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(International Business Times)   Oldest metal object ever found in Middle East unearthed, immediately thrown at Israeli tanks   (ibtimes.com) divider line 40
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5804 clicks; posted to Geek » on 23 Aug 2014 at 8:22 PM (18 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



40 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-08-23 06:06:06 PM  
The first edition of Clue: "In the field, with an icepick".

/bronze
 
2014-08-23 06:57:07 PM  
Awl in?
 
2014-08-23 07:43:57 PM  
Oldest Metal Ever Discovered In Middle East Found In A Woman's Grave In Israel

\m/ \m/
 
2014-08-23 08:05:24 PM  
I read that as "Middle Earth" and wondered if it was a ring.
 
2014-08-23 08:30:30 PM  
img.fark.net

Oldest metal object.

/RIP
//but he was really old
 
2014-08-23 08:39:21 PM  
The very reason I will be made into an fish reef.
 
2014-08-23 08:46:40 PM  
Putting a notch in the bed post was kinda different in Jezebel's day
 
2014-08-23 08:57:04 PM  
The lesson, get buried with the latest technology and you too can become famous in a few thousand years!
 
2014-08-23 08:58:30 PM  
So smelting of copper was much known earlier than thought. Interesting what does this imply for earliest civilizations
 
2014-08-23 09:29:54 PM  
Was it Lemmy?

I bet it was Lemmy.
 
2014-08-23 09:38:16 PM  

Warmnight: So smelting of copper was much known earlier than thought. Interesting what does this imply for earliest civilizations


Probably that they were smelting copper.
 
2014-08-23 09:46:03 PM  
Hahaha .... It's funny cause it's true.
 
2014-08-23 10:02:47 PM  
Funny how all the ongoing archaeology in Israel seems to focus on time periods from the biblical era (say around the first few decades AD) and earlier. There seems to be a substantial dearth of archeological findings from about, oh, say, 800-1900AD. I wonder why that is? Hmm.... There MUST be layers of civilization from that time. I wonder what kind of people lived in the area then... It sure is a mystery.
 
2014-08-23 10:16:18 PM  

amyldoanitrite: Funny how all the ongoing archaeology in Israel seems to focus on time periods from the biblical era (say around the first few decades AD) and earlier. There seems to be a substantial dearth of archeological findings from about, oh, say, 800-1900AD. I wonder why that is? Hmm.... There MUST be layers of civilization from that time. I wonder what kind of people lived in the area then... It sure is a mystery.


4000 BC is a little early for anything other 'Hey, let's check out this tree' in biblical times.
 
2014-08-23 10:26:00 PM  

Shakin_Haitian: Warmnight: So smelting of copper was much known earlier than thought. Interesting what does this imply for earliest civilizations

Probably that they were smelting copper.


img.wonderhowto.com
 
2014-08-23 11:07:47 PM  

TheOther: amyldoanitrite: Funny how all the ongoing archaeology in Israel seems to focus on time periods from the biblical era (say around the first few decades AD) and earlier. There seems to be a substantial dearth of archeological findings from about, oh, say, 800-1900AD. I wonder why that is? Hmm.... There MUST be layers of civilization from that time. I wonder what kind of people lived in the area then... It sure is a mystery.

4000 BC is a little early for anything other 'Hey, let's check out this tree' in biblical times.


Yeah, I know... Sorry. This thread probably wasn't an appropriate place for that (although I still say it's a valid statement).

Let's just say that, when I posted, I had a slight case of Sierra Nevada.
 
2014-08-23 11:45:54 PM  
Look at this. It's worthless - ten dollars from a vendor in the street. But I take it, I bury it in the sand for a thousand years, it becomes priceless.
 
2014-08-24 12:06:51 AM  

Warmnight: So smelting of copper was much known earlier than thought. Interesting what does this imply for earliest civilizations


I suspect a lot of it was washed away by the sea. People are clever and have been aligns for a lot longer than five thousand years. I'm not saying anything crazy like advanced civilizations or aliens, but some cool bronze age civilizations may have been washed away. Of course I'm not the most qualified archeologist in the subject.

/or any kind of archeologists at all
 
2014-08-24 12:12:52 AM  
I love this kind of thing for several reasons. One, it's always so cool to speculate on who the person was and what their life was like. Two, it's awesome to have confirmation that science plays it conservatively (non-political meaning). You rarely hear science *overestimating* something; it's almost always "this proves X occurred earlier than we thought," which really means "we now have evidence that X occurred earlier than our previous evidence showed," which means good science is happening. Three, when it comes down to "X occurred a few hundred years earlier" instead of a few thousand, it means we're narrowing down the precise dates. Even "several hundred" is pretty good for poorly-recorded events from 6000+ years ago.*

I really wonder who she was and what her life was like. Discounting technology, I bet it wasn't all that different from ours. Nothing new under the sun and all that.

*yes, I know. Obvious jokes are obvious so I'm leaving it alone.
 
2014-08-24 12:15:38 AM  

picturescrazy: Warmnight: So smelting of copper was much known earlier than thought. Interesting what does this imply for earliest civilizations

I suspect a lot of it was washed away by the sea. People are clever and have been aligns for a lot longer than five thousand years. I'm not saying anything crazy like advanced civilizations or aliens, but some cool bronze age civilizations may have been washed away. Of course I'm not the most qualified archeologist in the subject.

/or any kind of archeologists at all


Paging Farker raerae1980 to the archeology thread...

/and when did the second "a" disappear from archAeology? Autocorrect insists.
 
2014-08-24 12:19:53 AM  

brimed03: picturescrazy: Warmnight: So smelting of copper was much known earlier than thought. Interesting what does this imply for earliest civilizations

I suspect a lot of it was washed away by the sea. People are clever and have been aligns for a lot longer than five thousand years. I'm not saying anything crazy like advanced civilizations or aliens, but some cool bronze age civilizations may have been washed away. Of course I'm not the most qualified archeologist in the subject.

/or any kind of archeologists at all

Paging Farker raerae1980 to the archeology thread...

/and when did the second "a" disappear from archAeology? Autocorrect insists.


I don't know, but it changed my around to align. :(
 
2014-08-24 01:18:36 AM  

brimed03: I really wonder who she was and what her life was like. Discounting technology, I bet it wasn't all that different from ours. Nothing new under the sun and all that.


But technology is everything.  Her life would have been incredibly different from ours -- almost unrecognizable.  Forget recent stuff like the internet and the light bulb (though it's worth noting that her day ended an hour after sundown).  Assuming she was wealthy (which I am from the shells) she still probably only ever met a few people from more than 10 miles from her birthplace.  If she wasn't, she didn't meet anyone from that far away. For almost everyone, there was no way to keep information other than memory and for the people who did have that ability about the only information they kept was transaction details.  No ideas from other than her community and maybe the occasional trader.  Planning for where the water was going to come from.  Hiking to a place out of the town to relieve herself.  Little diversity of foods.
 
2014-08-24 02:26:16 AM  

Shakin_Haitian: Warmnight: So smelting of copper was much known earlier than thought. Interesting what does this imply for earliest civilizations

Probably that they were smelting copper.


and then a bunch of mead heads would steal it...
 
2014-08-24 03:17:10 AM  

picturescrazy: Warmnight: So smelting of copper was much known earlier than thought. Interesting what does this imply for earliest civilizations

I suspect a lot of it was washed away by the sea. People are clever and have been aligns for a lot longer than five thousand years. I'm not saying anything crazy like advanced civilizations or aliens, but some cool bronze age civilizations may have been washed away. Of course I'm not the most qualified archeologist in the subject.

/or any kind of archeologists at all


Some the earliest weren't washed away so much as drowned by rising seas after the last ice age. The Mediterranean used to be a fertile valley. Same with the sea of Marmara, the black sea, and The sea of Azov. Probably even the Caspian.

There are places in the red sea and Persian gulf where former settlements can be found under water.
 
2014-08-24 03:17:52 AM  
At first glance I thought the title was:
Oldest metal object ever found in Middle Earth unearthed....
img.fark.net
When I realized my mistake I was too disappointed to even click on the link.
 
2014-08-24 03:32:44 AM  
At least it wasn't a puppy.
/wish I was kidding.
 
2014-08-24 04:15:31 AM  

doofusgumby: Some the earliest weren't washed away so much as drowned by rising seas after the last ice age. The Mediterranean used to be a fertile valley.


There were no civilizations when the last ice age ended 10,000 years ago. And the Mediterranean has been wet for millions of years.
 
2014-08-24 05:04:08 AM  

jaytkay: There were no civilizations when the last ice age ended 10,000 years ago. And the Mediterranean has been wet for millions of years.


Thank you for making this comment. It caused me to read about ice ages, the Quaternary glaciation, interglacial periods, the Zanclean deluge, and the Messinian salinity crisis. But please don't make any more interesting comments right away, as it is late, and I have to get some sleep. ;-)
 
2014-08-24 06:38:22 AM  

jaytkay: doofusgumby: Some the earliest weren't washed away so much as drowned by rising seas after the last ice age. The Mediterranean used to be a fertile valley.

There were no civilizations when the last ice age ended 10,000 years ago. And the Mediterranean has been wet for millions of years.


Sea levels rose by about 50m from 10,000 years ago to 6-7,000 years ago, and 2-3m after that. You also get coastal erosion and subsidence, plus tectonic activity. Former coastal and island settlements could now be underwater.
 
2014-08-24 07:47:09 AM  

Manfred J. Hattan: brimed03: I really wonder who she was and what her life was like. Discounting technology, I bet it wasn't all that different from ours. Nothing new under the sun and all that.

But technology is everything.  Her life would have been incredibly different from ours -- almost unrecognizable.  Forget recent stuff like the internet and the light bulb (though it's worth noting that her day ended an hour after sundown).  Assuming she was wealthy (which I am from the shells) she still probably only ever met a few people from more than 10 miles from her birthplace.  If she wasn't, she didn't meet anyone from that far away. For almost everyone, there was no way to keep information other than memory and for the people who did have that ability about the only information they kept was transaction details.  No ideas from other than her community and maybe the occasional trader.  Planning for where the water was going to come from.  Hiking to a place out of the town to relieve herself.  Little diversity of foods.


She must have met traders, since I assume the ostrich weren't native to that area. Or perhaps it were at that time?

The copper implies that they had fire. So she could go to bed whenever she felt like, seeing as she had light.
 
2014-08-24 08:16:44 AM  

picturescrazy: Warmnight: So smelting of copper was much known earlier than thought. Interesting what does this imply for earliest civilizations

I suspect a lot of it was washed away by the sea. People are clever and have been aligns for a lot longer than five thousand years. I'm not saying anything crazy like advanced civilizations or aliens, but some cool bronze age civilizations may have been washed away. Of course I'm not the most qualified archeologist in the subject.

/or any kind of archeologists at all




Don't sell yourself short. At the very least you are an internet archeologist.
 
2014-08-24 10:29:19 AM  

dillengest: jaytkay: doofusgumby: Some the earliest weren't washed away so much as drowned by rising seas after the last ice age. The Mediterranean used to be a fertile valley.

There were no civilizations when the last ice age ended 10,000 years ago. And the Mediterranean has been wet for millions of years.

Sea levels rose by about 50m from 10,000 years ago to 6-7,000 years ago, and 2-3m after that. You also get coastal erosion and subsidence, plus tectonic activity. Former coastal and island settlements could now be underwater.


Also, the finds in Göbekli Tepe (etc) push back that "no civilization" date (depending on definitions, I suppose).

Beyond the sea level rise, it looks like there's catastrophic flooding (e.g., Black Sea) that could well have put some pretty interesting stuff underwater.

But it seems unlikely that any advanced technology was wiped off the planet. Atlantis remains the realm of kooks.
 
2014-08-24 11:28:44 AM  

dillengest: Sea levels rose by about 50m from 10,000 years ago to 6-7,000 years ago, and 2-3m after that. You also get coastal erosion and subsidence, plus tectonic activity. Former coastal and island settlements could now be underwater.


I see, thanks. 50m is huge!

Monkeyfark Ridiculous: the finds in Göbekli Tepe (etc) push back that "no civilization" date (depending on definitions, I suppose).


The Wikipedia page is a little confusing, but it appears these carved pillars are 8K to 10K years old. Whoa. I've never read about Göbekli Tepe, thanks!

upload.wikimedia.org
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2014-08-24 11:30:59 AM  

spawn73: She must have met traders, since I assume the ostrich weren't native to that area. Or perhaps it were at that time?


TFA says the copper is believed to be from the Caucasus, so even if ostriches were local they had long distance trade..
 
2014-08-24 11:49:04 AM  

Warmnight: So smelting of copper was much known earlier than thought. Interesting what does this imply for earliest civilizations


Maybe not smelting. It could have been cold-worked from a seam. Hard to imagine today, but at the start of civilization, stuff was just lying around in the open air.
 
2014-08-24 06:07:12 PM  

Valiente: Warmnight: So smelting of copper was much known earlier than thought. Interesting what does this imply for earliest civilizations

Maybe not smelting. It could have been cold-worked from a seam. Hard to imagine today, but at the start of civilization, stuff was just lying around in the open air.


Hell, it has only been about a century since people found a whole shiatload of untouched farking *diamonds* just lying around in the open air.
 
2014-08-25 02:30:44 AM  

dillengest: jaytkay: doofusgumby: Some the earliest weren't washed away so much as drowned by rising seas after the last ice age. The Mediterranean used to be a fertile valley.

There were no civilizations when the last ice age ended 10,000 years ago. And the Mediterranean has been wet for millions of years.

Sea levels rose by about 50m from 10,000 years ago to 6-7,000 years ago, and 2-3m after that. You also get coastal erosion and subsidence, plus tectonic activity. Former coastal and island settlements could now be underwater.


Atlantis! You know where it is don't you? You can't keep the secret forever you know. Eventually you'll crack...
 
2014-08-25 02:38:05 AM  

jaytkay: dillengest: Sea levels rose by about 50m from 10,000 years ago to 6-7,000 years ago, and 2-3m after that. You also get coastal erosion and subsidence, plus tectonic activity. Former coastal and island settlements could now be underwater.

I see, thanks. 50m is huge!

Monkeyfark Ridiculous: the finds in Göbekli Tepe (etc) push back that "no civilization" date (depending on definitions, I suppose).

The Wikipedia page is a little confusing, but it appears these carved pillars are 8K to 10K years old. Whoa. I've never read about Göbekli Tepe, thanks!

[upload.wikimedia.org image 319x480]
[Link][upload.wikimedia.org image 300x479]


Followed by Megiddo about a thousand years later (7000 BCE) I believe. And biblical to boot!
 
2014-08-25 02:58:49 AM  
Wealthy of the past were living like the lower middle class today. You can't go vacations to Pompeii, without being filthy rich and surrounded by your own platoon. Most farkers here if they thrown into antiquity would caught into slavery.
 
2014-08-25 03:48:57 AM  

jaytkay: The Wikipedia page is a little confusing, but it appears these carved pillars are 8K to 10K years old. Whoa. I've never read about Göbekli Tepe, thanks!


My pleasure. Definitely whoa. Dates to about 11,000 years ago (9000 BCE). "There's more time between Gobekli Tepe and the Sumerian clay tablets [etched in 3300 B.C.] than from Sumer to today."http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/gobekli-tepe-the-worlds- first-te mple-83613665/
 
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