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(LA Times)   A suspect in the custody of the LAPD tells them that he has asthma and is having difficulty breathing. Police respond with an expert medical opinion: 'You can talk, so you can breathe.' Suspect dies in custody just to be contrary   (latimes.com) divider line 209
    More: Fail, Jorge Azucena, Los Angeles neighborhoods, crowd watching, LAPD, South Los Angeles  
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10676 clicks; posted to Main » on 25 Aug 2014 at 4:47 AM (35 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-08-24 10:55:11 PM  
FTA: "Nine officers and two sergeants are the subjects of ongoing internal investigations, while another sergeant under scrutiny recently retired, said Capt. Paul Snell, who commands the LAPD's Southwest Division, where the death occurred. "

Once the internal investigation is complete, I'm sure any officers found to be guilty of any wrongdoing will be docked several vacation days and receive a scolding.
 
2014-08-24 11:07:54 PM  
"I don't think this points to a culture of officers who don't care about people," Soboroff said.

...

When they arrived at the station, Azucena collapsed to his knees as he tried to get out of the patrol car, according to the reports. One officer told him "that he needed to act like a man and walk," according to the inspector general's report.


...

Whenever someone is taken into custody and brought to a station, LAPD rules require that the station's supervisor ask a series of questions before the suspect is placed in a detention cell.
One of the questions that must be asked and documented on a form is whether the person is ill or has any medical conditions needing attention.
According to the inspector general's report, the supervisor told investigators that he did ask Azucena if he was sick or injured and recorded his answer as "not responsive" on the form.


...

Although blood tests revealed methamphetamine in Azucena's system, county coroner's officials concluded from an autopsy that asthma probably killed him. They classified the death as an accident.

Accident my ass.  Azucena sounded like a piece of shiat.  But that doesn't really matter, the punishment for fleeing shouldn't be a slow, agonizing death.

 

Kuroboom: FTA: "Nine officers and two sergeants are the subjects of ongoing internal investigations, while another sergeant under scrutiny recently retired, said Capt. Paul Snell, who commands the LAPD's Southwest Division, where the death occurred. "

Once the internal investigation is complete, I'm sure any officers found to be guilty of any wrongdoing will be docked several vacation days and receive a scolding.


And their free-of-charge union lawyer will take the city to court, and force them to reinstate those vacation days with penalty interest and a lump sum for the pain and suffering the city's unjust decision caused the poor, poor officers.
 
2014-08-24 11:34:32 PM  
No rules, no accountability

/the police in this country are becoming the biggest threat to it
 
2014-08-24 11:58:27 PM  
Was he quite contrary?
 
2014-08-25 12:02:24 AM  
He showed them, now didn't he?
 
2014-08-25 12:11:23 AM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: No rules, no accountability

/the police in this country are becoming the biggest threat to it


Well, it's probably easier to commit "suicide by cop" these days, so at least there's that.
 
2014-08-25 12:14:13 AM  

criscodisco: MaudlinMutantMollusk: No rules, no accountability

/the police in this country are becoming the biggest threat to it

Well, it's probably easier to commit "suicide by cop" these days, so at least there's that.


You don't even need to be suicidal

/cuts out a step
 
2014-08-25 12:28:03 AM  
And no one will be held responsible.
 
2014-08-25 01:09:24 AM  
One more reason to stay far away from cops, IMHO.

/ and i say this as someone who has no criminal record, not even a traffic ticket....
 
2014-08-25 01:29:09 AM  
Can we get the guy who wrote the article about how cops just want to be our friends and we should just do what they ask and everything will be ok, can that guy do a follow up on how the dead guy in this case should just breathe like the cops said?
 
2014-08-25 01:35:33 AM  

mcmnky: Can we get the guy who wrote the article about how cops just want to be our friends and we should just do what they ask and everything will be ok, can that guy do a follow up on how the dead guy in this case should just breathe like the cops said?


Well, if his asthma had just followed the lawful orders of these law enforcement officers, then this wouldn't have happened. So I say he got what he deserved.

/no, I don't. really
 
2014-08-25 01:42:08 AM  
FTFA: "I don't think this points to a culture of officers who don't care about people," Steve Soboroff said. "But it's important that we make sure officers know they can follow their own moral compass and can feel comfortable speaking up in any situation if they have questions about what is going on."

How about the taxpayer-paid responsibility to call the farking ambulance for someone unable to take their own medication? I hereby nominate Steve Soboroff for a good round of cockpunching by Azucena's family. Let's see if he's moved by his "own moral compass and feels comfortable speaking up if he has any questions."
 
2014-08-25 01:46:12 AM  
Remember, these are just the few bad apples, in a whole department of good cops, who also did nothing while this guy was dying in a cell.
 
2014-08-25 02:08:32 AM  

Kuroboom: FTA: "Nine officers and two sergeants are the subjects of ongoing internal investigations, while another sergeant under scrutiny recently retired, said Capt. Paul Snell, who commands the LAPD's Southwest Division, where the death occurred. "

Once the internal investigation is complete, I'm sure any officers found to be guilty of any wrongdoing will be docked several vacation days and receive a scolding.


You will never know.  Thanks to California Supreme Court, the public has no right to know if an officer has faced any disciplinary actions.
"According to the ruling, an officer's disciplinary information may not be released by either the department or an independent review body, citing a police officer's right to privacy."
http://colorlines.com/archives/2011/08/deadly_secrets_how_california _l aw_has_shielded_oakland_police_violence.html

This was a big part of the Denny Thomas murder prosecution, where police were changed with beating a mentally ill homeless man to death.  IIRC, two of the officers were fired by the police department after the internal investigation, but the judge wouldn't let the prosecution enter the results of the investigation or paperwork involved with the firing be used in the case.  They were specifically trying to show that the defense's Use of Force expert was full of shiat when he said they were withing department guidelines (Which if so, probably would have meant they never would have been fired.  But we will never know.)
 
2014-08-25 04:56:00 AM  
What the hell is it with cops and ignoring people having medical or other issues? Or just leaving them in cells with no food or water? Or shooting them when they have no weapons? Hell, what the hell is it with cops period?

I never thought I would say this, but I miss the days of Rodney King, when the cops would just taser and beat people. It's gotten WORSE.
 
2014-08-25 04:59:33 AM  

adamatari: What the hell is it with cops and ignoring people having medical or other issues? Or just leaving them in cells with no food or water? Or shooting them when they have no weapons? Hell, what the hell is it with cops period?

I never thought I would say this, but I miss the days of Rodney King, when the cops would just taser and beat people. It's gotten WORSE.


img.fark.net
 
2014-08-25 05:01:17 AM  

Angela Lansbury's Merkin: You will never know. Thanks to California Supreme Court, the public has no right to know if an officer has faced any disciplinary actions.


I think that there is also a similar rule regarding the U.S. Fifth Amendment: Cops are required by law to answer the questions that come up during some kinds of investigations as to their conduct (no idea whether in this case).  As a result of being compelled by a government, I believe their testimony at these hearings is protected from being used against them by the Fifth Amendment--in other words, the Fifth Amendment applied in reverse.  Public disclosure would undermine that right through jury tainting.  Any testimony later, outside the hearings, is not protected.

/This is just what I heard once; consider it very unreliable information, but a possible cause of what's going on... >.<
 
2014-08-25 05:01:19 AM  

Somacandra: FTFA: "I don't think this points to a culture of officers who don't care about people," Steve Soboroff said. "But it's important that we make sure officers know they can follow their own moral compass and can feel comfortable speaking up in any situation if they have questions about what is going on."

How about the taxpayer-paid responsibility to call the farking ambulance for someone unable to take their own medication? I hereby nominate Steve Soboroff for a good round of cockpunching by Azucena's family. Let's see if he's moved by his "own moral compass and feels comfortable speaking up if he has any questions."


I'm pretty sure they were following their own moral compass; they didn't give a shiat.
 
2014-08-25 05:02:06 AM  
Sheesh what is wrong with all you cop haters? The pillowcase does not fit, you must acquit.

/ just a little good cop,bad cop - nothing to see here
 
2014-08-25 05:07:32 AM  
I live across the street from a cop.

/she be hot.
 
2014-08-25 05:14:40 AM  
Azucena doesn't sound black.
 
2014-08-25 05:18:34 AM  

Guilty_plea_bargain: Azucena doesn't sound black.


Sure. But he was probably brown. Same thing
 
2014-08-25 05:18:58 AM  
Although blood tests revealed methamphetamine in Azucena's system

As someone who has been to the ER on meth because of an asthma attack I'm getting kick. Not saying the meth caused it, and I wasn't being chased by the cops, but it's quite unnerving to overhear one of the nurses comment that they've never seen an oxygen blood level as low as yours.
 
2014-08-25 05:21:18 AM  
So how many "isolated incidents" must we endure before we have systemic problem with police brutality and unaccountability in America?
 
2014-08-25 05:21:52 AM  
Let Asthmatic Perpetrators Die
 
2014-08-25 05:31:20 AM  
I wonder. Do cops become assholes *after* becoming cops? Or are assholes drawn to law enforcement?

Prolly academic as it ends up the same way.
 
2014-08-25 05:31:24 AM  
I was very disturbed to learn yesterday that comprehensive records are not kept- at either the national, state, or local levels- of the number or nature of fatal interactions that citizens have with the police.  Apparently these are even un- or under-reported by the media, who forgo accurate reporting of these incidents out of fear of losing police departments as their sources.

Since the recent spate of blue-on-not-blue violence, however, there has been a crowd-sourced effort to begin a database of these incidents.

For anyone interested in helping or learning more, I highly suggest checking out http://www.fatalencounters.org/.
 
2014-08-25 05:34:46 AM  
FTFA "There should not be any question that when somebody in custody is heard to say 'I cannot breathe,' the officers should promptly call for an ambulance," said Robert Saltzman

Uh, no.  They have nurses in jail.  No doubt they should have checked with nurse.  Big clue for life threatening asthma patients is a rescue inhaler.  They usually request the inhaler.  Any request for regular prescription medication such as insulin should automatically and immediately flag an evaluation.  Claiming to have an untreated medical condition, not so much.  Lots of people catch asthma, epilepsy and diabetes on the way to jail.  Serious sufferers ask for their medication and not claim symptoms.

I wonder how far he ran or how long he fought to trigger a fatal asthma attack which he doesn't carry an inhaler for?  Had he escaped, he could have died at home instead of in jail.

/The only thing missing is the taser report.
 
2014-08-25 05:40:18 AM  

radarlove: I was very disturbed to learn yesterday that comprehensive records are not kept- at either the national, state, or local levels-


Was google down that day?  In-custody deaths has numerous government and media articles.  Funny you found your shill site again.

/Not surprised that yesterday is when you learned everything.  Again.
 
2014-08-25 05:40:39 AM  
This is what happens when you hire undereducated, unskilled bullies and then fail to give them anywhere near adequate training for the many, many jobs with which they are tasked.  To do so many things well under uncertain, dangerous and often unique conditions requires emergency-room-physician levels of education and training.  Of course no city has the resources to fully train so many officers, but eventually one will hopefully have the courage to try it with a few and soon realize that 10 adequately trained cops can do the job of 100 gang members with badges.
 
2014-08-25 05:44:14 AM  

Apos: Let Asthmatic Perpetrators Die


After shiat That Happened Make Amends
 
2014-08-25 05:49:48 AM  

tbeatty: FTFA "There should not be any question that when somebody in custody is heard to say 'I cannot breathe,' the officers should promptly call for an ambulance," said Robert Saltzman

Uh, no.  They have nurses in jail.  No doubt they should have checked with nurse.  Big clue for life threatening asthma patients is a rescue inhaler.  They usually request the inhaler.  Any request for regular prescription medication such as insulin should automatically and immediately flag an evaluation.  Claiming to have an untreated medical condition, not so much.  Lots of people catch asthma, epilepsy and diabetes on the way to jail.  Serious sufferers ask for their medication and not claim symptoms.

I wonder how far he ran or how long he fought to trigger a fatal asthma attack which he doesn't carry an inhaler for?  Had he escaped, he could have died at home instead of in jail.

/The only thing missing is the taser report.


From what I have experienced with my own asthma, having your arms jacked backwards is definitely not helpful during an increasing asthma event.  Just another example of why I try to never attract the attention of anyone in a uniform.
 
2014-08-25 05:51:55 AM  
Whether he was on meth or not is immaterial. He was in the custody of The State and they are responsible for his well being.
 
2014-08-25 05:55:11 AM  

EggSniper: This is what happens when you hire undereducated, unskilled bullies and then fail to give them anywhere near adequate training for the many, many jobs with which they are tasked.  To do so many things well under uncertain, dangerous and often unique conditions requires emergency-room-physician levels of education and training.  Of course no city has the resources to fully train so many officers, but eventually one will hopefully have the courage to try it with a few and soon realize that 10 adequately trained cops can do the job of 100 gang members with badges.


Unfortunately, many cops in many jurisdictions are former HS jocks without enough ability to go pro and not enough brains to choose any other profession. So they take the path of least resistance to make a decent income, one which incidentally puts them in power positions. On the outside, they may be "Officers of the Law"- on the inside, what you have is still a school bully looking for some poor geek to beat up or threaten. This is not to say you don't have good cops out there, but it does take rather more weeding out, as you say.
 
2014-08-25 06:03:31 AM  

Mambo Bananapatch: I wonder. Do cops become assholes *after* becoming cops? Or are assholes drawn to law enforcement?

Prolly academic as it ends up the same way.


A little from column A, a little from column B.

I majored in Criminal Justice in college and entered into a police training program pretty early.  I've always had a very strong desire to help people and especially the people in my community- charity starts at home.  Now some of the people in the program with me were definitely there because police work appealed to their baser, more primal nature.  A few others were there because they had just gotten out of the service and saw police work as the natural stateside profession for their previously established military skillset.  But most of the people were training for the same reason I was- they grew up in the community and wanted to serve those in it.

The course itself eventually began to leave a sour taste in my mouth.  We were a relatively small city and I had always been under the impression that we had a community service focused approach to policing, but as time went on it became increasingly more apparent that my impressions were incorrect.  I learned many things in my classes, but most of all I learned that I would make a terrible cop.  I abhor dishonesty, and being able to lie to people to gain information is vital to being a police officer.  I believe in transparency and personal accountability, and neither of those things would make me many friends in The Club.  And the thought of using military weaponry and tactics against citizens of the United States absolutely goes against everything I stand for...but more and more, that is exactly what police work is becoming- a domestic military force.

I eventually decided to pursue a different path.  I kept in touch with many of my old classmates, however, and several of them did indeed gradually turn into assholes.  I think that part of it is the training, but I think that a bigger part of it is that policing as a whole has gone down a very dark and forceful path.  The citizenry largely recognizes this, and seethe with animosity in any interaction they have with the police.  When you enter policing because you want to help people, and all of the people you're trying to help resent you because of what your job has become, you begin to resent them back.

Once that happens, you become just another part of the problem, no matter what your original intentions were.
 
2014-08-25 06:04:04 AM  

tbeatty: FTFA "There should not be any question that when somebody in custody is heard to say 'I cannot breathe,' the officers should promptly call for an ambulance," said Robert Saltzman

Uh, no.  They have nurses in jail.  No doubt they should have checked with nurse.  Big clue for life threatening asthma patients is a rescue inhaler.  They usually request the inhaler.  Any request for regular prescription medication such as insulin should automatically and immediately flag an evaluation.  Claiming to have an untreated medical condition, not so much.  Lots of people catch asthma, epilepsy and diabetes on the way to jail.  Serious sufferers ask for their medication and not claim symptoms.


If I wasn't on a cell phone, Id list all the ways you're wrong about this

But you're wrong about this entire post.

/rescue inhalers are not always effective.
//Or even used correctly.
/// or even carried
 
2014-08-25 06:05:33 AM  
and in case anyone here has their head on backward, methamphetamine would HELP asthma. It is likely this man died because they took his vasodilator without recourse and killed him dead.

but why should cops know any of that? they aren't accountable and they can smear anyone with a false positive or two so...
 
2014-08-25 06:06:58 AM  
(bronchodialator, not "vaso-", pardon)
 
2014-08-25 06:09:47 AM  

tbeatty: FTFA "There should not be any question that when somebody in custody is heard to say 'I cannot breathe,' the officers should promptly call for an ambulance," said Robert Saltzman

Uh, no.  They have nurses in jail.  No doubt they should have checked with nurse.  Big clue for life threatening asthma patients is a rescue inhaler.  They usually request the inhaler.  Any request for regular prescription medication such as insulin should automatically and immediately flag an evaluation.  Claiming to have an untreated medical condition, not so much.  Lots of people catch asthma, epilepsy and diabetes on the way to jail.  Serious sufferers ask for their medication and not claim symptoms.


So you're saying that because some people might fake illnesses on the way to jail, unless a suspect asks for medication the police should ignore them? I'm allergic to fire ants. If I get stung, I'm not going to ask for someone to give me an epinephrine shot (especially if I don't know if they have one). I'm going to tell them I can't farking breathe because of an allergic reaction and to call an ambulance.


tbeatty: I wonder how far he ran or how long he fought to trigger a fatal asthma attack which he doesn't carry an inhaler for?  Had he escaped, he could have died at home instead of in jail.

/The only thing missing is the taser report.



Also FTFA: About 11:20 p.m. on Sept. 6, Azucena led police on a brief chase after running a red light, Beck wrote in the department report. The names of officers were redacted in a copy of the report provided to The Times under the public records act. The inspector general's report did not identify the officers by name.
According to Beck's report, the pursuit went on for a few miles, until Azucena stopped on the edge of a park and he and his two companions ran off.

Azucena was cornered quickly in a nearby apartment complex and gave himself up. Microphones worn by several officers at the scene captured Azucena complying with their commands to lie on the ground and telling them, "I can't breathe."


He ran a red light, they drove for a few miles running from the police before bailing out of the vehicle, and then he ran an indeterminate distance (but described as nearby) before giving up and complying with the officers. He didn't physically run far and he didn't fight. He shouldn't have run from the police, but that hardly warrants death by asphyxiation.
 
2014-08-25 06:19:48 AM  

tbeatty: Was google down that day? In-custody deaths has numerous government and media articles.


Articles, certainly.  But not a comprehensive database.  And a comprehensive database is absolutely what is needed.

tbeatty: Funny you found your shill site again.


Who, exactly, do you feel that the site I posted shills for?  Individuals who are interested in knowing exactly how many people die in police custody each year?  People who feel that the police should be held accountable for their actions?  Al Sharpton?

I think trying to compile a database of police killings is a pretty far cry from "shilling."

tbeatty: /Not surprised that yesterday is when you learned everything. Again.


Stay classy, Officer Beatty.
 
2014-08-25 06:37:24 AM  

SilentStrider: And no one will be held responsible.


Most especially not the junkie blowing through red lights, running from police, and not carrying the medication he needs.
 
2014-08-25 06:38:47 AM  
i.imgur.com

Bimbo give him his puffer!
 
2014-08-25 06:41:20 AM  

ThrobblefootSpectre: SilentStrider: And no one will be held responsible.

Most especially not the junkie blowing through red lights, running from police, and not carrying the medication he needs.


Moot point; said junkie was in the custody of The State, and therefore The State was responsible for his care. He indicated an inability to breathe due to asthma, refusing him medical care and his resultant death is negligent homicide. Of course we know that no police officers will ever be arrested or tried for this crime, because reasons.
 
2014-08-25 06:42:37 AM  

ThrobblefootSpectre: SilentStrider: And no one will be held responsible.

Most especially not the junkie blowing through red lights, running from police, and not carrying the medication he needs.


He still didn't deserve to die in a fashion that could easily have been prevented.
 
2014-08-25 06:46:18 AM  
Where's Joe Friday when we need him?     Negligently killing someone in custody is bad enough, lying to cover it up...

lawhaha.com

"It's awkward having a policeman around the house. Friends drop in, a man with a badge answers the door, the temperature drops 20 degrees.

You throw a party and that badge gets in the way. All of a sudden there isn't a straight man in the crowd. Everybody's a comedian. 'Don't drink too much,' somebody says, 'or the man with a badge'll run you in.' Or 'How's it going, Dick Tracy? How many jaywalkers did you pinch today?' And then there's always the one who wants to know how many apples you stole.

All at once you lost your first name. You're a cop, a flatfoot, a bull, a dick, John Law. You're the fuzz, the heat; you're poison, you're trouble, you're bad news. They call you everything, but never a policeman.

It's not much of a life, unless you don't mind missing a Dodger game because the hotshot phone rings. Unless you like working Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays, at a job that doesn't pay overtime. Oh, the pay's adequate-- if you count pennies you can put your kid through college, but you better plan on seeing Europe on your television set.

And then there's your first night on the beat. When you try to arrest a drunken prostitute in a Main St. bar and she rips your new uniform to shreds. You'll buy another one-- out of your own pocket.

And you're going to rub elbows with the elite-- pimps, addicts, thieves, bums, winos, girls who can't keep an address and men who don't care. Liars, cheats, con men-- the class of Skid Row.

And the heartbreak-- underfed kids, beaten kids, molested kids, lost kids, crying kids, homeless kids, hit-and-run kids, broken-arm kids, broken-leg kids, broken-head kids, sick kids, dying kids, dead kids. The old people nobody wants-- the reliefers, the pensioners, t he ones who walk the street cold, and those who tried to keep warm and died in a $3 room with an unventilated gas heater. You'll walk your beat and try to pick up the pieces.

Do you have real adventure in your soul? You better have, because you're gonna do time in a prowl car. Oh, it's going to be a thrill a minute when you get an unknown-trouble call and hit a backyard at two in the morning, never knowing who you'll meet-- a kid with a knife, a pill-head with a gun, or two ex-cons with nothing to lose.

And you're going to have plenty of time to think. You'll draw duty in a lonely car, with nobody to talk to but your radio.

Four years in uniform and you'll have the ability, the experience and maybe the desire to be a detective. If you like to fly by the seat of your pants, this is where you belong. For every crime that's committed, you've got three million suspects to choose from. And most of the time, you'll have few facts and a lot of hunches. You'll run down leads that dead-end on you. You'll work all-night stakeouts that could last a week. You'll do leg work until you're sure you've talked to everybody in the state of California.

People who saw it happen - but really didn't. People who insist they did it - but really didn't. People who don't remember - those who try to forget. Those who tell the truth - those who lie. You'll run the files until your eyes ache.

And paperwork? Oh, you'll fill out a report when you're right, you'll fill out a report when you're wrong, you'll fill one out when you're not sure, you'll fill one out listing your leads, you'll fill one out when you have no leads, you'll fill out a report on the reports you've made! You'll write enough words in your lifetime to stock a library.

You'll learn to live with doubt, anxiety, frustration. Court decisions that tend to hinder rather than help you. Dorado, Morse, Escobedo, Cahan. You'll learn to live with the District Attorney, testifying in court, defense attorneys, prosecuting attorneys, judges, juries, witnesses. And sometimes you're not going to be happy with the outcome.

But there's also this: there are over 5,000 men in this city, who know that being a policeman is an endless, glamourless, thankless job that's gotta be done. I know it, too, and I'm damn glad to be one of them."
 
2014-08-25 06:46:26 AM  
I know 6 cops/ex-cops/jailers. Two women, one who's a JOCO Sheriff deputy, the other a former jailer. In a confrontation, they'd let the suspect/arrestee take a step forward, warn them, then hit them with a baton/stun gun to the face. Hard.

The guys, OTOH, were more confrontational. My uncle would drop them with a baton/fist/let the dog loose at the slightest provocation (he's always been an egotistical farkward, and once knocked the shiat out of my brother for calling my mother out on being a raging alcoholic, because "respect"). Two others are cool, but since one of the guys' dad was KIA in a shootout with a Native meth-head, he's more prone to shoot first if someone is an actual threat. Still keeps his cool though, unless someone calls him or any responding officer a "farking" anything (farking cops! is what the guy who shot his dad screamed while unloading on everyone who responded to the robbery call). Understandable, but still a cool guy once the badge is off.

The other one...5'6", a bully in HS, and overall shouldn't be near anything sharper than a dull butterknife. After graduation, I grew nearly a foot, dropped 80lbs, and learned to be socially outgoing. More so with enough whiskey. At our 10yr reunion, Mr. Officer Sir rolled up expecting everyone who'd moved away to bow down. No one did, and a couple of guys who'd actually gone off to Iraq and Afghanistan heckled him a bit about how he was bragging about DUI and joint busts and going through taser/tear gas training. One guy, Jared, held up a hand and asked if a bong had exploded, leaving him missing two fingers and the scar up his arm where they scavenged skin to cover up the stumps. And Darrin said, I quote: "No, but wasn't stupid enough to go get myself shot at when there are plenty of dumbfarks willing to go do it!"

Needless to say, after having been a fat beta type in HS who TRIED to get into the military...Darrin was on duty the next night and ticketed everybody, for something, who cheered me on as I ripped into him and insulted everything (according to my friends, I was almost blackout drunk by this point, apparently, and thank God I stand nearly a foot taller and this was so far out from my HS behavior...) from his parentage (his dad killed himself) to his sister getting knocked up by a black guy, to his younger sister being a hambeast knocked up by an Indian at 15, to him not making grades good enough for the military and being too crazy for them to want him, and I supposedly said (seriously, copied from a FB message) "The only reason you became a cop is so you can legally say you shot your piece at a man without letting everyone know you're a raging closet midget farker posting on Craigslist!".

He wrote around 150 tickets the next night, for campfire/campsite/parking violations, "noise complaints", and littering.
 
2014-08-25 06:52:48 AM  

ThrobblefootSpectre: SilentStrider: And no one will be held responsible.

Most especially not the junkie blowing through red lights, running from police, and not carrying the medication he needs.


I am beyond sick of this attitude that because police deal with crap people, they have an excuse for being violent and neglectful. Dealing with crap people is a police officer's job. That's what they signed up to do.

So if our police departments are overburdened, let's reduce the number of things they can arrest people for.
 
2014-08-25 06:54:20 AM  

CRtwenty: He still didn't deserve to die in a fashion that could easily have been prevented.


No he didn't, I agree.  I'm just saying the guy himself created the situation.  Yet everyone here will only condemn the police.  Yes, they should have had him evaluated.  But that doesn't change the fact that he put himself in that situation by being a complete asshat.  The police just failed to save him from his own shiathead criminal idiocy.  No sympathy here for either side.

I have a partially paralyzed friend who was t-boned by an uninsured druggie who went through a red light at full speed. (No auto liability insurance).  No sympathy here for asshats who do shiat like that.  Zero.
 
2014-08-25 07:01:19 AM  

ThrobblefootSpectre: CRtwenty: He still didn't deserve to die in a fashion that could easily have been prevented.

No he didn't, I agree.  I'm just saying the guy himself created the situation.  Yet everyone here will only condemn the police.  Yes, they should have had him evaluated.  But that doesn't change the fact that he put himself in that situation by being a complete asshat.  The police just failed to save him from his own shiathead criminal idiocy.  No sympathy here for either side.

I have a partially paralyzed friend who was t-boned by an uninsured druggie who went through a red light at full speed. (No auto liability insurance).  No sympathy here for asshats who do shiat like that.  Zero.


Thank you for revealing you bias from personal tragedy. It allows the reader to understand you have lost the ability think objectively about this subject matter as you perception is obviously clouded by emotion.
 
2014-08-25 07:03:32 AM  
Does triple training officers lead to more empathy, or filter out those with less? I never can find an answer to this question.
 
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