Do you have adblock enabled?
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(The New York Times)   Now the gov't wants your car to text with other cars... this should end well. Subby can't wait to hack it   (nytimes.com) divider line 30
    More: Dumbass, Car Talk, connected car, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration  
•       •       •

3521 clicks; posted to Main » on 21 Aug 2014 at 10:41 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Archived thread
2014-08-21 11:09:06 AM  
3 votes:
It's too bad no one should trust the government anymore. It takes all the "wondrous future" thrill off of ideas like this. They always abuse every single supposedly good thing, from CIA vaccination campaigns to tracking your every move with cell phones. The world would be so much cooler if we could just use things without having to worry about how the government is going to try to fark you with it.
2014-08-21 11:02:02 AM  
3 votes:
This "car mesh" is scary.

It might make sense but it is a slippery slope. You do this first, then you add in communication back to a central point for "traffic performance purposes" and collect data.

The government subpoenas the data, like car black box data, to track the driver in a case or over time on a special case.

Soon, it is "Let's just collect and keep the data" long term to speed the subpoena process.

The cities who are in a budget crunch add in some geolocation and sensors along some of the roads and you are emailed your traffic citation for speeding, failure to come to a complete stop, etc.

Yea, no thanks.
2014-08-21 10:50:01 AM  
3 votes:
Yea, yea, yea.

ETC was going to kill us all. Electronic steering was going to kill us all. OBD-II computers were going to kill us all. Infotainment was going to kill us all.

I don't see why you guys are so worried about car-to-car communications. All the other technical advances of the last forty years already killed us all.
2014-08-21 10:43:24 AM  
3 votes:
I'm loving how the government wants to track cars but pays no farking attention that hackers can and would do worse if they hack the gov'ts servers.

Assholes.
2014-08-21 07:25:32 AM  
3 votes:
Text your speed to that cop sitting at the side of the road?
2014-08-21 12:34:52 PM  
2 votes:
I have mixed feelings about this. On the one hand, car-to-car communication would be great. The ability to propagate information about upcoming hazards and allow the car to act on them would be amazing. If the car in front steps on the brakes, in addition to the brake lights, a signal could be sent to the car in back to slow down. Signals in cars and road signs can set tell a car "here is the speed limit, don't go faster than this", allowing for automatically-adjusting cruise control. The possibilities are endless to the information being sent and how it is acted upon to make a smarter system.

However, as a person who designs systems for a living and has to think about all the ways a design can be defeated and/or abused, the potential for mayhem is really great. The only secure system is an entirely closed system. If a person with a laptop and a $200 Software Radio can theoretically cause crashes and pileups, than the system isn't worth it. You had better convince me that this can't be abused, even then I would probably tell you to stuff it. Any system that would be useful (i.e. control the car faster than a human) would have a huge potential for abuse. Because this is a system that would really only work if all cars on the road would support it, a system of this kind would need specs that are set in stone and would need to have legacy support for 20 years or more. I am more than sure an exploit would be found within 20 years, even it if would mean finding a junker (or a stolen car), ripping the radio out and sending signals to the black box.
2014-08-21 11:45:16 AM  
2 votes:
Isaac's got this:

1) A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.

2) A robot must obey the orders given to it by human beings, except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.

3) A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.

I don't even have cruise control in my cars. I'm old-school that way.

/I moved the dimmer switch back to the floor, thanks to a Plymouth switch I found.
//the radio is mechanical push-button
//so is the shifter (automatic transformer)
///'02 PT Cruiser
///a driver oughta DRIVE!
////VIRGULE, Virgule, virgule, virgule
2014-08-21 11:44:35 AM  
2 votes:

skozlaw: Yea, yea, yea.

ETC was going to kill us all. Electronic steering was going to kill us all. OBD-II computers were going to kill us all. Infotainment was going to kill us all.

I don't see why you guys are so worried about car-to-car communications. All the other technical advances of the last forty years already killed us all.


Yet something as simple as a faulty ignition switch actually IS killing people.
2014-08-21 11:09:57 AM  
2 votes:

basemetal: Text your speed to that cop sitting at the side of the road?


They won't do that.  Pulling over a speeding driver still costs money.  They can maximize $afety by transmitting your speed to computerized receivers that just mail you a ticket without any human intervention.

* Tickets may be contested within 30 days in-person on the 5th Tuesday of every month between the hours of 2 and 3 in the 3rd sub-basement of the capitol building.  To contest your ticket you must bring a cashiers check or money order in the amount of the ticket as a non-refundable appearance fee.  If you are unsuccessful, the ticket must be paid in-person, on the 5th Tuesday of the month, same place, same time, within 30 days, or your license and registration will be suspended.
2014-08-21 10:56:01 AM  
2 votes:
Keep making cars more and more expensive,  so I keep buying more and more used cars that pollute.
2014-08-21 10:52:00 AM  
2 votes:

NutWrench: Transmitters in the vehicles send and receive information 10 times a second: speed, direction, location and other data that automakers and federal regulators hope will usher in a new era of road safety.surveillance.


And people wonder why I drive an older vehicle.
2014-08-21 10:48:07 AM  
2 votes:
Transmitters in the vehicles send and receive information 10 times a second: speed, direction, location and other data that automakers and federal regulators hope will usher in a new era of road safety.surveillance.
2014-08-21 02:34:18 PM  
1 votes:

DROxINxTHExWIND: STOP ALLOWING A GAP! If you and 40 other assholes all drive 6 car lengths behind the car in front of you, at varying intevals along the road, it slows EVERYBODY. Maybe if you were traveling behind at a safe distance and reasonable speed, we'd ALL be able to get past whatever is slowing us down ahead without our speed being reduced to a crawl.


Actually, maintaining large gaps is exactly how you break traffic waves. When everybody leaves enough gap that they can move at the constant, average speed, nobody has to hit their brakes when they encounter the back of the next wave and the pattern slowly distributes to the back and eventually "erases" it.

It's simply an applied example of normal distribution. The wave will grow, peak and then shrink away if everyone participates by creating the appropriate gaps.

Nobody actually does this, of course, because of the rule of "fark those guys behind me".
2014-08-21 02:13:46 PM  
1 votes:
Back around 1974 I'd have found this fascinating, interesting and been excited over it. It would have been an indicator that we were getting closer to the fascinating universe I had read about -- especially in books by Sci-Fi writer Larry Niven.

Today the first things that cross my mind are A) what 'secret' information will such systems gather on drivers, B) how long before someone manages to hack them for whatever reason, C) will some form of GPS program be hidden in the technology for use by law enforcement and D) how many thousands of dollars is this going to increase the price of a car.

I mean, weekly, we're discovering 'hidden' programs in cells and computers that gather and store information on us, car thieves have developed electronic keys to break into high end cars with 'secure' electronic security systems and we've all read the articles about how hackers use baby monitors to check out your home for possible robbing. The same with previously secure wireless security cameras.
We already know about the high end cars which, if stolen, can be tracked by the cops and have their engines shut off by remote control.

Decades ago, police radar guns wound up generating radar detectors, when they switched to laser, out came laser detectors. Around the same time, laser pointers popped up and within a few years or so, morons made them more powerful and started shining them into the cockpits of landing airliners as a 'joke'.

Now, a Mom developed an 'app' for cells, which, when your kids ignore your texts, you can shut their phone off. It also lets you know when they're trying to get it working again.

I had never expected people to so quickly develop ways to corrupt the technology. Nor did I expect TV programs to pop up as expose's (SP) telling everyone how to hack into things such as wireless spots, wireless security systems and baby monitors.
2014-08-21 01:46:38 PM  
1 votes:
For those  saying "I'll just drive an old car", do you really think the gov't is going to let you do that when (not if) the tech is implemented? They'll outlaw driving anything under a certain age, maybe you'll be able to get a special permit for antique cars (and the gov't will decide what constitutes "antique") to be driven only on special occasions.

/that includes your red Barchetta
//good luck eluding the Eyes
2014-08-21 01:44:30 PM  
1 votes:

dittybopper: So you can assume that the mandatory safety improvements cost somewhere in the neighborhood of $3,000 extra in 2014 dollars.


No, you can assume all the consumer-preferred goodies and much larger engine cost that much. An '89 Geo Metro got fantastic mileage because it had a 3-cylinder, 1.0-liter engine that got pushed 50 hp, plus hand-cranked windows, manual steering, 4-speed manual gearbox, no air conditioning, etc. The standard Hyundai Accent today has power everything, AC, cruise control, CD player, etc., and a 138-hp engine. You can't BUY the equivalent of a Geo Metro today, because people don't want cars that are that bare bones. The closest equivalent in '89 to a 2014 Accent would be a loaded Toyota Corolla, which cost about $15 grand then.
2014-08-21 01:19:44 PM  
1 votes:

HAMMERTOE: The fun part: When some hacker manages to crack 10,000,000 cars simultaneously, overrides flash with gibberish, and runs his own program, "Malachi_Crunch.exe", and 10,000,000 cars floor the pedal and center on the yellow lines after about 10 seconds.


That is a long-solved problem.

People have a tendency to forget that their laptop is not the standard by which all computers and software are manufactured. Most of the security problems experienced by general purpose computers do not apply to special-purpose computers because the cost of hardening special-purpose computers is worth undertaking and because they can be specifically designed to limit the scope of changes that can occur to their code.

Your computer is easy to hack because it needs to do lots of completely different things very easily so it's designed to run just about anything that you can get on it with very few checks on where it came from, who put it there or what it actually does. Your car's central control units? Not so much.

Well... in theory, anyway. Whether any individual manufacturer actually follows a sensible development plan is another story, but, then, is that really fundamentally different than them selling a car that the wheel falls off of at high speed because of an error on the assembly line?
2014-08-21 01:11:54 PM  
1 votes:
The fun part: When some hacker manages to crack 10,000,000 cars simultaneously, overrides flash with gibberish, and runs his own program, "Malachi_Crunch.exe", and 10,000,000 cars floor the pedal and center on the yellow lines after about 10 seconds.
2014-08-21 12:47:40 PM  
1 votes:

Mikeyworld: stevenvictx: If we had self driving cars, then we wouldn't need any of this.

Or insurance.

Hah! Even self-driving cars would need insurance, because of human instructions. The cars would have to be certified (and that may be the future anyway) every two years to clear the glitches that wood stack up. How many computers have you seen that work prefectly after 3 years of no maintainance? And what happens when a driver decides to DRIVE?


Quite a few actually. We are not talking about a Windows XP desktop that needs to be reformatted every 6 months. Most of these are embedded systems with fairly simple software that is burned on a ROM (or probably Flash). These are not super complicated systems. Short of having the worst programmers money can buy, and having absolutely no system testing, most of these systems should be more much more reliable than a desktop computer.
2014-08-21 12:21:31 PM  
1 votes:
Higher-end cars are already incorporating those features. Infiniti makes a car that automatically brakes when when a car in front of you brakes, and it doesn't even have to be the one directly in front of you. It can also detect the car in front of that one.
2014-08-21 12:12:58 PM  
1 votes:
OMG, WTF get out the left lane you slow POS.
2014-08-21 11:57:34 AM  
1 votes:

Leopold Stotch: Yet something as simple as a faulty ignition switch actually IS killing people.


A mechanical failure. The cause of every crash before electronics (aside from driver errors, anyway). "Oh, we can't have ETC! What happens when the computer fails and locks it to WOT!?".

I dunno. What happened when the return spring in the throttle body seized and did the same thing?

People have been clutching their pearls about automated and electronic vehicle systems since at least the first mass-produced automatic transmission. It's absurd. There have been good ideas and bad ideas over the years, but when it comes to cars the automatic reaction to pretty much EVERY idea is to scream about how it's the worst thing ever. It's just silly.

TheGogmagog: I wonder about that GM recall. Who dies because they lost power steering?


That wasn't the fundamental problem. When the ignition is off it prevents the airbag from deploying, so if something happens that leads to a crash AND cuts the ignition, the people up front are boned.
2014-08-21 11:49:44 AM  
1 votes:
What about cyclists?  They should all be required to have this so my car knows when one is speeding down the hill and about to blow the stop sign next to me.

/Am I doin it right?
2014-08-21 11:48:45 AM  
1 votes:

TheGogmagog: bunner: skozlaw: He worried in regards to a population of which 2/3 owns a smart phone on a website that includes ad tracking and Google services from an Internet connection that is, in all likelihood, being scooped by the NSA.

I hate to break it to you, that barn door ain't closing.

"We know everything you do, every second of every day and it updates in real time!  Every penny you have, what you eat, what you buy, where you buy it, where you go and when and who you go to meet!"

"Huh, so what do you guys do with all this?"

"We sit.. here and.. we.. watch and listen and.. record... all this stuff."

"Every day?"

"Yeah."

"So, that's pretty much your entire life, then?"

"... YESSSSSS *sob*"

Granted no one is sitting watching your movements.  But get shot by a cop?  We'll go through your history and find out why you deserved to be shot.


No, there's no guy with binoculars sitting on your roof, but they don't have to.  We do all the work for them and they just open the data pipe.  Looking at you, Zuckerberg.
2014-08-21 11:48:04 AM  
1 votes:

Leopold Stotch: skozlaw: Yea, yea, yea.

ETC was going to kill us all. Electronic steering was going to kill us all. OBD-II computers were going to kill us all. Infotainment was going to kill us all.

I don't see why you guys are so worried about car-to-car communications. All the other technical advances of the last forty years already killed us all.

Yet something as simple as a faulty ignition switch actually IS killing people.


I wonder about that GM recall.  Who dies because they lost power steering?

/CSB  My GM car tried to start when I left the keys hanging in the ignition far enough out so it wouldn't ding because the door was open.
2014-08-21 11:42:05 AM  
1 votes:
"So, you were fine with driving slow a few seconds ago but now that you see me trying to pass you it's time to speed up?"
2014-08-21 11:26:28 AM  
1 votes:
I could see some waze to make that work in my favor.
img.fark.net

/I've come to terms that the odds are everything I do is recorded in one way or another.  Might as well take advantage of it.
2014-08-21 11:12:26 AM  
1 votes:
skozlaw: Yea, yea, yea.

ETC was going to kill us all. Electronic steering was going to kill us all. OBD-II computers were going to kill us all. Infotainment was going to kill us all.

I don't see why you guys are so worried about car-to-car communications
government. All the other technicalcorporation advances of the last forty years already killed us all.


"At a government-sponsored pilot program ... and a consortium of eight automakers ..."

Ya'll blame the puppet for everything. (Pay no attention to those eight corporations behind the curtain.)


"The current pattern suggests much lobbying is done by corporations, although a wide variety of coalitions representing diverse groups is possible." Wiki

Possible? Hahahahahahahahahahahaha. Hahahahaha. Haha.
2014-08-21 10:48:47 AM  
1 votes:
I for one welcome our brave new world where critical thinking, motor skills and spatial perception are totally teh oldz0rs and unnecessary.
2014-08-21 10:44:12 AM  
1 votes:
basemetal

Text your speed to that cop sitting at the side of the road?


And when you don't completely stop, ect.. you know for $aftey.
 
Displayed 30 of 30 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
Advertisement
On Twitter






In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report