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(Fox News)   US troops now have personal air conditioning units, are still slightly less of a threat to the ozone layer than the average New Jersey woman's hairspray cloud   ( foxnews.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Bruce Cadarette, LWECS, core temperatures, System Center, Engineering Center, ScienceBlogs, air conditionings, Institute of Environmental Medicine  
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2026 clicks; posted to Geek » on 19 Aug 2014 at 11:32 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



20 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-08-19 09:15:19 AM  
Wake me up when they have personal shields.....
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2014-08-19 10:07:20 AM  
I want this.
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2014-08-19 10:30:42 AM  
Astronauts use something like to keep spacesuits cool.  You can also get vests that have a phase change material in them that can be "frozen" in a refrigerator and will keep you cool for several hours.
 
2014-08-19 11:13:47 AM  
"It's the same technology that's in your air conditioner or in your refrigerator, except instead of conditioning air, it chills a fluid. And then it pumps that fluid through a tube-lined cooling vest,"

Wow, we're one step closer to the Battletech universe.
 
2014-08-19 11:37:14 AM  
Why run it on batteries? It's for air crews, can't they just plug into the aircraft's electrical system?
 
2014-08-19 11:39:29 AM  

cgraves67: Why run it on batteries? It's for air crews, can't they just plug into the aircraft's electrical system?


Article addresses that:

Such onboard cooling devices are equipped with tethers that soldiers need to attach themselves to in order to cool down. But moving around the back of a cramped helicopter on a tether is no easy feat, the researchers said. The new, tether-free system is expected to resolve this and other issues associated with staying cool mid-flight.

Basically, if you're moving around a lot, the last thing you want is a cord to trip over.
 
2014-08-19 11:45:24 AM  

RedPhoenix122: cgraves67: Why run it on batteries? It's for air crews, can't they just plug into the aircraft's electrical system?

Article addresses that:

Such onboard cooling devices are equipped with tethers that soldiers need to attach themselves to in order to cool down. But moving around the back of a cramped helicopter on a tether is no easy feat, the researchers said. The new, tether-free system is expected to resolve this and other issues associated with staying cool mid-flight.

Basically, if you're moving around a lot, the last thing you want is a cord to trip over.


Especially if there are spinning blades in the area.
 
2014-08-19 11:48:09 AM  

cgraves67: Why run it on batteries? It's for air crews, can't they just plug into the aircraft's electrical system?


One thing the article doesn't get into is that a personal air conditioner needs a lot less power than a environmental control unit, so that a battery pack is sufficient.  The article says the battery can deliver 120 Watts but I doubt it needs to do it continously.
 
2014-08-19 11:53:43 AM  

FirstNationalBastard: RedPhoenix122: cgraves67: Why run it on batteries? It's for air crews, can't they just plug into the aircraft's electrical system?

Article addresses that:

Such onboard cooling devices are equipped with tethers that soldiers need to attach themselves to in order to cool down. But moving around the back of a cramped helicopter on a tether is no easy feat, the researchers said. The new, tether-free system is expected to resolve this and other issues associated with staying cool mid-flight.

Basically, if you're moving around a lot, the last thing you want is a cord to trip over.

Especially if there are spinning blades in the area.


Or an open door.
 
2014-08-19 11:54:35 AM  

Walker: Wake me up when they have personal shields.....
[upload.wikimedia.org image 450x192]


Too risky. Darpa already has lasguns.
 
2014-08-19 11:56:48 AM  
I would pay real money for such a thing. This climate does not agree with my evolutionary preferences. :(

/also, I need it for part of my powered armor
 
2014-08-19 01:01:17 PM  
I'll believe it when NASCAR starts using them. Or are they already ?
 
2014-08-19 01:57:33 PM  
Got one.  They work pretty well.
 
2014-08-19 02:05:28 PM  

aerojockey: cgraves67: Why run it on batteries? It's for air crews, can't they just plug into the aircraft's electrical system?

One thing the article doesn't get into is that a personal air conditioner needs a lot less power than a environmental control unit, so that a battery pack is sufficient.  The article says the battery can deliver 120 Watts but I doubt it needs to do it continously.


Almost certainly needs to do it continously.  ~120Watts is more or less what you would expect an average farker to emit over the course of a day (3000 cal/day), and I would expect that the stress of flying a helicopter would burn more.  Can't guess the efficiency of the AC, but it isn't a Peltier device [too inefficient] and I'm surprised that such a small AC unit could have higher efficiency (due to "heat pump effect").
 
2014-08-19 02:50:31 PM  
a57.foxnews.com
img.fark.net

Great, now they can hold out until the Adeptus Astartes show up.

\Dakka, dakka!
 
2014-08-19 02:59:35 PM  

yet_another_wumpus: aerojockey: cgraves67: Why run it on batteries? It's for air crews, can't they just plug into the aircraft's electrical system?

One thing the article doesn't get into is that a personal air conditioner needs a lot less power than a environmental control unit, so that a battery pack is sufficient.  The article says the battery can deliver 120 Watts but I doubt it needs to do it continously.

Almost certainly needs to do it continously.  ~120Watts is more or less what you would expect an average farker to emit over the course of a day (3000 cal/day), and I would expect that the stress of flying a helicopter would burn more.  Can't guess the efficiency of the AC, but it isn't a Peltier device [too inefficient] and I'm surprised that such a small AC unit could have higher efficiency (due to "heat pump effect").


http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/metabolic-heat-persons-d_706.html

Pretty good guess on the body heat. As for the pump, it is probably a centripetal pump using normal Rankine cycle for the primary loop to cool the liquid pumped through the vest in a secondary loop.
 
2014-08-19 05:17:21 PM  

aerojockey: cgraves67: Why run it on batteries? It's for air crews, can't they just plug into the aircraft's electrical system?

One thing the article doesn't get into is that a personal air conditioner needs a lot less power than a environmental control unit, so that a battery pack is sufficient.  The article says the battery can deliver 120 Watts but I doubt it needs to do it continously.


Pretty sure that they are using Pelletier junctions to do the work... no compressors or Freon involved.. the only moving parts would be the heat sink fan and the fluid pump...
 
2014-08-19 05:53:52 PM  

OlderGuy: Pretty sure that they are using Pelletier junctions to do the work... no compressors or Freon involved.. the only moving parts would be the heat sink fan and the fluid pump...


The article says "the same technology as your air conditioner". You can get small battery-powered compressors like the one in this picnic cooler. The suits would just need to replace the plate evaporator with a heat exchanger to chill the circulating fluid.

Peltier devices could work in theory, but they have terrible efficiency.
 
2014-08-19 07:36:53 PM  

Ivo Shandor: OlderGuy: Pretty sure that they are using Pelletier junctions to do the work... no compressors or Freon involved.. the only moving parts would be the heat sink fan and the fluid pump...

The article says "the same technology as your air conditioner". You can get small battery-powered compressors like the one in this picnic cooler. The suits would just need to replace the plate evaporator with a heat exchanger to chill the circulating fluid.

Peltier devices could work in theory, but they have terrible efficiency.


Interesting.. need to do some research.. we have Pelletier junctions on some mini- fermenters that seemed to have low performance.. stripped them down and found cakes of thermal paste... and some DOA chips from that situation.. did some serious cleaning and used the same procedure as installing CPUs... and they had the fans reversed...  run them for five minutes now and the cool side heatsink sweats....
 
2014-08-19 08:02:14 PM  

yet_another_wumpus: aerojockey: cgraves67: Why run it on batteries? It's for air crews, can't they just plug into the aircraft's electrical system?

One thing the article doesn't get into is that a personal air conditioner needs a lot less power than a environmental control unit, so that a battery pack is sufficient.  The article says the battery can deliver 120 Watts but I doubt it needs to do it continously.

Almost certainly needs to do it continously.  ~120Watts is more or less what you would expect an average farker to emit over the course of a day (3000 cal/day), and I would expect that the stress of flying a helicopter would burn more.  Can't guess the efficiency of the AC, but it isn't a Peltier device [too inefficient] and I'm surprised that such a small AC unit could have higher efficiency (due to "heat pump effect").


The AC wouldn't need to transfer all of that--in fact it wouldn't be able to unless it covered the whole body.

According to Wikipedia a Li-ion battery can get up to about 250 W-h/kg, so for two hour usage you'd need a battery of about a kg to run it continuously.  MIght be reasonable.  I'd still guess that it turns on and off by demand (like a refrigerator).
 
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