Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Toronto Star)   UK project to make air travel faster ... REAL faster   (thestar.com ) divider line
    More: Interesting, heat exchangers, nuclear power station, liquid hydrogen, external tank, Farnborough Air Show, Concorde, fuselages, speed of sound  
•       •       •

4241 clicks; posted to Geek » on 22 Aug 2014 at 10:40 PM (1 year ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



37 Comments   (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2014-08-22 07:45:31 PM  

mojoimage.com



?

 
2014-08-22 07:55:29 PM  
FTA: ""This is the only engine that we know of which is capable of realizing an aeroplane which can take off, fly into space, do a job, and come back and land. Then, a couple of days later do it all over again to a different orbit or whatever," says Bond. "So that's the excitement of it."

Would be nice if they could manage to clear some of the space junk out of orbit before delivering new payloads.
 
2014-08-22 08:25:54 PM  

gopher321: FTA: ""This is the only engine that we know of which is capable of realizing an aeroplane which can take off, fly into space, do a job, and come back and land. Then, a couple of days later do it all over again to a different orbit or whatever," says Bond. "So that's the excitement of it."

Would be nice if they could manage to clear some of the space junk out of orbit before delivering new payloads.


I think thats what Japan is planning to do with its Space Navy. All I know is that if Japan gets space marines I'm moving there.

But yea, I don't think I have trust with something much faster than current commercial planes and isn't a Single or Dual seater jet.
 
2014-08-22 09:01:01 PM  
billkemp.info
i...like the way...it...looks. something...oddly familiar....
 
2014-08-22 09:24:12 PM  
C'mon scientists, it's been like 75 years and you still haven't found a way to put crap into space apart from chemical rockets.  I know antimatter takes assloads of power to make, but if you just spent the few hundred billion it'd cost to put a solar-powered antimatter generator in orbit around the sun we could not only start star-hopping in antimatter-powered starships, but solve the world's energy crisis as a bonus.

/I guess to be fair, there was that one thing where NASA wanted to fly to Alpha Centauri B by having a ship poop out nuclear bombs behind itself and blow them up to hit double-digit percentages of light speed, but that never really got off the drawing board.
 
2014-08-22 09:53:22 PM  
Has a flying car sort of feel to it. Always looking for new investors, never able to make a working product.
 
2014-08-22 10:42:44 PM  
Did they not have a bit of a problem doing that with the Concord?
 
2014-08-22 10:48:30 PM  
Right, fark lift, more thrust!
 
2014-08-22 10:49:20 PM  
They've been pushing SKYLON variants for years now, and the SABRE engone almost as long, but the UK government hasn't got the will to fund anything regarding it, to a meaningful extent.  The country that could have real versions of Jerry Anderson Thunderbirds craft... is happy with just the puppet versions. Dan has no "Dare".

Also, look at the fuel/payload ratio on a Skylon craft, and it seems impractical to stretch one out to passenger jet size.
 
2014-08-22 10:55:07 PM  
We need International Rescue.
 
2014-08-22 10:58:00 PM  

some_beer_drinker: [billkemp.info image 580x400]
i...like the way...it...looks. something...oddly familiar....


i291.photobucket.com

/great minds
 
2014-08-22 11:17:42 PM  

ReverendJynxed: Right, fark lift, more thrust!


i.imgur.com
 
2014-08-22 11:26:18 PM  
in a nuclear power station, for example, a heat exchanger with similar capacity would be a 200-ton component. In the SABRE engine it's a 1.5 ton component

Seems legit.

www.untoldentertainment.com
 
2014-08-22 11:28:18 PM  
Nice to see the Brits returning to the forefront of aviation.
 
2014-08-22 11:52:59 PM  

gopher321: FTA: ""This is the only engine that we know of which is capable of realizing an aeroplane which can take off, fly into space, do a job, and come back and land. Then, a couple of days later do it all over again to a different orbit or whatever," says Bond. "So that's the excitement of it."

Would be nice if they could manage to clear some of the space junk out of orbit before delivering new payloads.


Bond? Q for Pete's sake. If you're gonna do fanfic get the characters right.
 
2014-08-22 11:57:44 PM  

Thanks for the Meme-ries: /great minds create television shows that other people will steal ideas and designs from and indirectly make billions off of for decades

 
2014-08-23 12:05:07 AM  

Ivo Shandor: ReverendJynxed: Right, fark lift, more thrust!

[i.imgur.com image 640x400]


Sweet Baby Kerbal....
 
2014-08-23 12:06:18 AM  
So...how does Granny stand the acceleration to Mach 5? Or do passengers have to be screened?
 
2014-08-23 12:07:41 AM  
Never. Gonna. Happen. EVAR.
 
2014-08-23 12:08:34 AM  

dookdookdook: C'mon scientists, it's been like 75 years and you still haven't found a way to put crap into space apart from chemical rockets.  I know antimatter takes assloads of power to make, but if you just spent the few hundred billion it'd cost to put a solar-powered antimatter generator in orbit around the sun we could not only start star-hopping in antimatter-powered starships, but solve the world's energy crisis as a bonus.

/I guess to be fair, there was that one thing where NASA wanted to fly to Alpha Centauri B by having a ship poop out nuclear bombs behind itself and blow them up to hit double-digit percentages of light speed, but that never really got off the drawing board.


Well, they HAVE come up with several other ways. It's just that no one is willing to bear the costs associated with them. For example:

- Laser launch sites. Can push big cargo capsules into orbit. Difficulty: A honking big laser and the nuclear power plants (plural) to run  it.
- Electromagnetic Rail boosters. Could give an SSTO (Single Stage to Orbit) vessel a really nice push. Difficulty: Lots of power, very long launch track that has to curve up a largish mountain.
- Space Elevators. The ultimate in cheap "get me to orbit" tech. Difficulty: Material Science not quite there yet, Insanely expensive to build, very bad things happen if it gets blown up by bad people.

So those are just the ones off the top of my head. There are others (including the original project Ortion, with the nuclear bombs as propulsion - very bad inside the atmosphere, but once in space, hey, light it up!)
 
2014-08-23 12:19:05 AM  
Build a tunnel.
 
2014-08-23 12:44:56 AM  

Choestoe: dookdookdook: C'mon scientists, it's been like 75 years and you still haven't found a way to put crap into space apart from chemical rockets.  I know antimatter takes assloads of power to make, but if you just spent the few hundred billion it'd cost to put a solar-powered antimatter generator in orbit around the sun we could not only start star-hopping in antimatter-powered starships, but solve the world's energy crisis as a bonus.

/I guess to be fair, there was that one thing where NASA wanted to fly to Alpha Centauri B by having a ship poop out nuclear bombs behind itself and blow them up to hit double-digit percentages of light speed, but that never really got off the drawing board.

Well, they HAVE come up with several other ways. It's just that no one is willing to bear the costs associated with them. For example:

- Electromagnetic Rail boosters. Could give an SSTO (Single Stage to Orbit) vessel a really nice push. Difficulty: Lots of power, very long launch track that has to curve up a largish mountain.


I've thought about that one myself.  I bet there could be a way to get around the mountain issue if it was built on a large circular track and had a switching mechanism that would send the launch vehicle to an upward facing launch track (sort of like a bike ramp) once it had reached the necessary speed.  There could even be multiple launch ramps to send vehicle into different orbits, with the switching mechanism able to be set to trigger the one necessary for whichever individual mission was being launched.

Yes, it would need a ton of power, and the circular track would have to be huge, but a dedicated nuclear power plant would theoretically be able to produce enough energy to run it.  If it was used often enough it could end up saving money vs traditional rockets.
 
2014-08-23 12:58:14 AM  
"What is that?"

content6.flixster.com
 
2014-08-23 12:58:58 AM  
So instead of a story about the spaceX research rocket that farking blew up today down in texas we get yet another tired rehash of Skylon for the umteenth time in the last 10 years? Well, I guess it's better then no space thread at all.
 
2014-08-23 01:48:50 AM  

TuteTibiImperes: Choestoe: dookdookdook: C'mon scientists, it's been like 75 years and you still haven't found a way to put crap into space apart from chemical rockets.  I know antimatter takes assloads of power to make, but if you just spent the few hundred billion it'd cost to put a solar-powered antimatter generator in orbit around the sun we could not only start star-hopping in antimatter-powered starships, but solve the world's energy crisis as a bonus.

/I guess to be fair, there was that one thing where NASA wanted to fly to Alpha Centauri B by having a ship poop out nuclear bombs behind itself and blow them up to hit double-digit percentages of light speed, but that never really got off the drawing board.

Well, they HAVE come up with several other ways. It's just that no one is willing to bear the costs associated with them. For example:

- Electromagnetic Rail boosters. Could give an SSTO (Single Stage to Orbit) vessel a really nice push. Difficulty: Lots of power, very long launch track that has to curve up a largish mountain.

I've thought about that one myself.  I bet there could be a way to get around the mountain issue if it was built on a large circular track and had a switching mechanism that would send the launch vehicle to an upward facing launch track (sort of like a bike ramp) once it had reached the necessary speed.  There could even be multiple launch ramps to send vehicle into different orbits, with the switching mechanism able to be set to trigger the one necessary for whichever individual mission was being launched.

Yes, it would need a ton of power, and the circular track would have to be huge, but a dedicated nuclear power plant would theoretically be able to produce enough energy to run it.  If it was used often enough it could end up saving money vs traditional rockets.


Not sure of all the details (it's been a while since I read up on this stuff) but I seem to recall that the sloped part had to be fairly long to prevent excessive g forces. But the idea of fifferent orbital insertion angles was mentioned as I recall.
 
2014-08-23 02:09:23 AM  
"You board an aircraft in Toronto or Vancouver. It's got weird-looking engines and much smaller wings than you'd expect. There are no windows. You step off a few hours later - in Australia."

Yeah, but what's that distance in cities the rest of the world knows shiat about?

/I keed
//I heart Canuckistan
 
2014-08-23 05:14:25 AM  
www.reactionengines.co.uk
img3.wikia.nocookie.net

\I see where they got their design idea
 
2014-08-23 05:51:39 AM  

gozar_the_destroyer: [www.reactionengines.co.uk image 450x280]
[img3.wikia.nocookie.net image 850x478]

\I see where they got their design idea


Brontosauruses?
 
2014-08-23 06:33:03 AM  

LewDux: gozar_the_destroyer: [www.reactionengines.co.uk image 450x280]
[img3.wikia.nocookie.net image 850x478]

\I see where they got their design idea

Brontosauruses?


And marital aides thereof with chrome finishes.

\it's like climbing aboard a rocket!
 
2014-08-23 08:33:09 AM  

SquiggsIN: I see where the trilogy that must not be named got their idea too :


From what, Vlad the Impeller?
 
2014-08-23 08:56:22 AM  
You board an aircraft in Toronto or Vancouver. It's got weird-looking engines and much smaller wings than you'd expect. There are no windows. You step off a few hours later - in Australia.

Or so they tell you.  There are NO WINDOWS!  They could be taking you anywhere...or no place at all!  They could be dropping you off at King William Re-education Camp/Death Panelatorium for all you know!!!

Study it out, sheeple!
 
2014-08-23 09:07:03 AM  
I like to ride the semiballistics - the high-gee blastoff that always feels as if the cradle would rupture and spurt fluid all over the cabin, the breathless minutes in free fall that feel as if your guts were falling out, and then reentry and that long, long glide that beats any sky ride ever built. Where can you have more fun in forty minutes with your clothes on?

Then comes the always interesting question: Is the runway clear? A semiballistic doesn't make two passes; it can't.
 
2014-08-23 09:59:30 AM  

DigitalCoffee: Where can you have more fun in forty minutes with your clothes on?


You fap naked?
 
2014-08-23 10:07:02 AM  

BalugaJoe: We need International Rescue.


www.modelcars.com
 
2014-08-23 11:43:51 AM  

dookdookdook: DigitalCoffee: Where can you have more fun in forty minutes with your clothes on?

You fap naked?


Only on Friday.

/didyouseewhatididthere.jpg
 
2014-08-23 12:26:33 PM  

amindofiron: So instead of a story about the spaceX research rocket that farking blew up today down in texas we get yet another tired rehash of Skylon for the umteenth time in the last 10 years? Well, I guess it's better then no space thread at all.


I read the article twice because I thought I missed the part about a recent development but there isn't one. They've apparently made no progress worth reporting.
 
2014-08-23 02:19:36 PM  

dookdookdook: C'mon scientists, it's been like 75 years and you still haven't found a way to put crap into space apart from chemical rockets.  I know antimatter takes assloads of power to make, but if you just spent the few hundred billion it'd cost to put a solar-powered antimatter generator in orbit around the sun we could not only start star-hopping in antimatter-powered starships, but solve the world's energy crisis as a bonus.

/I guess to be fair, there was that one thing where NASA wanted to fly to Alpha Centauri B by having a ship poop out nuclear bombs behind itself and blow them up to hit double-digit percentages of light speed, but that never really got off the drawing board.


the only problem- it can explode due to a defect or get hit by something and explode wasting the money
 
Displayed 37 of 37 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter






In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report