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(Yahoo)   Microsoft has pulled the link to Windows 8.1, as the update was causing more problems than it was fixing   (uk.news.yahoo.com ) divider line
    More: Obvious, Windows 8.1 August Update, window, Windows 8.1, IBTimes UK, security updates  
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3014 clicks; posted to Geek » on 18 Aug 2014 at 6:30 PM (1 year ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-08-18 05:20:34 PM  
What a surprise!
 
2014-08-18 06:31:19 PM  
Does anyone have the original?
 
2014-08-18 06:33:50 PM  

Empty H: Does anyone have the original?


/therock.jpg
 
2014-08-18 06:39:07 PM  
Not all of Windows 8.1, subtard. Just the August patches.
 
2014-08-18 06:53:40 PM  
Listen, I realize this isn't the popular opinion here. But Windows 8 and especially 8.1 runs just fine when you stop using the metro interface, or replace it. The "public face" isn't great, but the OS as a whole is actually really nice. I would pretty much insist it be my windows OS if I were to build a new gaming pc before their next release.


/puts on the nomex suit
 
2014-08-18 06:53:41 PM  
*snicker*
 
2014-08-18 07:06:04 PM  

thecactusman17: Listen, I realize this isn't the popular opinion here. But Windows 8 and especially 8.1 runs just fine when you stop using the metro interface, or replace it. The "public face" isn't great, but the OS as a whole is actually really nice. I would pretty much insist it be my windows OS if I were to build a new gaming pc before their next release.


/puts on the nomex suit


Hmmm. I don't read where the update caused problems solely in the Metro interface. I have the updates installed on both of our home laptops (one 7 and one 8.1) and no issues. So off to the interwebs for more research. Or should I just PANIC?
 
2014-08-18 07:09:50 PM  
Most likely they outsourced the development of the patch. Whoever work on it had no idea what they were doing.
Why would the fonts be installed in a different location and why would a corrupt font file bring the whole OS down?

/stupid
 
2014-08-18 07:11:26 PM  

Empty H: Does anyone have the original?


oi58.tinypic.com
 
2014-08-18 07:12:03 PM  
Meh, after using Windows 2012 as an admin box for about a month now, all I really miss is the proper start menu.

It's just rows and columns of icons. Yeesh.

/I do hate how flat everything is, though.
 
2014-08-18 07:12:20 PM  

thecactusman17: Listen, I realize this isn't the popular opinion here. But Windows 8 and especially 8.1 runs just fine when you stop using the metro interface, or replace it. The "public face" isn't great, but the OS as a whole is actually really nice. I would pretty much insist it be my windows OS if I were to build a new gaming pc before their next release.

/puts on the nomex suit


I'm using Win8 and I don't have any problems with it. Well, other than the fact that trying to update to 8.1 just takes me to a blank green "Store" screen and nothing happens. Other than that the only issue is some occasional random mouse de-selecting, but that could just be my mouse is on its last legs.
 
2014-08-18 07:19:53 PM  
Or as I like to call it, "Monday."
 
2014-08-18 07:23:53 PM  
It's still a more viable cpnsumer product than Linux.

/tee hee
 
2014-08-18 07:25:49 PM  

thecactusman17: Listen, I realize this isn't the popular opinion here. But Windows 8 and especially 8.1 runs just fine when you stop using the metro interface, or replace it. The "public face" isn't great, but the OS as a whole is actually really nice. I would pretty much insist it be my windows OS if I were to build a new gaming pc before their next release.


/puts on the nomex suit


Actually, I agree. I start up in desktop mode, and I like it fine. My key programs are attached to the menu that pops up when I click the Start icon (The four-box thingy.) It's fast. It runs smoothly. I cannot complain. Also, when I updated Flash and forgot to uncheck the ride-along software, it was very easy to clean up. I am not getting the Windows 8 hate.
 
2014-08-18 07:25:55 PM  

Nexzus: Meh, after using Windows 2012 as an admin box for about a month now, all I really miss is the proper start menu.

It's just rows and columns of icons. Yeesh.

/I do hate how flat everything is, though.


I use Classic Start 8. It converts the windows button into a start menu hotkey.
 
2014-08-18 07:32:04 PM  

thecactusman17: Listen, I realize this isn't the popular opinion here. But Windows 8 and especially 8.1 runs just fine when you stop using the metro interface, or replace it. The "public face" isn't great, but the OS as a whole is actually really nice. I would pretty much insist it be my windows OS if I were to build a new gaming pc before their next release.


/puts on the nomex suit


I agree. I upgraded to W8 when MS were offering it for $40 and once I installed Classic Shell I loved it. Ran vastly faster than XP on the same hardware, even installed easily on a Atom powered netbook with 1GB of RAM I used as a machine to take on holiday.

Didn't like Metro at all on my PC but having just bought a Surface RT Metro makes sense there and once you get used to the swiping it works great. Even the RT can do far more than an iPad, things like multitasking, extending the desktop onto an external monitor or a HDTV, running Word, Excel, Powerpoint etc.

If W9 moves even further away from metro then I wonder what they'll do to the OS on Surface tablets. Being able to run Chrome or Firefox would be the only major things on my wishlist, but I'm not holding my breath.

/Meanwhile, this update hasn't borked my W8 PC, touch wood.
 
2014-08-18 07:35:19 PM  

thecactusman17: Listen, I realize this isn't the popular opinion here. But Windows 8 and especially 8.1 runs just fine when you stop using the metro interface, or replace it. The "public face" isn't great, but the OS as a whole is actually really nice. I would pretty much insist it be my windows OS if I were to build a new gaming pc before their next release.


/puts on the nomex suit


In other words, Windows 8 is fine as long as you don't interact directly with it? That is a super-compelling arguement.
 
2014-08-18 07:35:39 PM  
Nothing broken here or on the 10 others my family owns(they would be screaming since this came out LAST week)
 
2014-08-18 07:39:16 PM  
Meh, still quite content with win7, we'll see what win9 looks like.
 
2014-08-18 07:39:22 PM  

Flint Ironstag: running Word, Excel, Powerpoint etc.


iPads not only have all those, iOS got the latest updates before WP8.
 
2014-08-18 07:41:22 PM  
i am running w8 and
 
2014-08-18 07:55:08 PM  

charro: Why would the fonts be installed in a different location


Designers with boatloads of fonts use font managers to so that they don't have to scroll through an endless list. For example, you could have font sets for particular clients, that are active only while you work on that client's projects. The font managers can move the font files.

Anyway, if your code can't deal with files in non-default locations, your code sucks. That applies to all files, not just fonts.
 
2014-08-18 07:55:17 PM  

Tobin_Lam: Flint Ironstag: running Word, Excel, Powerpoint etc.

iPads not only have all those, iOS got the latest updates before WP8.



Except they are view only. To create or edit you need to pay for Office 365.

While the app itself is free to use (as a spreadsheet viewer), to actually edit workbooks, you need an Office 365 subscription, which will set you back $100 per year.

Plus with things like Onenote the Surface gives you a 'desktop' version for use with the keyboard and trackpad or mouse and a touch version designed for use with touch and swipe gestures. Same with IE, and with email where the desktop has Outlook while metro has Mail, again keyboard and mouse vs touch.
 
2014-08-18 07:58:14 PM  

DeaH: I start up in desktop mode...I am not getting the Windows 8 hate.


The hate is from being thrown into Metro mode, without any obvious way to make it go away.

I can't even remember how I got my system to stick in desktop mode. I know I didn't use any third-party software.
 
2014-08-18 08:02:11 PM  

Tobin_Lam: thecactusman17: Listen, I realize this isn't the popular opinion here. But Windows 8 and especially 8.1 runs just fine when you stop using the metro interface, or replace it. The "public face" isn't great, but the OS as a whole is actually really nice. I would pretty much insist it be my windows OS if I were to build a new gaming pc before their next release.


/puts on the nomex suit

In other words, Windows 8 is fine as long as you don't interact directly with it? That is a super-compelling arguement.


W8 has two separate interfaces, desktop and metro. Metro is designed for touch so yes, you can avoid it if you have a desktop PC with keyboard and mouse. Think of it being like a big sports boat that has two driving positions, one inside and one up top in the open air. If it's nice and sunny sit out in the open. If it's raining sit inside in the warm and dry.
What Microsoft did was sell a boat with all the controls outside, but once you got started and under way you could then go inside and work the steering and throttle from inside. What Classic Shell, and to a certain extent the 8.1 update, does is put all the controls at both positions.
So if you live somewhere cold then yes, you can totally ignore the outside bridge. But the boat is still extremely fast.
 
2014-08-18 08:06:45 PM  

Flint Ironstag: Tobin_Lam: Flint Ironstag: running Word, Excel, Powerpoint etc.

iPads not only have all those, iOS got the latest updates before WP8.


Except they are view only. To create or edit you need to pay for Office 365.

While the app itself is free to use (as a spreadsheet viewer), to actually edit workbooks, you need an Office 365 subscription, which will set you back $100 per year.

Plus with things like Onenote the Surface gives you a 'desktop' version for use with the keyboard and trackpad or mouse and a touch version designed for use with touch and swipe gestures. Same with IE, and with email where the desktop has Outlook while metro has Mail, again keyboard and mouse vs touch.


So? In most cases, one has to pay for Office to even install it. I've used OneNote on my iPad since the iPad 3 with a keyboard.
 
2014-08-18 08:11:05 PM  

Flint Ironstag: Tobin_Lam: thecactusman17: Listen, I realize this isn't the popular opinion here. But Windows 8 and especially 8.1 runs just fine when you stop using the metro interface, or replace it. The "public face" isn't great, but the OS as a whole is actually really nice. I would pretty much insist it be my windows OS if I were to build a new gaming pc before their next release.


/puts on the nomex suit

In other words, Windows 8 is fine as long as you don't interact directly with it? That is a super-compelling arguement.

W8 has two separate interfaces, desktop and metro. Metro is designed for touch so yes, you can avoid it if you have a desktop PC with keyboard and mouse. Think of it being like a big sports boat that has two driving positions, one inside and one up top in the open air. If it's nice and sunny sit out in the open. If it's raining sit inside in the warm and dry.
What Microsoft did was sell a boat with all the controls outside, but once you got started and under way you could then go inside and work the steering and throttle from inside. What Classic Shell, and to a certain extent the 8.1 update, does is put all the controls at both positions.
So if you live somewhere cold then yes, you can totally ignore the outside bridge. But the boat is still extremely fast.


So Windows 8 is fine after you fundamentally change the way you interact with it?
 
2014-08-18 08:18:32 PM  

Tobin_Lam: So Windows 8 is fine after you fundamentally change the way you interact with it?


Windows 8 with a mouse and keyboard is fine if you stay out of the Metro interface. It's not much different from Windows 7 (yes, that means there's not much reason to upgrade).

The Metro 8 interface is good for tablets.
 
2014-08-18 08:19:47 PM  
I've been using W8.1 on my laptop for about 9 months. I've had pretty good luck with it once it boots. The only real issue I've consistently had is getting it out of sleep mode. It wants to lock up when I type in my password. Others have had bigger issues though. I've never tried it with a touch screen though.
 
2014-08-18 08:22:41 PM  

Nexzus: Meh, after using Windows 2012 as an admin box for about a month now, all I really miss is the proper start menu.

It's just rows and columns of icons. Yeesh.

/I do hate how flat everything is, though.


Windows Key + X. 95% of the crap you're going to want to do on a server is either going to be on that menu or it's going to be console you already pinned on the taskbar.
Honestly on Server 2012, the preferred installation is the headless mode with Powershell anyway. Right now there's a bunch of Windows Server-y things that don't have any interface BUT Powershell, which is an exceptionally weird state of affairs for Windows, but I guess Microsoft really, really wants admins to learn it ASAP.
 
2014-08-18 08:23:04 PM  

jaytkay: Tobin_Lam: So Windows 8 is fine after you fundamentally change the way you interact with it?

Windows 8 with a mouse and keyboard is fine if you stay out of the Metro interface. It's not much different from Windows 7 (yes, that means there's not much reason to upgrade).

The Metro 8 interface is good for tablets.


Is there an easy, reliable way to stay out of the Metro interface? Everybody keeps bashing Metro yet nobody ever points out how to make it go away.
 
2014-08-18 08:25:05 PM  

SacriliciousBeerSwiller: It's still a more viable cpnsumer product than Linux.

/tee hee


And Microsoft's spell check is clearly superior.
 
2014-08-18 08:26:53 PM  
Hooray for turning off automatic updates!
 
2014-08-18 08:30:26 PM  

Tobin_Lam: Flint Ironstag: Tobin_Lam: Flint Ironstag: running Word, Excel, Powerpoint etc.

iPads not only have all those, iOS got the latest updates before WP8.


Except they are view only. To create or edit you need to pay for Office 365.

While the app itself is free to use (as a spreadsheet viewer), to actually edit workbooks, you need an Office 365 subscription, which will set you back $100 per year.

Plus with things like Onenote the Surface gives you a 'desktop' version for use with the keyboard and trackpad or mouse and a touch version designed for use with touch and swipe gestures. Same with IE, and with email where the desktop has Outlook while metro has Mail, again keyboard and mouse vs touch.

So? In most cases, one has to pay for Office to even install it. I've used OneNote on my iPad since the iPad 3 with a keyboard.


But not the Surface RT. Word, Excel, Powerpoint, Onenote and Outlook are installed as standard, full versions, nothing more to pay.
 
2014-08-18 08:31:47 PM  

Tobin_Lam: jaytkay: Tobin_Lam: So Windows 8 is fine after you fundamentally change the way you interact with it?

Windows 8 with a mouse and keyboard is fine if you stay out of the Metro interface. It's not much different from Windows 7 (yes, that means there's not much reason to upgrade).

The Metro 8 interface is good for tablets.

Is there an easy, reliable way to stay out of the Metro interface? Everybody keeps bashing Metro yet nobody ever points out how to make it go away.


In the lower left corner of the Metro interface is a Desktop tile, click or touch that to make it go away.
 
2014-08-18 08:31:53 PM  
How to boot to desktop mode in Windows 8.1

1. After booting Windows 8.1, click the Desktop tile to enter Desktop mode.
2. Right-click any open area in the taskbar, then click Properties.
3. Click the Navigation tab, then check the box next to Go to the desktop instead of Start when I sign in.
4. Click OK, then reboot. Windows should plunk you right into Desktop.
 
2014-08-18 08:32:17 PM  

Flint Ironstag: Tobin_Lam: Flint Ironstag: Tobin_Lam: Flint Ironstag: running Word, Excel, Powerpoint etc.

iPads not only have all those, iOS got the latest updates before WP8.


Except they are view only. To create or edit you need to pay for Office 365.

While the app itself is free to use (as a spreadsheet viewer), to actually edit workbooks, you need an Office 365 subscription, which will set you back $100 per year.

Plus with things like Onenote the Surface gives you a 'desktop' version for use with the keyboard and trackpad or mouse and a touch version designed for use with touch and swipe gestures. Same with IE, and with email where the desktop has Outlook while metro has Mail, again keyboard and mouse vs touch.

So? In most cases, one has to pay for Office to even install it. I've used OneNote on my iPad since the iPad 3 with a keyboard.

But not the Surface RT. Word, Excel, Powerpoint, Onenote and Outlook are installed as standard, full versions, nothing more to pay.


But you have to get a Surface RT. That's a pretty steep price.
 
2014-08-18 08:34:02 PM  

Tobin_Lam: Flint Ironstag: Tobin_Lam: thecactusman17: Listen, I realize this isn't the popular opinion here. But Windows 8 and especially 8.1 runs just fine when you stop using the metro interface, or replace it. The "public face" isn't great, but the OS as a whole is actually really nice. I would pretty much insist it be my windows OS if I were to build a new gaming pc before their next release.


/puts on the nomex suit

In other words, Windows 8 is fine as long as you don't interact directly with it? That is a super-compelling arguement.

W8 has two separate interfaces, desktop and metro. Metro is designed for touch so yes, you can avoid it if you have a desktop PC with keyboard and mouse. Think of it being like a big sports boat that has two driving positions, one inside and one up top in the open air. If it's nice and sunny sit out in the open. If it's raining sit inside in the warm and dry.
What Microsoft did was sell a boat with all the controls outside, but once you got started and under way you could then go inside and work the steering and throttle from inside. What Classic Shell, and to a certain extent the 8.1 update, does is put all the controls at both positions.
So if you live somewhere cold then yes, you can totally ignore the outside bridge. But the boat is still extremely fast.

So Windows 8 is fine after you fundamentally change the way you interact with it?


Yes, better than 'fine'. MS totally screwed up by trying to force metro onto desktop, non touchscreen, users. On a tablet metro is great. On a desktop PC it is dire.
But the actual OS runs great, far far faster than XP on the same software and with such a small footprint that I even installed it on a XP Compaq netbook with a Atom processor and 1GB of RAM, and even then it runs better than XP did.

It's a great OS. But metro should have been an option. The traditional XP/Vista/7 desktop should have been the default install if you have a desktop PC.
 
2014-08-18 08:35:36 PM  

Tobin_Lam: jaytkay: Tobin_Lam: So Windows 8 is fine after you fundamentally change the way you interact with it?

Windows 8 with a mouse and keyboard is fine if you stay out of the Metro interface. It's not much different from Windows 7 (yes, that means there's not much reason to upgrade).

The Metro 8 interface is good for tablets.

Is there an easy, reliable way to stay out of the Metro interface? Everybody keeps bashing Metro yet nobody ever points out how to make it go away.


Classic Shell. Or Start8 does a bit more, but Classic Shell is free.

Now I have a Surface I love metro, on the tablet. I still avoid it on my PC.
 
2014-08-18 08:37:22 PM  

Vash's Apprentice: Tobin_Lam: jaytkay: Tobin_Lam: So Windows 8 is fine after you fundamentally change the way you interact with it?

Windows 8 with a mouse and keyboard is fine if you stay out of the Metro interface. It's not much different from Windows 7 (yes, that means there's not much reason to upgrade).

The Metro 8 interface is good for tablets.

Is there an easy, reliable way to stay out of the Metro interface? Everybody keeps bashing Metro yet nobody ever points out how to make it go away.

In the lower left corner of the Metro interface is a Desktop tile, click or touch that to make it go away.


That doesn't keep Metro away.
 
2014-08-18 08:38:37 PM  

jaytkay: How to boot to desktop mode in Windows 8.1

1. After booting Windows 8.1, click the Desktop tile to enter Desktop mode.
2. Right-click any open area in the taskbar, then click Properties.
3. Click the Navigation tab, then check the box next to Go to the desktop instead of Start when I sign in.
4. Click OK, then reboot. Windows should plunk you right into Desktop.


That's pretty handy. Is there any way to make sure I never see Metro, though? I don't want to even accidentally see it.
 
2014-08-18 08:40:26 PM  

Flint Ironstag: Tobin_Lam: jaytkay: Tobin_Lam: So Windows 8 is fine after you fundamentally change the way you interact with it?

Windows 8 with a mouse and keyboard is fine if you stay out of the Metro interface. It's not much different from Windows 7 (yes, that means there's not much reason to upgrade).

The Metro 8 interface is good for tablets.

Is there an easy, reliable way to stay out of the Metro interface? Everybody keeps bashing Metro yet nobody ever points out how to make it go away.

Classic Shell. Or Start8 does a bit more, but Classic Shell is free.

Now I have a Surface I love metro, on the tablet. I still avoid it on my PC.


So, yes, Windows 8 is fine after you fundamentally alter it to make Metro go away?
 
2014-08-18 08:46:34 PM  

Tobin_Lam: Flint Ironstag: Tobin_Lam: Flint Ironstag: Tobin_Lam: Flint Ironstag: running Word, Excel, Powerpoint etc.

iPads not only have all those, iOS got the latest updates before WP8.


Except they are view only. To create or edit you need to pay for Office 365.

While the app itself is free to use (as a spreadsheet viewer), to actually edit workbooks, you need an Office 365 subscription, which will set you back $100 per year.

Plus with things like Onenote the Surface gives you a 'desktop' version for use with the keyboard and trackpad or mouse and a touch version designed for use with touch and swipe gestures. Same with IE, and with email where the desktop has Outlook while metro has Mail, again keyboard and mouse vs touch.

So? In most cases, one has to pay for Office to even install it. I've used OneNote on my iPad since the iPad 3 with a keyboard.

But not the Surface RT. Word, Excel, Powerpoint, Onenote and Outlook are installed as standard, full versions, nothing more to pay.

But you have to get a Surface RT. That's a pretty steep price.


Significantly cheaper than an iPad. But you have the touch cover or type cover keyboards, which are great. USB socket which you can plug in a USB stick, mouse and keyboard, external hard drive, or even a XBox controller to play games. Expandable memory with micro SD, and 64GB of micro SD is a lot cheaper than paying Apple for another 64GB of storage. The kickstand is great. You can multitask, which the iPad can't, so you can surf the net while watching a movie. Or if you are a student you can use the camera to video a lecture while taking notes in Word or Onenote. You can have separate user accounts for family members, which again the iPad can't do. You can plug in a HDTV and extend the desktop to it in full 1080, and play a movie on the big screen while using the Surface screen to surf the net or send an email.

Check out a couple of videos. This one. Or this one. Or how to use an X Box controller.

It's a great machine. My only real wish would be for Chrome or Firefox since IE doesn't have Adblock. You can install block lists in the Do Not Track feature that do the same sort of thing, but it's not quite the same.
 
2014-08-18 08:46:53 PM  

thecactusman17: Listen, I realize this isn't the popular opinion here. But Windows 8 and especially 8.1 runs just fine when you stop using the metro interface, or replace it. The "public face" isn't great, but the OS as a whole is actually really nice. I would pretty much insist it be my windows OS if I were to build a new gaming pc before their next release.


/puts on the nomex suit


Classic Shell and no Metro: win.
 
2014-08-18 08:47:55 PM  

Tobin_Lam: That's pretty handy. Is there any way to make sure I never see Metro, though? I don't want to even accidentally see it.


The only time I see metro is when I click on the corner FKA Start Menu to find a program. Which is very rare because I put all my frequently used programs on the task bar.

One of the third party things mentioned above might do more, but I haven't tried them.
 
2014-08-18 08:49:59 PM  

Tobin_Lam: So, yes, Windows 8 is fine after you fundamentally alter it to make Metro go away?


It's just changing the default shell on boot up.
 
2014-08-18 08:52:43 PM  

Flint Ironstag: Tobin_Lam: Flint Ironstag: Tobin_Lam: Flint Ironstag: Tobin_Lam: Flint Ironstag: running Word, Excel, Powerpoint etc.

iPads not only have all those, iOS got the latest updates before WP8.


Except they are view only. To create or edit you need to pay for Office 365.

While the app itself is free to use (as a spreadsheet viewer), to actually edit workbooks, you need an Office 365 subscription, which will set you back $100 per year.

Plus with things like Onenote the Surface gives you a 'desktop' version for use with the keyboard and trackpad or mouse and a touch version designed for use with touch and swipe gestures. Same with IE, and with email where the desktop has Outlook while metro has Mail, again keyboard and mouse vs touch.

So? In most cases, one has to pay for Office to even install it. I've used OneNote on my iPad since the iPad 3 with a keyboard.

But not the Surface RT. Word, Excel, Powerpoint, Onenote and Outlook are installed as standard, full versions, nothing more to pay.

But you have to get a Surface RT. That's a pretty steep price.

Significantly cheaper than an iPad. But you have the touch cover or type cover keyboards, which are great. USB socket which you can plug in a USB stick, mouse and keyboard, external hard drive, or even a XBox controller to play games. Expandable memory with micro SD, and 64GB of micro SD is a lot cheaper than paying Apple for another 64GB of storage. The kickstand is great. You can multitask, which the iPad can't, so you can surf the net while watching a movie. Or if you are a student you can use the camera to video a lecture while taking notes in Word or Onenote. You can have separate user accounts for family members, which again the iPad can't do. You can plug in a HDTV and extend the desktop to it in full 1080, and play a movie on the big screen while using the Surface screen to surf the net or send an email.

Check out a couple of videos. This one. Or this one. Or how to use an X Box controller.

It's a great m ...


But you're still running "imitation" Windows and stuck with the Windows store. That's why it is so much cheaper than an iPad.
 
2014-08-18 08:53:32 PM  

Tobin_Lam: Flint Ironstag: Tobin_Lam: jaytkay: Tobin_Lam: So Windows 8 is fine after you fundamentally change the way you interact with it?

Windows 8 with a mouse and keyboard is fine if you stay out of the Metro interface. It's not much different from Windows 7 (yes, that means there's not much reason to upgrade).

The Metro 8 interface is good for tablets.

Is there an easy, reliable way to stay out of the Metro interface? Everybody keeps bashing Metro yet nobody ever points out how to make it go away.

Classic Shell. Or Start8 does a bit more, but Classic Shell is free.

Now I have a Surface I love metro, on the tablet. I still avoid it on my PC.

So, yes, Windows 8 is fine after you fundamentally alter it to make Metro go away?


It's fine with Metro. I don't get the whole metro hate from PC users. It's not the greatest design, and it certainly could have been done better, but it's perfectly functional. 8.1 streamlines it further, especially the way it allows you to type and find whatever Windows has indexed (8 tried to categorize everything, 8.1 doesn't bother, thankfully)
 
2014-08-18 08:53:53 PM  

jaytkay: Tobin_Lam: That's pretty handy. Is there any way to make sure I never see Metro, though? I don't want to even accidentally see it.

The only time I see metro is when I click on the corner FKA Start Menu to find a program. Which is very rare because I put all my frequently used programs on the task bar.

One of the third party things mentioned above might do more, but I haven't tried them.


Good to know. Nobody ever seems to answer that question well.
 
2014-08-18 08:55:20 PM  

Tobin_Lam: Flint Ironstag: Tobin_Lam: jaytkay: Tobin_Lam: So Windows 8 is fine after you fundamentally change the way you interact with it?

Windows 8 with a mouse and keyboard is fine if you stay out of the Metro interface. It's not much different from Windows 7 (yes, that means there's not much reason to upgrade).

The Metro 8 interface is good for tablets.

Is there an easy, reliable way to stay out of the Metro interface? Everybody keeps bashing Metro yet nobody ever points out how to make it go away.

Classic Shell. Or Start8 does a bit more, but Classic Shell is free.

Now I have a Surface I love metro, on the tablet. I still avoid it on my PC.

So, yes, Windows 8 is fine after you fundamentally alter it to make Metro go away?


As I said in the post before the one you quoted above:

Yes, better than 'fine'. MS totally screwed up by trying to force metro onto desktop, non touchscreen, users. On a tablet metro is great. On a desktop PC it is dire.
But the actual OS runs great, far far faster than XP on the same software and with such a small footprint that I even installed it on a XP Compaq netbook with a Atom processor and 1GB of RAM, and even then it runs better than XP did.

It's a great OS. But metro should have been an option. The traditional XP/Vista/7 desktop should have been the default install if you have a desktop PC.


To use another analogy, what if a car company released a fantastic car, fantastic performance, comfortable, economical, good value, great looking but, the factory fitted tyres were terrible. For a (relatively) minor sum you can but tyres that make it awesome.

Would you refuse to buy it and change the tyres and instead stick with a car that is slower, worse handling, less economical, less comfortable and not as good looking? For the sake of something that you can easily fix? Isn't that cutting your nose off to spite your face? How are you benefiting? Or course it would be better if the manufacturer fitted those better tyres as standard, but until they do it is something you can fix easily. Why would you stick with your old, slow, thirsty car?
 
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