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(Christian Science Monitor)   40 years after it was discovered, and 20 years after scientists figured out which end was which, the bizarre fossil Hallucigenia finds a place in the tree of life   (csmonitor.com) divider line 13
    More: Interesting, Cambrian Explosion, Burgess Shale, arthropods, family trees, evolutionary history, Other Wacky Cambrian Creatures, Swedish Museum of Natural History, Earth Science  
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4142 clicks; posted to Geek » on 20 Aug 2014 at 12:14 PM (44 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



13 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-08-20 11:10:44 AM  
 
2014-08-20 12:18:08 PM  
Oblig "Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn"
 
2014-08-20 12:18:16 PM  

DjangoStonereaver: The Burgess Shales are proof that God was dropping acid long before he created the platypus.


2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-08-20 12:26:53 PM  
Also a pretty solid Lowest of the Low album.

image2.archambault.ca
 
2014-08-20 12:47:47 PM  

Uzzah: Also a pretty solid Lowest of the Low album.

[image2.archambault.ca image 500x500]


You beat me to it.
 
2014-08-20 03:05:13 PM  
Nothing in this article was new.  That Hallucigenia belongs with the Onychophora and the position of that phylum WRT arthropods and tardigrades has been in wikipedia for a long time now.
 
2014-08-20 05:18:53 PM  

flondrix: Nothing in this article was new.  That Hallucigenia belongs with the Onychophora and the position of that phylum WRT arthropods and tardigrades has been in wikipedia for a long time now.


You are correct, and this has been known since people recognized the split between Lophotrochozoans and Ecdysozoans. However, there still are some hangers on to the old taxonomy; Wikipedia just reflects the consensus of new work. There are plenty of zoologists near retirement who would find this work surprising (if they believed it, which they refuse to do).
 
2014-08-20 05:28:38 PM  
This has bothered me for years.  Now I can rest easy.
 
Skr
2014-08-20 07:17:05 PM  
I always forget about the Tardigrades. awww so adorable.

www.strapya-world.com
 
2014-08-20 07:28:05 PM  
Tardigrades will outlive humanity and possibly the destruction of the Earth.
 
2014-08-20 08:16:13 PM  
Those scientists took 20+ years?...
...never checking for suspects on the already-existing spiny centipede/caterpillar branches?

www.pattayamail.com
 
2014-08-20 08:38:35 PM  

Valiente: Tardigrades will outlive humanity and possibly the destruction of the Earth.


If there aren't Tardigrades on Mars right now I'd be shocked.
 
2014-08-21 01:38:17 AM  

nanim: Those scientists took 20+ years?...
...never checking for suspects on the already-existing spiny centipede/caterpillar branches?

[www.pattayamail.com image 300x195]


Insects didn't really come along until about a 100 million years later. Even bona fide centipedes didn't show up until the late Silurian.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prehistoric_insects
 
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