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(Guardian)   After 74 years, it may now be safely revealed that a spectacularly inept attempt at 'intelligence gathering' by Nazi Germany on British soil was deliberate sabotage- on the part of the German officer in charge of the fiasco   (theguardian.com) divider line 53
    More: Ironic  
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11489 clicks; posted to Main » on 23 Aug 2014 at 2:47 PM (22 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-08-23 12:26:42 PM  
I'm *SHOCKED* that the Abwehr would be involved in passive-agressive measures against the Nazi regime.  Shocked.
 
2014-08-23 12:38:33 PM  

dittybopper: I'm *SHOCKED* that the Abwehr would be involved in passive-agressive measures against the Nazi regime.  Shocked.


Nice. A Louis Renault reference is perfect for this.
 
2014-08-23 12:59:16 PM  
Dangerous times.
 
2014-08-23 01:09:22 PM  
That actually was a CSB.
 
2014-08-23 02:51:11 PM  
Isn't that when Helen Keller hid in that attic?
 
2014-08-23 02:58:34 PM  

dittybopper: I'm *SHOCKED* that the Abwehr would be involved in passive-agressive measures against the Nazi regime.  Shocked.


A lot of people who don't study history have no idea how anti-nazi some of the Abwehr were, and how they made sure to half-ass things just enough to not get caught.

For those not aware, the German military intelligence service (Abwher) was run by this guy.   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilhelm_Canaris
 
2014-08-23 03:04:40 PM  
Ich bin ein Londoner.
 
2014-08-23 03:10:29 PM  
Another pair were stopped while cycling through Scotland on the wrong side of the road: once the police discovered German sausages and Nivea hand cream in their luggage, their cover was blown.

This sounds like the plot of a gay porno.
 
2014-08-23 03:14:42 PM  
img.fark.net

I'm pretty sure nobody would ever send out spies quite that inept and unfamiliar with local customs.
 
mhd
2014-08-23 03:15:59 PM  
Another pair were stopped while cycling through Scotland on the wrong side of the road: once the police discovered German sausages and Nivea hand cream in their luggage, their cover was blown.

This made my day. Sausages and skin care...
 
2014-08-23 03:23:08 PM  
Antilope
Ich bin ein Londoner.


You sound like a bit off a dick.
www.rastashop.com
 
2014-08-23 03:28:00 PM  
This kind of tactic is still usable today.  I used to do labor negotiations for our (very large) company; sometimes senior management would want to do really really stupid short - term -profit stuff that was good for their bonuses but bad for the company. We would always lose in those Labor negotiations, fighting and arguing bravely...until we lost. We never got caught, or even suspected. Usually, if  Senior management couldn't impose it on the unions, they wouldn't do it to management either. One example where we allowed the union  employees to escape but management got stuck was cutting promotional pay increases from 9% to 2%.

Senior management could never grasp why employees would decline promotions during the next few years, or why so many members of management left the company.
 
2014-08-23 03:34:19 PM  

The Voice of Doom: Antilope
Ich bin ein Londoner.


You sound like a bit off a dick.
[www.rastashop.com image 300x300]


Hmmmm. You're the one that would know all about that. You are so interested in the subject you even had a picture on file.
 
2014-08-23 03:34:22 PM  

mhd: Another pair were stopped while cycling through Scotland on the wrong side of the road: once the police discovered German sausages and Nivea hand cream in their luggage, their cover was blown.

This made my day. Sausages and skin care...


What? His elbows get chapped...
 
2014-08-23 03:37:52 PM  
Same thing happened when the Germans tried landing 'spies' on Long Island by U-Boat....Operation Pastorius   All were quickly caught, all except 2 were executed.   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Pastorius
 
2014-08-23 03:40:52 PM  
Wow, that story goes a long way toward explaining this Monty Python sketch.
 
2014-08-23 04:09:58 PM  
So instead of sending their best and brightest, they sent some underachieving youngsters from some ultra right wing groups, which doomed the operation ... Really hoping history repeats itself on that one

/ok, history doesn't repeat, it rhymes, but you get the idea
 
2014-08-23 04:10:31 PM  

Ghost Roach: So instead of sending their best and brightest, they sent some underachieving youngsters from some ultra right wing groups, which doomed the operation ... Really hoping history repeats itself on that one

/ok, history doesn't repeat, it rhymes, but you get the idea


Yes.
 
2014-08-23 04:10:50 PM  

Fissile: Same thing happened when the Germans tried landing 'spies' on Long Island by U-Boat....Operation Pastorius   All were quickly caught, all except 2 were executed.   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Pastorius


It seems the two in cahoots were treated rather harshly IMO. Cool history lesson bro
 
2014-08-23 04:12:12 PM  

doglover: Another pair were stopped while cycling through Scotland on the wrong side of the road: once the police discovered German sausages and Nivea hand cream in their luggage, their cover was blown.

This sounds like the plot of a gay porno.


The Third Reich slipped into Poland on a slick of Nivea hand cream. Fact.
 
2014-08-23 04:20:41 PM  

Ghost Roach: So instead of sending their best and brightest, they sent some underachieving youngsters from some ultra right wing groups, which doomed the operation ... Really hoping history repeats itself on that one

/ok, history doesn't repeat, it rhymes, but you get the idea


Well, some of that might have also been influenced by their general approach.  Remember that the Germans were still highly influenced by a "Prussian" mentality, and things like spying were looked down upon, a dirty but unfortunately necessary part of war and one that they didn't think they should waste their best and brightest upon.

But obviously they had to do *SOMETHING*.  So they would train their "suitable" candidates for a few weeks and send them on their way.

And they did think they had some reliable agents in the UK, though in fact every single one of the agents that the Germans thought were working for them were being controlled by the British, who let a lot of good information go to the Germans in order to make their agents seem well connected.  One even sent warning to the Germans several *HOURS* before the invasion of Normandy, knowing that it would be seen as confirming he was a real agent, and that a few hours time wasn't enough for the Germans to receive the message, decrypt it, pass it on  to the appropriate military authorities, and to have them put on proper alert.
 
2014-08-23 04:26:10 PM  

Valiente: doglover: Another pair were stopped while cycling through Scotland on the wrong side of the road: once the police discovered German sausages and Nivea hand cream in their luggage, their cover was blown.

This sounds like the plot of a gay porno.

The Third Reich slipped into Poland on a slick of Nivea hand cream. Fact.


Analschluss.
 
2014-08-23 04:34:33 PM  
Wonder if there's any connection to Agent Garbo. (Google it.)
 
2014-08-23 05:00:10 PM  

DrunkWithImpotence: dittybopper: I'm *SHOCKED* that the Abwehr would be involved in passive-agressive measures against the Nazi regime.  Shocked.

A lot of people who don't study history have no idea how anti-nazi some of the Abwehr were, and how they made sure to half-ass things just enough to not get caught.

For those not aware, the German military intelligence service (Abwher) was run by this guy.   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilhelm_Canaris


this. well done. canaris was quite an interesting chap.
 
2014-08-23 05:09:56 PM  
Tufnel le'Que

/now that's obscure
 
2014-08-23 05:18:41 PM  

dittybopper: Ghost Roach: So instead of sending their best and brightest, they sent some underachieving youngsters from some ultra right wing groups, which doomed the operation ... Really hoping history repeats itself on that one

/ok, history doesn't repeat, it rhymes, but you get the idea

Well, some of that might have also been influenced by their general approach.  Remember that the Germans were still highly influenced by a "Prussian" mentality, and things like spying were looked down upon, a dirty but unfortunately necessary part of war and one that they didn't think they should waste their best and brightest upon.

But obviously they had to do *SOMETHING*.  So they would train their "suitable" candidates for a few weeks and send them on their way.

And they did think they had some reliable agents in the UK, though in fact every single one of the agents that the Germans thought were working for them were being controlled by the British, who let a lot of good information go to the Germans in order to make their agents seem well connected.  One even sent warning to the Germans several *HOURS* before the invasion of Normandy, knowing that it would be seen as confirming he was a real agent, and that a few hours time wasn't enough for the Germans to receive the message, decrypt it, pass it on  to the appropriate military authorities, and to have them put on proper alert.


This seems like a relevant thread for you to attend.
 
2014-08-23 05:19:21 PM  
Sees headline...Wilhelm Canaris? Clicks link...yep.

The man was a hero.
 
2014-08-23 05:33:17 PM  
http://www.fark.com/users/DarKrow

Wonder if there's any connection to Agent Garbo. (Google it.)


The British had some incredibly well planned and executed intelligence plans during the war.

For example: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Mincemeat

German agents just didn't seem to have their hearts in it.
 
2014-08-23 05:40:17 PM  

geekbikerskum: Wow, that story goes a long way toward explaining this Monty Python sketch.


Ja, not much fun in Stalingrad.
 
2014-08-23 05:48:00 PM  
"Herbert Wichmann: The Man Who Screwed Hitler" has a nice ring to it. XD
 
2014-08-23 06:03:35 PM  
Foiled by substitutiary locomotion
 
2014-08-23 07:06:04 PM  

HowDidIGetHere: http://www.fark.com/users/DarKrow

Wonder if there's any connection to Agent Garbo. (Google it.)

The British had some incredibly well planned and executed intelligence plans during the war.

For example: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Mincemeat

German agents just didn't seem to have their hearts in it.


I just finished the Audiobook about Operation Mincemeat last week. ;)
 
2014-08-23 07:13:19 PM  

dittybopper: Ghost Roach: So instead of sending their best and brightest, they sent some underachieving youngsters from some ultra right wing groups, which doomed the operation ... Really hoping history repeats itself on that one

/ok, history doesn't repeat, it rhymes, but you get the idea

Well, some of that might have also been influenced by their general approach.  Remember that the Germans were still highly influenced by a "Prussian" mentality, and things like spying were looked down upon, a dirty but unfortunately necessary part of war and one that they didn't think they should waste their best and brightest upon.

But obviously they had to do *SOMETHING*.  So they would train their "suitable" candidates for a few weeks and send them on their way.


Can you recommend a good book on the subject?
 
2014-08-23 07:27:36 PM  
So, the reason why the German spies were such Failboats was "Ich meinte dazu ".
 
2014-08-23 09:02:28 PM  
Canaris and Reinhard Heydrich make an interesting story.

It wouldn't surprise me that Heydrich was killed with the help of Canaris and the Abwehr. Supposedly, Canaris had documents that proved Heydrich had Jewish ancestry. I'm sure they were discovered in his safe with his notes on Operation Valkyrie.

The details of Canaris' execution are heartbreaking.
 
2014-08-23 09:43:23 PM  
I thought it was stopped by Angela Lansbury and a bunch of reanimated knights....

Fano beat me to it.
 
2014-08-23 09:46:48 PM  

dolphinsgonwild: Isn't that when Helen Keller hid in that attic?


Hellen Keller was in her basement discovering Radon.
 
2014-08-23 09:50:32 PM  
Sounds like a sit-com plot.  Hogan!!!!
 
2014-08-23 10:02:51 PM  
Can't believe I'm first vis zhis! Der spies!!
 
2014-08-23 10:45:39 PM  
You know who ELSE. . .

Never mind.
 
2014-08-23 10:48:42 PM  

Clemkadidlefark: Tufnel le'Que

/now that's obscure


Was ist falsch daran sexy?
 
2014-08-23 11:48:54 PM  

DrunkWithImpotence: A lot of people who don't study history have no idea how anti-nazi some of the Abwehr were, and how they made sure to half-ass things just enough to not get caught.


Yeah, and I bet dittybopper can tell us if the times when army nazis initialized their Enigmas with poorly chosen strings like "HIT-LER" and "BER-LIN"  (while the Navy followed better procedures) was purposefully sloppy work by those guys or just idiots being idiots.
 
2014-08-24 12:12:40 AM  
Years ago in an amateur radio magazine was the story of an anti-nazi radio station that would broadcast soccer scores before the newspapers, name the streets that were bombed because they weren't under nazi control.
They were under British control.
They used old street maps and photo recognizance to report what actual radio stations couldn't.

And when the allies invaded, they said the roads were mined where they weren't, and that bridges were undamaged when they were.

Radio 1212?

But the Googles, they do nothing!
 
2014-08-24 12:18:34 AM  

Vlad_the_Inaner: DrunkWithImpotence: A lot of people who don't study history have no idea how anti-nazi some of the Abwehr were, and how they made sure to half-ass things just enough to not get caught.

Yeah, and I bet dittybopper can tell us if the times when army nazis initialized their Enigmas with poorly chosen strings like "HIT-LER" and "BER-LIN"  (while the Navy followed better procedures) was purposefully sloppy work by those guys or just idiots being idiots.


Well, there was the idiot Luftwaffe signals officer who always used his girlfriend's name as the initial calibration word on his transmissions.
 
2014-08-24 12:48:20 AM  
clivedavis.blogs.com
What German agents in England might look like...
/not much fun in Stalingrad, no...
 
2014-08-24 03:33:56 AM  

Lunger42: I thought it was stopped by Angela Lansbury and a bunch of reanimated knights....

Fano beat me to it.


Nah, that was the Korean War.  Frank Sinatra was one of them.
 
2014-08-24 04:43:02 AM  
The discovery of Substitutionary Locomotion had a big hand in it all.
 
2014-08-24 05:35:52 AM  

DarKrow: I just finished the Audiobook about Operation Mincemeat last week. ;)


What book, and was it good?  I'm about to fininsh my current nonfiction selection and Operation Mincemeat is a pretty interesting subject.
 
2014-08-24 11:34:25 AM  

zato_ichi: dittybopper: Ghost Roach: So instead of sending their best and brightest, they sent some underachieving youngsters from some ultra right wing groups, which doomed the operation ... Really hoping history repeats itself on that one

/ok, history doesn't repeat, it rhymes, but you get the idea

Well, some of that might have also been influenced by their general approach.  Remember that the Germans were still highly influenced by a "Prussian" mentality, and things like spying were looked down upon, a dirty but unfortunately necessary part of war and one that they didn't think they should waste their best and brightest upon.

But obviously they had to do *SOMETHING*.  So they would train their "suitable" candidates for a few weeks and send them on their way.

Can you recommend a good book on the subject?


"Hitler's Spies:  German Military Intelligence in World War II" by David Kahn.

http://books.google.com/books?id=FYl11lfqKz4C

David Kahn is one of the best authors on the general subject of codes, ciphers, and signals intelligence.  His book "The Codebreakers" is what inspired me to go into signals intelligence in the first place:  I read it as a young teen and was enthralled by history and concepts of it.

Some of his books that I have read and recommend:

The aforementioned "The Codebreakers":
http://books.google.com/books/about/The_Codebreakers.html?id=SEH_rHk ga ogC

"Seizing the Enigma:  The Race To Break The German U-boat Codes 1939-1945"
http://books.google.com/books?id=KO8crflI8AMC

I have yet to read this one, but it looks damned interesting:

"How I Discovered World War II's Greatest Spy and Other Stories of Intelligence and Code"
http://books.google.com/books?id=35ClAgAAQBAJ
 
2014-08-24 11:37:37 AM  

Radak: DarKrow: I just finished the Audiobook about Operation Mincemeat last week. ;)

What book, and was it good?  I'm about to fininsh my current nonfiction selection and Operation Mincemeat is a pretty interesting subject.


It's actually just called <em>Operation Mincemeat</em>, and it is very good.
 
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