huge fee for that sort of thing.
 
2014-08-25 12:06:35 PM
You'd figure with the ability to accept credit cards mid-flight they didn't even need to land at all, could have just charged the extra ticket right then and there.  What a waste of time.
 
2014-08-25 12:10:22 PM
My mother's never flown. But then she's never not been pregnant.
 
2014-08-25 12:13:41 PM
Anyone like me who has had a pregnant wife (4x) you have no idea when its gonna happen.  Get over it.
 
2014-08-25 12:14:52 PM

smunns: Anyone like me who has had a pregnant wife (4x) you have no idea when its gonna happen.  Get over it.


NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!

PLEASE!
LIE TO ME! TELL ME THE DUE DATE MEANS SOMETHING!!

I need to believe!!!!!1!
 
2014-08-25 12:15:44 PM

stpauler: Just seems selfish to fly that late in the third term. But apparently Delta is ok with that:

Delta Airlines has no restrictions and does not require a medical certificate, but it encourages pregnant women to discuss air travel with a doctor before booking a ticket.


Doctor's say not to.
 
2014-08-25 12:18:24 PM

cptjeff: Anyway, kid gets Irish citizenship out of the deal, I suppose.


Probably not. At least one parent has to be a legal resident in Ireland although the rules are a little murky to me regarding British citizens who aren't residents. The US is actually fairly rare in that anyone born there is a citizen no matter the circumstances.
 
2014-08-25 12:21:14 PM
Somehow, I believe that conceiving a baby at 30,000 feet would be much more enjoyable than delivering one.
 
2014-08-25 12:24:26 PM

To The Escape Zeppelin!: cptjeff: Anyway, kid gets Irish citizenship out of the deal, I suppose.

Probably not. At least one parent has to be a legal resident in Ireland although the rules are a little murky to me regarding British citizens who aren't residents. The US is actually fairly rare in that anyone born there is a citizen no matter the circumstances.


Had the kid waited until they landed in Atlanta and it would have been a US citizen.

/Then again, Delta planes are US flagged airliners, so does that mean the kid was born in US jurisdiction?
 
2014-08-25 12:25:06 PM

nocturnal001: stpauler: Just seems selfish to fly that late in the third term. But apparently Delta is ok with that:

Delta Airlines has no restrictions and does not require a medical certificate, but it encourages pregnant women to discuss air travel with a doctor before booking a ticket.

Doctor's say not to.


Which doctors?

FTFA: "The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists said there is no significant risk associated directly with air travel during pregnancy, even at advanced gestation.
The college said there is no evidence that flying causes early labour or a woman's water to break."


Because these ones seem ok with it.
 
2014-08-25 12:25:42 PM
Where do they bury the survivors?
 
2014-08-25 12:26:21 PM

wxboy: Baby didn't have a passport.


Baby is also a citizen of Delta (Population: 1), since that is where it was born
 
2014-08-25 12:27:27 PM

tlars699: cptjeff: Wasn't there an urban legend about free airfare for life if you're born in the air? Kid missed out on that one, I suppose (It wasn't true anyway).

Anyway, kid gets Irish citizenship out of the deal, I suppose.

stpauler: Just seems selfish to fly that late in the third term. But apparently Delta is ok with that:

Delta Airlines has no restrictions and does not require a medical certificate, but it encourages pregnant women to discuss air travel with a doctor before booking a ticket.

More importantly: "The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists said there is no significant risk associated directly with air travel during pregnancy, even at advanced gestation.
The college said there is no evidence that flying causes early labour or a woman's water to break."

So, out of curiosity, how many women who are that close to their due date actually go flying around in airplanes?
Because if air pressure farks with your eardrums, then I'm fairly certain the physics involved could mess with how effaced or dilated your cervix is.

(No study undertaken because of a lack of sample to choose from != evidence to the contrary)


I'm fairly certain that the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists would take that kind of thing into account. It's a rough equivalent to the American Academy of Pediatrics- that is to say, their positions are the standard that every doctor in the UK is going to go by.

Flying doesn't actually do anything to your eardrums, popping is entirely safe and normal. Not to mention, the cervix is a completely different structure than the eardrum. Radically different function, radically different level of sensitivity to pressure (the eardrum is an issue because it's designed to be sensitive to the tiniest changes in pressure- that's how you hear), radically different muscle strength. And the eardrum has air on both sides, the cervix is holding in a liquid, so the pressure differential it has to deal with is already much greater.

Does living on a mountain send you into labor earlier? Do people tell you that you shouldn't live in Colorado if pregnant? If that's not an issue, neither would be airline pressurization.
 
2014-08-25 12:27:52 PM

cptjeff: Wasn't there an urban legend about free airfare for life if you're born in the air? Kid missed out on that one, I suppose (It wasn't true anyway).

Anyway, kid gets Irish citizenship out of the deal, I suppose.


Is there supposed to be an upside to that?
 
2014-08-25 12:36:07 PM

Hospitaller: wxboy: Baby didn't have a passport.

Baby is also a citizen of Delta (Population: 1), since that is where it was born


Baby was born in an Irish hospital. The women went into labor on the plane, but the birth came after landing.


To The Escape Zeppelin!: cptjeff: Anyway, kid gets Irish citizenship out of the deal, I suppose.

Probably not. At least one parent has to be a legal resident in Ireland although the rules are a little murky to me regarding British citizens who aren't residents. The US is actually fairly rare in that anyone born there is a citizen no matter the circumstances.


It's not rare at all, most countries have some form of birth provision, some stronger than others. Though I just checked, and Ireland's is fairly limited these days, so this kid probably doesn't get citizenship, depending on the background of the parents. Automatic citizen if you can't claim citizenship anywhere else, and you get a claim to it if one parent is an Irish or UK citizen, or a current resident of the Republic or Northern Ireland, or a legal resident for 3 out of 4 years before the birth.

That's a fairly recent change- before 2005, anyone born in Ireland would either automatically be a citizen or would be entitled to claim citizenship if they wanted it.
 
2014-08-25 12:37:01 PM

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: cptjeff: Wasn't there an urban legend about free airfare for life if you're born in the air? Kid missed out on that one, I suppose (It wasn't true anyway).

Anyway, kid gets Irish citizenship out of the deal, I suppose.

Is there supposed to be an upside to that?


Tax dodge? Gets to travel to places that don't accept US passports?
 
2014-08-25 12:40:22 PM
The baby was stuffed with cocaine.
 
2014-08-25 12:42:54 PM
Seems to me like it's not about the danger of flying late term, it's more like "maybe being on land is a good idea since you don't know when the show will decide to start, and there goes your whole trip anyway if it picks this week."

But you know what they say about common sense.
 
2014-08-25 12:52:45 PM

ronnie spleen: Any word on the kid's nut allergy status yet?


OK, I larfed
 
2014-08-25 12:53:27 PM
They weren't flying another mile without getting airfare for the new arrival.
 
2014-08-25 12:54:56 PM
Soon airlines will be tacking on mandatory midwifery fees to every ticket purchase.
 
2014-08-25 12:57:14 PM
My dad was an OBGYN and got the "is it safe to fly" question a lot.  One night I heard a conversation in his office go something like this:

Husband: "My wife is due in a few weeks and we have to go (somewhere), is it OK for her to fly?"
Dad: "Yes, yes, it's perfectly safe to fly"
Wife: "Doctor, are you sure it's safe?"
Dad: "Yes, it's perfectly safe.  You and the baby will be fine"
Husband: "Doctor, so what you're telling us is that it's OK to fly"
Dad (clearly irritated):  YES.  YES YOU CAN FLY.  AS LONG AS YOU'RE ON A PLANE, YOU CAN FLY.
 
2014-08-25 01:07:06 PM

cptjeff: Hospitaller: wxboy: Baby didn't have a passport.

Baby is also a citizen of Delta (Population: 1), since that is where it was born

Baby was born in an Irish hospital. The women went into labor on the plane, but the birth came after landing.


To The Escape Zeppelin!: cptjeff: Anyway, kid gets Irish citizenship out of the deal, I suppose.

Probably not. At least one parent has to be a legal resident in Ireland although the rules are a little murky to me regarding British citizens who aren't residents. The US is actually fairly rare in that anyone born there is a citizen no matter the circumstances.

It's not rare at all, most countries have some form of birth provision, some stronger than others. Though I just checked, and Ireland's is fairly limited these days, so this kid probably doesn't get citizenship, depending on the background of the parents. Automatic citizen if you can't claim citizenship anywhere else, and you get a claim to it if one parent is an Irish or UK citizen, or a current resident of the Republic or Northern Ireland, or a legal resident for 3 out of 4 years before the birth.

That's a fairly recent change- before 2005, anyone born in Ireland would either automatically be a citizen or would be entitled to claim citizenship if they wanted it.


Since Ireland's change, no European country has unconditional jus soli, and only the US and Canada have it among countries the International Monetary Fund defines as advanced economies.  A few still maintain a lesser version with restrictions - primarily to those who would otherwise be stateless, or requiring the person ALSO have some blood/heritage connection, which is really more jus sanguinis, even if they have a lesser set of requirements on heritage for those born within the country.  Generally, it's just the Americas with significant forms of jus soli.  That newer version of Ireland's rule is about as relaxed as most of the rest of the world gets with that (and is still claimed as having 'restricted jus soli').  The sort the other poster was mentioning - citizenship just by giving birth there - is rare.
 
2014-08-25 01:07:54 PM

tlars699: Hmm.. if it wasn't for the factthat IA want to be close to my doctor, a plane ticket might do the trick you say?

/Due date: 8/26
//First two were a week early
///GAWDAMMITSOMUCH
/V SLASHIES


Good luck. (We're all counting on you)

My #3 is 16 months old now. You're going to be busy... ;-)
 
2014-08-25 01:13:42 PM
Inconsiderate parents.
 
2014-08-25 01:20:36 PM

smunns: Anyone like me who has had a pregnant wife (4x) you have no idea when its gonna happen.  Get over it.


While it's true you can never know the exact date and time unless you're doing a planned C-section, I'd venture to say it's far, FAR more likely you'd suddenly go into labor and have a child at say, 8.5 months than 3.

My wife ruled out vacations and air travel when she hit 7 months. However unlikely, the possibility exists (especially on a transatlantic FFS) that you go into labor, have to deliver on the plane, and die of hemorrhaging before you can be shuttled to a hospital. Don't know the circumstances, but unless it was life or death, I'd say it's not the best plan to schedule long flights while that pregnant.
 
2014-08-25 01:32:14 PM
Came for the obligatory pic of Dr. Rumack and the woman with her feet in stirrups from Airplane!

/leaving disappointed
 
2014-08-25 01:35:12 PM

tlars699: cptjeff: Wasn't there an urban legend about free airfare for life if you're born in the air? Kid missed out on that one, I suppose (It wasn't true anyway).

Anyway, kid gets Irish citizenship out of the deal, I suppose.

stpauler: Just seems selfish to fly that late in the third term. But apparently Delta is ok with that:

Delta Airlines has no restrictions and does not require a medical certificate, but it encourages pregnant women to discuss air travel with a doctor before booking a ticket.

More importantly: "The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists said there is no significant risk associated directly with air travel during pregnancy, even at advanced gestation.
The college said there is no evidence that flying causes early labour or a woman's water to break."

So, out of curiosity, how many women who are that close to their due date actually go flying around in airplanes?
Because if air pressure farks with your eardrums, then I'm fairly certain the physics involved could mess with how effaced or dilated your cervix is.

(No study undertaken because of a lack of sample to choose from != evidence to the contrary)


If the cervix were really so delicate, pregnant women wouldn't be allowed to take the stairs, much less jog. Just think how much pressure a baby jostling up and down can generate - far more than air pressure changes in flight.

Luckily, our cervix is designed to hold a baby in, unlike our eardrums.
 
2014-08-25 01:35:58 PM
How was a woman nearly at full term allowed to board an international flight?

Congrats, lady - your kid now has Irish citizenship. (I think)
 
2014-08-25 01:40:29 PM
I was on a flight between Bangkok and Dhaka when a sprog was born.
 
2014-08-25 01:50:13 PM
Pretty risky for a woman that pregnant to be flying.  What if there had been complications?
 
2014-08-25 01:52:47 PM

cptjeff: Hospitaller: wxboy: Baby didn't have a passport.

Baby is also a citizen of Delta (Population: 1), since that is where it was born

Baby was born in an Irish hospital. The women went into labor on the plane, but the birth came after landing.


To The Escape Zeppelin!: cptjeff: Anyway, kid gets Irish citizenship out of the deal, I suppose.

Probably not. At least one parent has to be a legal resident in Ireland although the rules are a little murky to me regarding British citizens who aren't residents. The US is actually fairly rare in that anyone born there is a citizen no matter the circumstances.

It's not rare at all, most countries have some form of birth provision, some stronger than others. Though I just checked, and Ireland's is fairly limited these days, so this kid probably doesn't get citizenship, depending on the background of the parents. Automatic citizen if you can't claim citizenship anywhere else, and you get a claim to it if one parent is an Irish or UK citizen, or a current resident of the Republic or Northern Ireland, or a legal resident for 3 out of 4 years before the birth.

That's a fairly recent change- before 2005, anyone born in Ireland would either automatically be a citizen or would be entitled to claim citizenship if they wanted it.


My mother emigrated from Ireland to the US as a teenager, and she had dual-citizenship.

Therefore, all her children are eligible for Irish passports.  I've never gotten around to getting one for me,
but my brother has and it has served him well in his professional endeavors in Europe over the years.
 
2014-08-25 01:54:15 PM
yep--didnt pay the baby birth on board fee, so they had to have her removed
 
Displayed 50 of 96 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report