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(Chicago Trib)   Mass graves of more than two dozen 19th century settlers are being relocated so a proper home can be built atop them. Carol Anne, don't go into the light   (chicagotribune.com ) divider line
    More: Scary, Oak Brook, settlers, DuPage County, Broome County, fragile state, public nuisance, human skull  
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4053 clicks; posted to Main » on 23 Aug 2014 at 2:57 PM (1 year ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-08-23 01:44:17 PM  
i1079.photobucket.com
 
2014-08-23 02:59:44 PM  
How unsettling.
 
2014-08-23 03:06:00 PM  
They belong in a museum.
 
2014-08-23 03:09:21 PM  
img.fark.net

Hai guys!  What's going on in this thread?
 
2014-08-23 03:10:27 PM  
What a waste of resources
 
2014-08-23 03:10:36 PM  
Bet the daisies will grow really well in the front flower bed.
 
2014-08-23 03:11:52 PM  
Were they pretentious douches even back then?
 
2014-08-23 03:32:37 PM  
Sooner or later we have to give up this obsession we have with our dead. One day we're simply going to run out of space to bury them or the value of the real estate will outweigh the value of the corpses.

They're dead, they ain't coming back. Burn them and spread the ashes in a field someplace.
 
2014-08-23 03:40:59 PM  
his will specified that a half-acre of his farm officially be set aside as a cemetery,

which once contained 400 bodies,


now a half acre is 21,780 sq ft or let's say 100 x 218 ft. so if each grave was 5 ft wide and 10 ft long you might get 400 graves.

when i started the math i didn't think it would be possible. heck at 150 x 145.2 you could get 450 graves.

and if you double stacked them ............
 
2014-08-23 03:51:40 PM  
ts1.mm.bing.net

Don't drink the well water. The ground is sour.
 
2014-08-23 03:52:24 PM  
This is scary why, exactly?
 
2014-08-23 04:08:24 PM  

doctor wu: This is scary why, exactly?


Subby sleeps with his head under the covers.
 
2014-08-23 04:11:12 PM  

ReapTheChaos: Sooner or later we have to give up this obsession we have with our dead. One day we're simply going to run out of space to bury them or the value of the real estate will outweigh the value of the corpses.

They're dead, they ain't coming back. Burn them and spread the ashes in a field someplace.


Pretty much my thoughts on the matter.
 
2014-08-23 04:14:39 PM  
I just seen an old episode of happy days when Fonzi had his bar. The woman he was trying to date had a young daughter played by the young Poltergeist actress
 
2014-08-23 04:17:58 PM  

ReapTheChaos: Sooner or later we have to give up this obsession we have with our dead. One day we're simply going to run out of space to bury them or the value of the real estate will outweigh the value of the corpses.

They're dead, they ain't coming back. Burn them and spread the ashes in a field someplace.


Can we start by digging up your relatives?
 
2014-08-23 04:41:15 PM  

Lord Farkwad: ReapTheChaos: Sooner or later we have to give up this obsession we have with our dead. One day we're simply going to run out of space to bury them or the value of the real estate will outweigh the value of the corpses.

They're dead, they ain't coming back. Burn them and spread the ashes in a field someplace.

Can we start by digging up your relatives?


It's a silly custom that needs to come to an end. We say stupid things like "rest in piece" and "laid to rest". They're not resting, they're rotting. It's ridiculous. Personally, I'm being cremated and my kids know to plant a tree and spread my ashes in with the roots along with the fertilizer.
 
2014-08-23 05:07:57 PM  
Tom Kane shot his wife over this ..
 
2014-08-23 05:11:36 PM  
...Paul Butler, the late industrialist-turned-real estate developer who formed Oak Brook in 1958. Butler Co., his real estate firm, eventually bought the land and in 1962 subdivided it into what today is the Brook Forest development.

At Butler's request, the village declared the cemetery a public nuisance. In an ordinance signed Sept. 11, 1962, Oak Brook allowed the cemetery to be vacated on the condition that Butler's company remove all the headstones, coffins and human remains at its own expense and, under the supervision of licensed undertakers, put them in another cemetery.

McGowan said the removal work was not well done.
"They didn't do it thoroughly," he said. "In some cases they took just the arms and the legs."

-

Classy.
 
2014-08-23 05:38:08 PM  
I just wrapped up a summer field season doing exhumations in a cemetery, check out this article about what we've been up to:

http://gizmodo.com/the-coldest-of-the-cold-cases-using-dna-to-identi fy -ce-1619702295


/getting a kick, etc.
 
2014-08-23 05:51:33 PM  
img.fark.net
Look, Daddy! Dingleberry has come back alives!
 
2014-08-23 06:06:39 PM  

ReapTheChaos: Sooner or later we have to give up this obsession we have with our dead. One day we're simply going to run out of space to bury them or the value of the real estate will outweigh the value of the corpses.

They're dead, they ain't coming back. Burn them and spread the ashes in a field someplace.


Actually, as someone who has excavated and studied skeletons/cemeteries, I hope not. And yes, I have worked a site where homes were built right on top of a Native burial site.
 
2014-08-23 06:10:28 PM  

everlastinggobstopper: I just wrapped up a summer field season doing exhumations in a cemetery, check out this article about what we've been up to:

http://gizmodo.com/the-coldest-of-the-cold-cases-using-dna-to-identi fy -ce-1619702295


/getting a kick, etc.


In all seriousness, do you need any more anthropologists/bioarchaeologists for your site? My grad program was terrible and the forensic anthropologist was useless in helping us get established. Hell, you may have heard about her. Or was this strictly volunteer?
 
2014-08-23 06:22:47 PM  
electricshadowsfilmblog.files.wordpress.com
Couldn't they just have moved the headstones?
 
2014-08-23 06:26:26 PM  

ReapTheChaos: Sooner or later we have to give up this obsession we have with our dead. One day we're simply going to run out of space to bury them or the value of the real estate will outweigh the value of the corpses.

They're dead, they ain't coming back. Burn them and spread the ashes in a field someplace.


Or, work around them.

Archaeologists from the York Archaeological Trust discovered the lost cemetery of York's medieval Jews in the early 1980s at the site of what is now the multi-level car park at Sainsbury's. As one of only ten Jewish cemeteries in medieval England and the only to be extensively excavated, the cemetery in Jewbury offered a tantalizing glimpse into the lives and deaths of an enigmatic community of which little is known.

The cemetery was in use from around 1177 AD until the expulsion of the Jews from England in 1290.


500 skeletons were excavated, but it's estimated that there were 1000+ burials total. The excavated skeletons were reinterred, under a rabbi's supervision; the remaining burials are undisturbed underneath the car park.

Got to be practical with these things, there's only so much space and thousands of years of continuous habitation in Europe. If people freaked out about this shiat, nobody could build anywhere.

/Keep the history as best you can, though.
 
2014-08-23 06:42:03 PM  

raerae1980: everlastinggobstopper: I just wrapped up a summer field season doing exhumations in a cemetery, check out this article about what we've been up to:

http://gizmodo.com/the-coldest-of-the-cold-cases-using-dna-to-identi fy -ce-1619702295


/getting a kick, etc.

In all seriousness, do you need any more anthropologists/bioarchaeologists for your site? My grad program was terrible and the forensic anthropologist was useless in helping us get established. Hell, you may have heard about her. Or was this strictly volunteer?


Lol I was going to reply to everlastinggobstopper to ask if he knew about you, as a fellow Farking anthropo/archeologist. Then I saw you were in thread and on it.
 
2014-08-23 07:29:28 PM  

ReapTheChaos: Sooner or later we have to give up this obsession we have with our dead. One day we're simply going to run out of space to bury them or the value of the real estate will outweigh the value of the corpses.

They're dead, they ain't coming back. Burn them and spread the ashes in a field someplace.


In the olden days, a church would bury a dead body, and stick all the bones they found in ossuaries. They just reused the cemetery and let rot and worms clean the bones.

Basically graveyard crop rotation!
 
2014-08-23 07:31:27 PM  

Curious: his will specified that a half-acre of his farm officially be set aside as a cemetery,

which once contained 400 bodies,

now a half acre is 21,780 sq ft or let's say 100 x 218 ft. so if each grave was 5 ft wide and 10 ft long you might get 400 graves.

when i started the math i didn't think it would be possible. heck at 150 x 145.2 you could get 450 graves.

and if you double stacked them ............


Graves can be 3 feet wide and 7' long.
 
2014-08-23 07:39:20 PM  

brimed03: raerae1980: everlastinggobstopper: I just wrapped up a summer field season doing exhumations in a cemetery, check out this article about what we've been up to:

http://gizmodo.com/the-coldest-of-the-cold-cases-using-dna-to-identi fy -ce-1619702295


/getting a kick, etc.

In all seriousness, do you need any more anthropologists/bioarchaeologists for your site? My grad program was terrible and the forensic anthropologist was useless in helping us get established. Hell, you may have heard about her. Or was this strictly volunteer?

Lol I was going to reply to everlastinggobstopper to ask if he knew about you, as a fellow Farking anthropo/archeologist. Then I saw you were in thread and on it.


Awww, thanks for thinking of me ;)
 
2014-08-23 07:42:37 PM  

raerae1980: everlastinggobstopper: I just wrapped up a summer field season doing exhumations in a cemetery, check out this article about what we've been up to:

http://gizmodo.com/the-coldest-of-the-cold-cases-using-dna-to-identi fy -ce-1619702295


/getting a kick, etc.

In all seriousness, do you need any more anthropologists/bioarchaeologists for your site? My grad program was terrible and the forensic anthropologist was useless in helping us get established. Hell, you may have heard about her. Or was this strictly volunteer?


The field class is run through an independent non-profit organization - the page for the class is linked in the article. We'll be taking applications for 2015 around Thanksgiving. It costs an arm and a leg (mostly due to housing/food costs), and it's super demanding - both physically and emotionally - but it's also tremendously rewarding and about as unique an opportunity as you can get.

As for your grad program and the forensic anthropologist helping to get you 'established' - there's a line out the door and around the block for jobs in forensic anthropology and very very few jobs to put them in, so even if the person you're referring to was AMAZING, most of the people looking for jobs in that program would end up disappointed.
 
2014-08-23 07:45:20 PM  
Things like this are pretty common, actually. Downtown in my city, there's a gas station that sits on the site of an old cemetery. When they were digging for the tanks in the 1980s, they found human remains. The cemetery that once occupied the lot had been moved after the church associated with it closed. And by "moved," I mean that the deceased which still had living family members willing to pay for their reburial elsewhere were exhumed and reintered. The other graves were dug up and the remains reburied in a pit. This was apparently done with less enthusiasm than the task warranted, or else any unmarked graves were forgotten - hence the bones found when they were digging for the gas station tanks.

The story came up again recently when a local fellow was re-setting the paving stones in his sidewalk. He turned one of them over and found that it was part of a child's tombstone. The stones for the graves which didn't have someone willing to pay for their reinterment were sold for scrap.
 
2014-08-23 07:46:41 PM  
Rich people getting the local government declare your final resting place "a nuisance", and getting ripped out of your grave is just one more reason to be creamated.
 
2014-08-23 07:48:24 PM  

everlastinggobstopper: raerae1980: everlastinggobstopper: I just wrapped up a summer field season doing exhumations in a cemetery, check out this article about what we've been up to:

http://gizmodo.com/the-coldest-of-the-cold-cases-using-dna-to-identi fy -ce-1619702295


/getting a kick, etc.

In all seriousness, do you need any more anthropologists/bioarchaeologists for your site? My grad program was terrible and the forensic anthropologist was useless in helping us get established. Hell, you may have heard about her. Or was this strictly volunteer?

The field class is run through an independent non-profit organization - the page for the class is linked in the article. We'll be taking applications for 2015 around Thanksgiving. It costs an arm and a leg (mostly due to housing/food costs), and it's super demanding - both physically and emotionally - but it's also tremendously rewarding and about as unique an opportunity as you can get.

As for your grad program and the forensic anthropologist helping to get you 'established' - there's a line out the door and around the block for jobs in forensic anthropology and very very few jobs to put them in, so even if the person you're referring to was AMAZING, most of the people looking for jobs in that program would end up disappointed.


Thanks. Frankly, they should eliminate the program, considering how few opportunities there are, versus the costs of attending to get the degrees. I'm just a "little bitter" about the whole thing.

Ill look into it more, thanks again.
 
2014-08-23 08:21:32 PM  

kim jong-un: Curious: his will specified that a half-acre of his farm officially be set aside as a cemetery,

which once contained 400 bodies,

now a half acre is 21,780 sq ft or let's say 100 x 218 ft. so if each grave was 5 ft wide and 10 ft long you might get 400 graves.

when i started the math i didn't think it would be possible. heck at 150 x 145.2 you could get 450 graves.

and if you double stacked them ............

Graves can be 3 feet wide and 7' long.



Definitely. Also keep in mind that the amount of space that cemeteries took up has changed drastically over time - cemeteries from the period mentioned in TFA tended to have pretty small plots - 4'X8' being pretty common. When space became limited, or when cemetery operators saw an opportunity to make more money, or when families couldn't afford the full price of a plot, those plots got even smaller. Today's cemeteries are these huge expanses of land with wide headstones, lots of space between burials, and wide roads between grave blocks. Not so in the even recent past.
 
2014-08-23 08:29:46 PM  

raerae1980: everlastinggobstopper: raerae1980: everlastinggobstopper: I just wrapped up a summer field season doing exhumations in a cemetery, check out this article about what we've been up to:

http://gizmodo.com/the-coldest-of-the-cold-cases-using-dna-to-identi fy -ce-1619702295


/getting a kick, etc.

In all seriousness, do you need any more anthropologists/bioarchaeologists for your site? My grad program was terrible and the forensic anthropologist was useless in helping us get established. Hell, you may have heard about her. Or was this strictly volunteer?

The field class is run through an independent non-profit organization - the page for the class is linked in the article. We'll be taking applications for 2015 around Thanksgiving. It costs an arm and a leg (mostly due to housing/food costs), and it's super demanding - both physically and emotionally - but it's also tremendously rewarding and about as unique an opportunity as you can get.

As for your grad program and the forensic anthropologist helping to get you 'established' - there's a line out the door and around the block for jobs in forensic anthropology and very very few jobs to put them in, so even if the person you're referring to was AMAZING, most of the people looking for jobs in that program would end up disappointed.

Thanks. Frankly, they should eliminate the program, considering how few opportunities there are, versus the costs of attending to get the degrees. I'm just a "little bitter" about the whole thing.

Ill look into it more, thanks again.


We start our interviewing process with a reminder that the likelihood that you'll be doing that stuff for a living is very, very small. I inform applicants that the number of people employed full-time doing forensic anthropology in any given state within the U.S. can usually fit within a small classroom. Deans and administration usually don't like for you to harp on that though, because they're making money off the dreams of undergrads. 'We have a forensic anth program! You've seen CSI, right? You can take a class in that here at _________ University!!' Sorry you're bitter. If they didn't give you a heads up, they definitely should have.
 
2014-08-23 08:39:53 PM  

kim jong-un: Graves can be 3 feet wide and 7' long.


where the casket goes, sure. i was allowing a little for a head stone and space to walk between graves.
 
2014-08-23 10:20:46 PM  

everlastinggobstopper: raerae1980: everlastinggobstopper: raerae1980: everlastinggobstopper: I just wrapped up a summer field season doing exhumations in a cemetery, check out this article about what we've been up to:

http://gizmodo.com/the-coldest-of-the-cold-cases-using-dna-to-identi fy -ce-1619702295


/getting a kick, etc.

In all seriousness, do you need any more anthropologists/bioarchaeologists for your site? My grad program was terrible and the forensic anthropologist was useless in helping us get established. Hell, you may have heard about her. Or was this strictly volunteer?

The field class is run through an independent non-profit organization - the page for the class is linked in the article. We'll be taking applications for 2015 around Thanksgiving. It costs an arm and a leg (mostly due to housing/food costs), and it's super demanding - both physically and emotionally - but it's also tremendously rewarding and about as unique an opportunity as you can get.

As for your grad program and the forensic anthropologist helping to get you 'established' - there's a line out the door and around the block for jobs in forensic anthropology and very very few jobs to put them in, so even if the person you're referring to was AMAZING, most of the people looking for jobs in that program would end up disappointed.

Thanks. Frankly, they should eliminate the program, considering how few opportunities there are, versus the costs of attending to get the degrees. I'm just a "little bitter" about the whole thing.

Ill look into it more, thanks again.

We start our interviewing process with a reminder that the likelihood that you'll be doing that stuff for a living is very, very small. I inform applicants that the number of people employed full-time doing forensic anthropology in any given state within the U.S. can usually fit within a small classroom. Deans and administration usually don't like for you to harp on that though, because they're making money off the dreams of undergrads. 'We have a forensic anth program! You've seen CSI, right? You can take a class in that here at _________ University!!' Sorry you're bitter. If they didn't give you a heads up, they definitely should have.


My whole grad program was a mess, but the icing on the cake was when the Coroner's office said they don't accept applicants with anthro degrees. Considering how many of my peers went into the program with that as their career choice, it seems like the anthro department lied in a big, costly way.

/bitter
 
2014-08-23 11:30:15 PM  

raerae1980: everlastinggobstopper: raerae1980: everlastinggobstopper: raerae1980: everlastinggobstopper: I just wrapped up a summer field season doing exhumations in a cemetery, check out this article about what we've been up to:

We start our interviewing process with a reminder that the likelihood that you'll be doing that stuff for a living is very, very small. I inform applicants that the number of people employed full-time doing forensic anthropology in any given state within the U.S. can usually fit within a small classroom. Deans and administration usually don't like for you to harp on that though, because they're making money off the dreams of ...

My whole grad program was a mess, but the icing on the cake was when the Coroner's office said they don't accept applicants with anthro degrees. Considering how many of my peers went into the program with that as their career choice, it seems like the anthro department lied in a big, costly way.
/bitter


Wow. A coroner's office that doesn't take applicants with anthro degrees is shooting itself in the foot unless they've already got someone with an anthro background in house and are telling you that because they feel they don't need another. Sorry you had that experience, but you're definitely not alone in that regard.
 
2014-08-23 11:51:11 PM  

everlastinggobstopper: I just wrapped up a summer field season doing exhumations in a cemetery, check out this article about what we've been up to:

http://gizmodo.com/the-coldest-of-the-cold-cases-using-dna-to-identi fy -ce-1619702295


/getting a kick, etc.


Wow, that is amazingly cool.  I really wish I could have pursued archeology...


raerae1980:

In all seriousness, do you need any more anthropologists/bioarchaeologists for your site? My grad program was terrible and the forensic anthropologist was useless in helping us get established. Hell, you may have heard about her. Or was this strictly volunteer?

Thanks. Frankly, they should eliminate the program, considering how few opportunities there are, versus the costs of attending to get the degrees. I'm just a "little bitter" about the whole thing.

Ill look into it more, thanks again.


And there it is.  I spent a day with a bioarcheologist friend of mine and told him I was thinking of switching to Anthro/Archeo rather than Pharmacy and he told me not to do it.  Sucks, but I will keep volunteering to get my fix I guess.  Sorry the dream is not working out so well so far raerae1980.  I read your posts sometimes and seethe with envy.  I hope you find something good soon.
 
2014-08-24 12:07:38 AM  

ElWampa: ReapTheChaos: Sooner or later we have to give up this obsession we have with our dead. One day we're simply going to run out of space to bury them or the value of the real estate will outweigh the value of the corpses.

They're dead, they ain't coming back. Burn them and spread the ashes in a field someplace.

Pretty much my thoughts on the matter.


Quit making sense on Fark!
 
2014-08-24 06:25:38 AM  
Just move the headstones and leave the bodies what's the worst that can happy.
 
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