Do you have adblock enabled?
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Short List)   When adaptations deviate from the books and cause unbearable smugness   (shortlist.com) divider line 42
    More: Interesting  
•       •       •

2678 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 19 Aug 2014 at 11:08 AM (40 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



42 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-08-19 10:05:14 AM  
Two recent entries:

World War Z
Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter

Both books were great (really appreciated how they wove factual history with fiction in Abe Lincoln), yet both movies were major letdowns that had almost nothing in common with the books.
 
2014-08-19 10:44:16 AM  
Bambi:

Cut out the parts where Bambi's mother abandons him for hours because she's sick of his shiat and just wants to go fark Bambi's dad.

Cut out the part about Faline's fawn brother Gobo is shot in the same attack that Bambi's mother dies in, and is captured and tamed.  Then later, having been set free when he grew up and having lost his fear of humans, trots out to a gory death the next time a hunter shows up.

Cut out the part where Bambi's dad shows him the corpse of a hunter with a bullet in his skull to teach him that humans are mortal just like they are.

Cut out the part where Bambi turns into a bitter, reclusive, crippled loner after getting shot and dumps Faline, and spends the rest of his life alone after his dad dies.


Adds in a lot of bullshiat where Bambi is besties with all the forest animals, gunshot wounds heal instantly, and everyone lives happily ever after.

Also, the word "twitterpated" never appears once.
 
2014-08-19 11:30:03 AM  
While usually the book is better than the movie, I agree that some of the changes made to "Fight Club" were better in the movie than the book. Another one that I thought was better than the book was Neil Gaiman's "Stardust." The movie was a fun, "Midnight Run" style fantasy, whereas I thought the book, especially the ending, was kind of bleak. The two that bug me the most though were the third and fifth Harry Potter movies. Those two were my favorites, but they were the worst adapted! In the film it's never stated why Lupin knew the map was a map or that James was also an animagus (a fact that is never mentioned in ANY of the movies). The fifth one Umbridge was played more for laughs rather than how she was written in the book.
 
2014-08-19 11:34:50 AM  
Contact, where they cut out the whole bit at the end where Ellie is not only part of an international team, but she also proves their story by following up on a tip provided to her by the alien representative that there is basically a message from God hidden deep inside digits of Pi. It basically ties up the debate through the story about if the best way to find God is through faith or reason. All the religious discussions between her and McConaughey are kind of pointless without that stinger at the end.
 
2014-08-19 11:36:02 AM  
what if the adaptations are better than the books?
 
2014-08-19 11:45:18 AM  

Richard_The_Clown: Another one that I thought was better than the book was Neil Gaiman's "Stardust." The movie was a fun, "Midnight Run" style fantasy, whereas I thought the book, especially the ending, was kind of bleak.


I really liked the ending of the book (which I originally bought as a set of comics with the text accompanied by Charles Vess illustrations) myself because it not only had a bittersweet ending, but there was also a more interesting solution to the conflict (the witch couldn't take her heart when she caught up to the star because by then her heart had already been lost to Tristram), but I can see where it just didn't work for a big budget movie that needs the 3rd act running around and fighting.
 
2014-08-19 12:04:46 PM  
The Mothman Prophecies.... not even close to the movie. The book was more of a "true story" of what happened in WV around the time the "Mothman" was seen. The movie even moved up the collapse of the bridge by several decades.

Honestly though, the movie was better. The author of the book was apparently paid by the word.
 
2014-08-19 12:10:20 PM  
TFA: Finally, the term "Blade Runner" is never actually used by Philip K. Dick, but was coined exclusively for the film.

Wrong! "Blade Runner" comes from a William S. Burroughs book. The film even acknowledges that in the credits. And speaking of Burroughs, Naked Lunch is also a film that deviates wildly from the book.
 
zez
2014-08-19 12:13:04 PM  
How was this not on the list?

encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com
 
2014-08-19 12:18:56 PM  

zez: How was this not on the list?

[encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com image 308x163]


Of course, given the meta nature of the movie, it's actually about the fact that it deviates from the book.
 
2014-08-19 12:26:51 PM  
I read The Shining before watching Kubrick's version.  Sorry, but I didn't care for it.  The mini-series where Steven Weber played John Torrance matched the book and made much more sense of the material.
 
2014-08-19 12:30:28 PM  

pute kisses like a man: what if the adaptations are better than the books?


Impossible!

Of course, ask any book lover about any adaptation, and they'll whine that it's not "faithful", no matter how close it is.

/looking at you, ASoIaF fans
 
2014-08-19 12:37:16 PM  

pute kisses like a man: what if the adaptations are better than the books?


Wherever that listicle is, American Psycho better be #1
 
GBB
2014-08-19 01:12:31 PM  
This is why I don't read the book.
Oh look, a best seller that everyone is reading and talking about that will eventually become a movie.  Yeah, I'll just wait for the movie and enjoy it while I listen to everyone else bellyache about how disappointed they are.
 
2014-08-19 01:12:56 PM  
Pretty much any Bourne movie is going to be better than the book.

And Stephen King, whose most famous work ends in a prepubescent gangbang that saves the town, has some nerve calling out Stanley Kubrick for misogyny.
 
kth
2014-08-19 01:15:54 PM  
Wizard of Earthsea.

I was sooooo excited for that, as the book was my favorite book as a child. It was terrible, and pretty much had a wildly different premise.

I bailed midway, but I can't imagine it got any better.

/now I want to go read the series again...
 
2014-08-19 01:19:08 PM  

pute kisses like a man: what if the adaptations are better than the books?


Then you're too stupid to grasp the subtlety and sheer genius of true literature... or something.

/liked the John Cusack "High Fidelity" better than the Hornby novel
 
2014-08-19 01:19:56 PM  
Hey Guyz!  What's going on in this thread?
theforexchampionship.com
 
2014-08-19 01:22:39 PM  

A10Mechanic: Hey Guyz!  What's going on in this thread?
[theforexchampionship.com image 600x355]


www.oschti.ch

Would you like to know more about what's going on in this thread?
 
2014-08-19 01:24:18 PM  

upload.wikimedia.org

 
2014-08-19 01:30:39 PM  
L.A. Confidential:
while part of the film's climax actually takes place in the book's prologue

Definitely one of the more impressive and exciting beginnings I have ever read.
 
2014-08-19 01:36:48 PM  

FLMountainMan: And Stephen King, whose most famous work ends in a prepubescent gangbang that saves the town


Que?
 
2014-08-19 01:47:17 PM  

Mr_Fabulous: FLMountainMan: And Stephen King, whose most famous work ends in a prepubescent gangbang that saves the town

Que?


upload.wikimedia.org
 
2014-08-19 01:54:15 PM  
the running man, by stephen king, has almost nothing in common with the movie except the name of the main character.
 
2014-08-19 01:57:48 PM  

Mad_Radhu: Mr_Fabulous: FLMountainMan: And Stephen King, whose most famous work ends in a prepubescent gangbang that saves the town

Que?

[upload.wikimedia.org image 302x442]


Prepubescent gangbang?
 
2014-08-19 01:59:23 PM  

enderthexenocide: the running man, by stephen king, has almost nothing in common with the movie except the name of the main character.


I really wish they'd do an actual adaptation of that story.  And the Long Walk, and Rage.  King's best works.
 
2014-08-19 02:03:26 PM  

thamike: Mad_Radhu: Mr_Fabulous: FLMountainMan: And Stephen King, whose most famous work ends in a prepubescent gangbang that saves the town

Que?

[upload.wikimedia.org image 302x442]

Prepubescent gangbang?


It's really in there.
When you think of the book as being about the end of childhood, it sort of makes sense.  One of the things that generally signals this, is having sex.  Once you start doing that, you really aren't a kid anymore and you tend to leave the trappings of childhood behind.
Though, i can't say my childhood ended in running train on my group's female friend.  Not even sure I would have wanted that.
 
2014-08-19 02:06:24 PM  
In The Natural, Roy Hobbs was a jerk and struck out in the end.

/or so I've heard.
 
2014-08-19 02:21:44 PM  
I thought "Last of the Mohicans" movie was much better than the novel, and I usually love classical literature.
 
2014-08-19 02:24:31 PM  
The Sum of All Fears. I hate how they made the Muslim extremists into NeoNazis. I hate how they nuked Baltimore instead of Denver. I thought Liev Schriever was a horrible John Clark.
 
2014-08-19 02:42:51 PM  
What about the Giver? I know the book itself would have made for a thin movie but the trailer bugs the crap out of me.  I'm not going to see it but interested in other opinions. Also Dinotopia; I loved those books as a kid. The tv movie was completely off base.

I find that if I read the book first, chances are I won't like the movie. However, if I see the movie first, I'm more capable of appreciating the merits of each of them.
 
2014-08-19 02:48:59 PM  
50 Shades of Gray hopefully sticks true to the novel.  And hopefully they have gotten Gottfried to narrate.
 
2014-08-19 03:07:02 PM  
upload.wikimedia.org upload.wikimedia.org

The only thing the movie had in common with the book was the names of a couple of the characters.

/Nobody wanted to watch Andrew McCarthy giving a BJ anyway
 
2014-08-19 03:08:08 PM  

bborchar: pute kisses like a man: what if the adaptations are better than the books?

Impossible!

Of course, ask any book lover about any adaptation, and they'll whine that it's not "faithful", no matter how close it is.

/looking at you, ASoIaF fans


yeah, i was actually thinking expressly about game of thrones and tru blood.

now, song of fire and ice may have more stuff going on plotwise, but I think the writing could use a good editor.  gone are the days of beowulfian digressions (of which, beowulf is over 50% digression -- and people this whole time think it's about 2 monsters and a dragon.  wrong, it's about the pendent which may be the ring) and homerian getting dressed scenes (which is important, because heroes get dressed, and that matters, because homer).

for, in those two examples, it was a beautiful song.  so even longwinded, it was euphonic.

song of fire and ice is narrative prose with no real euphony.  with narrative prose, you want a more engaging writing style.  you lack the beauty of poetry, you should have the beauty of perfection (and perfection is never long... for example, my post sucks donkey balls, it's way too long.  i obviously have no respect for my reader, because I should have been able to say this all in one sentence.... oh, would that i were a good writer...)
 
2014-08-19 03:32:33 PM  

thamike: enderthexenocide: the running man, by stephen king, has almost nothing in common with the movie except the name of the main character.

I really wish they'd do an actual adaptation of that story.  And the Long Walk, and Rage.  King's best works.


Rage would be both too mundane and too shocking (school shootings are common place, but we don't like seeing them on screen).
Long Walk would be hard to capture.  It's walking, brisk walking, and might move too slow.  But I love that story.
 
2014-08-19 03:36:22 PM  

Tyrone Slothrop: TFA: Finally, the term "Blade Runner" is never actually used by Philip K. Dick, but was coined exclusively for the film.

Wrong! "Blade Runner" comes from a William S. Burroughs book. The film even acknowledges that in the credits. And speaking of Burroughs, Naked Lunch is also a film that deviates wildly from the book.


27.media.tumblr.com

I can think of at least two things wrong with that title.
 
2014-08-19 03:50:49 PM  
Excellent movie, but vastly different from the book in almost every way:

www.originofcool.com
 
2014-08-19 03:58:37 PM  

puckrock2000: [upload.wikimedia.org image 300x473] [upload.wikimedia.org image 255x378]

The only thing the movie had in common with the book was the names of a couple of the characters.

/Nobody wanted to watch Andrew McCarthy giving a BJ anyway


I actually enjoyed both the book and the movie, but for different reasons.  The movie wasn't great or anything, but Robert Downey Jr. is very compelling at essentially playing himself at the time.  I used to be a huge fan of Bret Easton Ellis, but in general, the movie adaptations of his books are never very good to me.  I thought the American Psycho movie was particularly disappointing even though it might be one of the better movies.  It just felt like something was missing.  Although I haven't seen it since it was in the theaters so maybe I would change my mind now.  The Informers movie was just downright awful and made me question whether I really related to his books anymore.  Maybe I outgrew them.  I actually stopped reading him after Glamorama anyway.
 
2014-08-19 05:07:23 PM  
I started one of Phillip K. Dick's books, The Man in the High Castle, multiple times and never could get into it.

I finally gave Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep a try, and they aren't kidding about it being quite different than the movie. Blade Runner is visually stunning, but it's plot changes are not an improvement over the original.
 
2014-08-19 08:47:56 PM  

scottydoesntknow: Two recent entries:

World War Z
Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter

Both books were great (really appreciated how they wove factual history with fiction in Abe Lincoln), yet both movies were major letdowns that had almost nothing in common with the books.


I haven't read AL:VH, but I have read World War Z and can say the movie was much better than the book, if only because the book was very boring.

It was like reading a transcript, which was certainly novel, but left every scene flat in terms of characterization and pacing.
 
2014-08-20 12:08:25 AM  

GBB: This is why I don't read the book.
Oh look, a best seller that everyone is reading and talking about that will eventually become a movie.  Yeah, I'll just wait for the movie and enjoy it while I listen to everyone else bellyache about how disappointed they are.


I sometimes read books that are from within my favored genre's.

Typically, I do see a lot of changes, and as mentioned in the fight club example, they just work better that way.  Each medium has it's different rules of what you can and can't really do to characters within the context of that story and the people likely to see it in that medium.

However, I will bellyache about atrocities such as Starship Troopers, even if it ends up being a decent movie in its own right.  If it is really only tied to the source material in name, or loosely based on, we should have a special sort of category or warning.

Suggestions...:
Based on:  Fight Club would go in this category.  To Kill a Mockingbird.  Some characters are shifted, some messages a bit different, but there is a fair resemblance to the book and it's overall plot/message.  Clockwork Orange(despite the film missing the last chapter).  Fairly faithful to source material, the few changes do change a lot, but still overall in the same spirit of the majority of the books.  Forrest Gump(we wouldn't exactly send a retard like that into space, so that's a good out-take) changes, for example, were apt to make it a somewhat easier to suspend disbelief.

Sometimes a good book would have been a great book, if it weren't for that odd wrap up or errant tangent the author included when high.  And the inverse is true, sometimes a good adaptation would have been great if the execs would have backed off just a smidge to let nephew have a role that wasn't in the book, or give more lines to a character by hybridizing two characters from the book into one.

Inspired by: This would be the more drastic changes while still trying to meet a few of the book's more important parts.  Several from the list would go here.  Toning down violence or darkness for a more conservative audience, or taking liberties and ramping it up.....  LA Confidential.  I know what you did last summer. Blade Runner.

While most of these changes do make sense in some way or another, they do have a larger impact and lead to a wider differential from the source material, be it a slightly difference in mood or message.

Reimaginings: This is your total transformations or wildly different messages / plots.  Starship Troopers would be here.  Same characters in name, same enemies, and some of the same events, but total transformation of theme and messages.  Running Man is a good one.    This category is populated with a lot of branding, not so much concern for source material, as long as some things kind of sort of match up.  You often see a generic script retrofitted and shoe-horned to fit under a known title / franchise.
 
2014-08-20 01:31:06 PM  

Santa's_Dog: thamike: Mad_Radhu: Mr_Fabulous: FLMountainMan: And Stephen King, whose most famous work ends in a prepubescent gangbang that saves the town

Que?

[upload.wikimedia.org image 302x442]

Prepubescent gangbang?

It's really in there.
When you think of the book as being about the end of childhood, it sort of makes sense.  One of the things that generally signals this, is having sex.  Once you start doing that, you really aren't a kid anymore and you tend to leave the trappings of childhood behind.
Though, i can't say my childhood ended in running train on my group's female friend.  Not even sure I would have wanted that.


The last book of Pullman's HIS DARK MATERIALS trilogy does this idea much, much better. The main characters are very, very young and they engage in their first sexual experience as a way of illustrating one of his main points that innocence is just a euphemism for ignorance and that one cannot fully engage with life and be a complete person while attaching importance to ignorance.
 
Displayed 42 of 42 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
Advertisement
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report