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(KATU)   It might take them 33 years, and a few clerical errors, but the Oregon DMV always gets their man   (katu.com) divider line 31
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8311 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Aug 2014 at 8:29 AM (37 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



31 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-08-17 07:10:49 AM  
Did he die of Dysentery?
 
2014-08-17 08:16:25 AM  
So there is hope that Cover Oregon will be running before the robot rebellion.

theawesomer.com
 
2014-08-17 08:36:57 AM  
Ah extortion.... 33 years ago we made a typo and the statute of limitations is up, but we totally warned you by maybe sending a letter to an invalid address, but just pay us $75 and it'll be cool, K?
 
2014-08-17 08:51:08 AM  
if it was a parking ticket stuck on his car that possibly was blown off or removed by a wise a$$ he'd have a excuse. worse happened to me. i got my commercial drivers license and when i signed up with a national trucking company they said i couldn't drive with them because i hadn't had a driver's license for years and had to have one for 2 years until i could drive with them. parking tickets from 8 hours away years ago i  never saw on my car was the problem. i'm just glad i didn't get into a accident and hurt someone and their fancy lawyer claimed i didn't have a license. i got stuck driving for a p o s company because my failing to pay the tickets and the dmv saying i didn't have a license for years made me look like a scumbag.
 
2014-08-17 09:04:28 AM  
The slow wheuels of bureaucracy grinding innocents to dust.
 
2014-08-17 09:17:00 AM  

HighlanderRPI: Ah extortion.... 33 years ago we made a typo and the statute of limitations is up, but we totally warned you by maybe sending a letter to an invalid address, but just pay us $75 and it'll be cool, K?


Exactly, the DMV could have just owned up and said that due to the error on their part combined with 20+ years passing that it wasn't a big deal and they'd just fix it, and it would have been a good PR move.

But nope, they went the douchebag route.
 
2014-08-17 09:17:40 AM  
House said the DMV did send a warning letter to Berry at his registered address in July.

Well that changes everything. The USPS and DMV are competing for the proficiency Olympics medal.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-08-17 09:26:58 AM  
The DMV said the statute of limitations is no longer valid, so Berry does not have to pay for the ticket or suspension, but he does have to pay $75 to get his license reinstated.

There are a few times you want me on your jury. When you go Rambo on the tow company that is holding your car hostage, not guilty. When you blow up DMV policy makers, not guilty.

(There are also times you don't want me on your jury. I think capital punishment is seriously underused in this country.)
 
2014-08-17 09:36:50 AM  
And somewhere Kevin Berdy is laughing his tail off.
 
2014-08-17 10:03:29 AM  

strangeluck: and it would have been a good PR move.


if the OR DMV is like any other state i've lived in and good PR really isn't what they are going for.

and imo this dipshiat should just pay up. i suspect the "it got lost in the mail" is BS. and even if it isn't the local action news folks aren't going to do anything else for him so right now he has a suspended license. good luck if he gets stopped again.
 
2014-08-17 10:13:51 AM  
4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-08-17 10:27:18 AM  
"That's a nice driver's license there. Shame if anything should happen to it."

/DMV and Meter Maids. Crooks with delusions of grandeur, the lot of 'em.
 
2014-08-17 11:34:24 AM  
Ya know, it sucks, but in the interest of moving things along, just pay the freaking $75.00 already.
 
2014-08-17 12:07:35 PM  

HighlanderRPI: Ah extortion.... 33 years ago we made a typo and the statute of limitations is up, but we totally warned you by maybe sending a letter to an invalid address, but just pay us $75 and it'll be cool, K?


As far as I know SOL in such cases usually doesn't work that way. The clock starta ticking from the time you discover the problem.

Since the actual merge and invalidation ot his license occurred recently, the SOL is probably not up.
 
2014-08-17 12:26:09 PM  
i.imgflip.com
 
2014-08-17 12:37:13 PM  
Let me get this straight, another guy got a ticket in 1981 and they want him to pay it?
 
2014-08-17 01:13:37 PM  
When I moved from Texas to Alabama in 2008 and applied for an Alabama license, the DMV said that my license had been suspended by Oregon due to an unpaid speeding ticket I received there in 1986.

The last time I was in Oregon was 1985, but I couldn't prove that, so my best option (a.) was to pay the $350 ticket and fines - vs (b.) fly from Alabama to Oregon to defend myself against the ticket or (c.)  pay an attorney in Oregon to fight this.  Both (b.) and (c.) would have cost well over $350.

Talking with folks I knew in Oregon, I learned that an ex-girlfriend was riding with some guy in 1986 and they were pulled over for speeding.   He claimed he didn't have his license with him and gave the officer just enough of my personal information (that she had quickly told him) so that I received the ticket.  Although the ex-girlfriend would not take my call and discuss this, her parents got the true story and told me over the phone.  They also said the guy she was with at the time had a record of previous arrests.

Even though my date of birth and permanent address were incorrect, Florida gave them a "matching record" and drivers license number.  When I told the DA in Oregon what happened, he said that if even if my ex-girlfriend wanted to come in and tell them the truth (which she declined) he couldn't guarantee they could drop the charges.   The DA said that if I could prove I was at work in Los Angeles where I had moved on the day the ticket was issued, they could drop it.   There was no way to prove that 20 years after the fact, as the hospital where I was working in 1986 changed ownership and there were no payroll records available.

Even though I took the approach of just paying every one off, it took about three months and around $350 worth of fines and penalties to Oregon.

I learned later that Florida, Oregon and Alabama had all joined into some agreement with several other states to allow old tickets to be used to suspend drivers licenses - forcing payment of the old tickets.  I also learned that my license had been suspended by Oregon in 2006 - twenty years after the ticket and when I was carrying a Texas license.  But - Alabama would not issue a license until this was cleared up.   The original fine for the ticket - if paid on time - would have been $68.00.

One more reason to see government agencies as inept, uncaring, and strong-arming citizens with their authority.
 
2014-08-17 01:22:16 PM  
"It's the principle," he added.

Failing to pay a ticket 30 years ago and hoping the DMV had just forgotten about it IS the mark of a principled man.
 
2014-08-17 02:04:45 PM  

indylaw: "It's the principle," he added.

Failing to pay another person's ticket 30 years ago and hoping the DMV had just forgotten about it IS the mark of a principled man.


FTFthereadingcomprehensionimpaired
 
2014-08-17 02:24:20 PM  
Per Wikipedia: "The first speed camera systems in the USA was in Friendswood, Texas in 1986 and La Marque, Texas in 1987."

Can we give Kevin Berry the benefit of a doubt and say that he'd likely not forget being pulled over and issued a hand-written ticket even if he didn't receive any notice about not paying said ticket 33 years ago? Nope, we can only give the feckless bureaucracy the benefit of a doubt and assume that the ticket issued to Kevin Berdy was actually meant for Berry (without requiring the DMV to provide proof of his offense). Because f*ck you, Kevin Berry.
 
2014-08-17 02:38:36 PM  

MerelyFoolish: When I moved from Texas to Alabama in 2008 and applied for an Alabama license, the DMV said that my license had been suspended by Oregon due to an unpaid speeding ticket I received there in 1986.

The last time I was in Oregon was 1985, but I couldn't prove that, so my best option (a.) was to pay the $350 ticket and fines - vs (b.) fly from Alabama to Oregon to defend myself against the ticket or (c.)  pay an attorney in Oregon to fight this.  Both (b.) and (c.) would have cost well over $350.

Talking with folks I knew in Oregon, I learned that an ex-girlfriend was riding with some guy in 1986 and they were pulled over for speeding.   He claimed he didn't have his license with him and gave the officer just enough of my personal information (that she had quickly told him) so that I received the ticket.  Although the ex-girlfriend would not take my call and discuss this, her parents got the true story and told me over the phone.  They also said the guy she was with at the time had a record of previous arrests.

Even though my date of birth and permanent address were incorrect, Florida gave them a "matching record" and drivers license number.  When I told the DA in Oregon what happened, he said that if even if my ex-girlfriend wanted to come in and tell them the truth (which she declined) he couldn't guarantee they could drop the charges.   The DA said that if I could prove I was at work in Los Angeles where I had moved on the day the ticket was issued, they could drop it.   There was no way to prove that 20 years after the fact, as the hospital where I was working in 1986 changed ownership and there were no payroll records available.

Even though I took the approach of just paying every one off, it took about three months and around $350 worth of fines and penalties to Oregon.

I learned later that Florida, Oregon and Alabama had all joined into some agreement with several other states to allow old tickets to be used to suspend drivers licenses - forcing payment of t ...


It sounds like you basically got caught in the same dragnet this guy did. Oregon obviously decided that they wanted the money and were willing to merge even the most questionable records to get it -- because fark you, that's why. Most companies have to throw out bad or questionable records, by law or by industry standards, and can be sued if they don't, but just try to sue the DMV and see how far you get.
 
2014-08-17 02:48:25 PM  
there was an error back in 1981 and a record was created under the name "Berdy," not "Berry." The "Berdy" record showed the 1981 ticket and a suspension.

1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-08-17 02:54:03 PM  

scalpod: indylaw: "It's the principle," he added.

Failing to pay another person's ticket 30 years ago and hoping the DMV had just forgotten about it IS the mark of a principled man.

FTFthereadingcomprehensionimpaired


No. The officer who pulled him over misspelled his name on the ticket and so the unpaid citation didn't get noted in his DMV file until they caught the error recently. He's not disputing that the ticket is his. He's disputing ever receiving notice of late payment.

I think the fact that you accused me of not reading is cute.
 
2014-08-17 03:16:45 PM  

indylaw: scalpod: indylaw: "It's the principle," he added.

Failing to pay another person's ticket 30 years ago and hoping the DMV had just forgotten about it IS the mark of a principled man.

FTFthereadingcomprehensionimpaired

No. The officer who pulled him over misspelled his name on the ticket and so the unpaid citation didn't get noted in his DMV file until they caught the error recently. He's not disputing that the ticket is his. He's disputing ever receiving notice of late payment.

I think the fact that you accused me of not reading is cute.


Please point out where in the article (or accompanying video) it's stated that the officer issuing the ticket misspelled his name. They say that the record was *filed* under the incorrect name. He says in the interview that he didn't get any such ticket back then and that if he had, he would've paid it. I say it's incumbent on the DMV to prove that the ticket was in fact issued to Kevin Berry and not Kevin Berty, Kevin Bergy, Kevin Bermy or Kevin Berpy. If it was simply misfiled, then the name on the ticket should in fact be Kevin Berry and he would clearly have been on the hook. The fact that you don't realize any of this and are supporting the DMV is simply adorable.
 
2014-08-17 03:24:47 PM  

scalpod: indylaw: scalpod: indylaw: "It's the principle," he added.

Failing to pay another person's ticket 30 years ago and hoping the DMV had just forgotten about it IS the mark of a principled man.

FTFthereadingcomprehensionimpaired

No. The officer who pulled him over misspelled his name on the ticket and so the unpaid citation didn't get noted in his DMV file until they caught the error recently. He's not disputing that the ticket is his. He's disputing ever receiving notice of late payment.

I think the fact that you accused me of not reading is cute.

Please point out where in the article (or accompanying video) it's stated that the officer issuing the ticket misspelled his name. They say that the record was *filed* under the incorrect name. He says in the interview that he didn't get any such ticket back then and that if he had, he would've paid it. I say it's incumbent on the DMV to prove that the ticket was in fact issued to Kevin Berry and not Kevin Berty, Kevin Bergy, Kevin Bermy or Kevin Berpy. If it was simply misfiled, then the name on the ticket should in fact be Kevin Berry and he would clearly have been on the hook. The fact that you don't realize any of this and are supporting the DMV is simply adorable.


FTFA

A DMV spokesperson researched the issue and said there was an error back in 1981 and a record was created under the name "Berdy," not "Berry." The "Berdy" record showed the 1981 ticket and a suspension.

...

In this case, he said, the DMV merged the two records, and because one record had no valid driving privileges [i.e. the DMV opened up a file back in the 80s to correspond with the 'Berdy' name, but their housekeeping showed that 'Berdy' wasn't an actual person (and therefore had no "valid driving privileges")], Berry's current, valid license was declared not valid in July, 33 years after the Berdy suspension.

...

Berry does not think he should have to pay over a typo from 1981.
 
2014-08-17 03:27:12 PM  
Until and unless the DMV produces the details of the original ticket showing Berry's driver license number (with his name misspelled) then I'm going to side with Mr. Berry. After all, it should be an easy enough thing for them to do, given that he's faithfully renewed it for 33 years with the *very same department*.
 
2014-08-17 03:30:00 PM  

indylaw: scalpod: indylaw: scalpod: indylaw: "It's the principle," he added.

Failing to pay another person's ticket 30 years ago and hoping the DMV had just forgotten about it IS the mark of a principled man.

FTFthereadingcomprehensionimpaired

No. The officer who pulled him over misspelled his name on the ticket and so the unpaid citation didn't get noted in his DMV file until they caught the error recently. He's not disputing that the ticket is his. He's disputing ever receiving notice of late payment.

I think the fact that you accused me of not reading is cute.

Please point out where in the article (or accompanying video) it's stated that the officer issuing the ticket misspelled his name. They say that the record was *filed* under the incorrect name. He says in the interview that he didn't get any such ticket back then and that if he had, he would've paid it. I say it's incumbent on the DMV to prove that the ticket was in fact issued to Kevin Berry and not Kevin Berty, Kevin Bergy, Kevin Bermy or Kevin Berpy. If it was simply misfiled, then the name on the ticket should in fact be Kevin Berry and he would clearly have been on the hook. The fact that you don't realize any of this and are supporting the DMV is simply adorable.

FTFA

A DMV spokesperson researched the issue and said there was an error back in 1981 and a record was created under the name "Berdy," not "Berry." The "Berdy" record showed the 1981 ticket and a suspension.

...

In this case, he said, the DMV merged the two records, and because one record had no valid driving privileges [i.e. the DMV opened up a file back in the 80s to correspond with the 'Berdy' name, but their housekeeping showed that 'Berdy' wasn't an actual person (and therefore had no "valid driving privileges")], Berry's current, valid license was declared not valid in July, 33 years after the Berdy suspension.

...

Berry does not think he should have to pay over a typo from 1981.


What you're not getting here is that just because this was a typo does not automatically incriminate Berry. What if the original ticket should've been issued to Bergy, Berty, Bermy, Bervy, Berky or Berpy? All they have to do is produce the ticket clearly showing Berry's driver's license number, which would not have changed in all this intervening time, and then he's clearly guilty. Simple enough.
 
2014-08-17 03:30:49 PM  

scalpod: Until and unless the DMV produces the details of the original ticket showing Berry's driver license number (with his name misspelled) then I'm going to side with Mr. Berry. After all, it should be an easy enough thing for them to do, given that he's faithfully renewed it for 33 years with the *very same department*.


So what you're telling me is that you don't think it's occurred to Mr. Berry to challenge the authenticity of the traffic ticket at issue?

Or are you backpedaling because you realize that you look like a fool?
 
2014-08-17 03:38:17 PM  

indylaw: scalpod: Until and unless the DMV produces the details of the original ticket showing Berry's driver license number (with his name misspelled) then I'm going to side with Mr. Berry. After all, it should be an easy enough thing for them to do, given that he's faithfully renewed it for 33 years with the *very same department*.

So what you're telling me is that you don't think it's occurred to Mr. Berry to challenge the authenticity of the traffic ticket at issue?

Or are you backpedaling because you realize that you look like a fool?


No, I'm saying you look like a fool because nowhere in that cut and paste you posted does it say that the issuing officer misspelled his name, as I said it didn't. In fact, you filled in blanks (again) with your own assumption of guilt on his part and you continue to support an incompetent bureaucracy over this particular guy. If he had challenged it and lost because his driver's license number was clearly associated with the original offense then please explain to me why the DMV wouldn't want this single, salient detail reported to avoid another obvious PR black eye?

But whatever, please double down by all means.
 
2014-08-17 03:52:52 PM  

scalpod: indylaw: scalpod: Until and unless the DMV produces the details of the original ticket showing Berry's driver license number (with his name misspelled) then I'm going to side with Mr. Berry. After all, it should be an easy enough thing for them to do, given that he's faithfully renewed it for 33 years with the *very same department*.

So what you're telling me is that you don't think it's occurred to Mr. Berry to challenge the authenticity of the traffic ticket at issue?

Or are you backpedaling because you realize that you look like a fool?

No, I'm saying you look like a fool because nowhere in that cut and paste you posted does it say that the issuing officer misspelled his name, as I said it didn't. In fact, you filled in blanks (again) with your own assumption of guilt on his part and you continue to support an incompetent bureaucracy over this particular guy. If he had challenged it and lost because his driver's license number was clearly associated with the original offense then please explain to me why the DMV wouldn't want this single, salient detail reported to avoid another obvious PR black eye?

But whatever, please double down by all means.


Well, first, you're the one making assumptions of "guilt" or "innocence" because you're trying your damnedest to fit this into the mold of fair citizen vs. heartless bureaucracy. I'm not the one trying to promote one side or the other. It's clear that the late discovery of the error is due to the incompetence of the DMV. Maybe Mr. Berry truly did forget that he had a ticket and innocently continued to make that mistake because it was never brought up at the DMV when he went to renew his license and registration, and that he never got a notice in the mail because he just happened to change his forwarding address a day too late so that the Postal Service never forwarded his mail. It's at least a plausible set of coincidences. If so, that is truly unfortunate and it sucks that he had to learn of it through a suspension and contact with a law enforcement officer. 

Second, you seem to assume that the DMV is the one writing the story or that the DMV has such power that it can force the news station to tell the story the way they want it told.

If the ticket isn't his -- if it truly is for someone named "Berdy" (which would be strange, at least based on what's been reported, because the filing of the unpaid ticket under the name "Berdy" is characterized as an 'error' -- then why hasn't he gone to the press and said "Holy nards, some schmuck named Berdy hasn't paid a traffic ticket from the 80s and I'm being blamed for it for no good reason!" Why is he quoted as saying that:

"I started to pay it that day," said Berry.

Why pay it if it isn't his ticket?

Now, I recognize that it's possible that the fine investigative news team at KATU-TV may be completely misrepresenting the facts, but we're arguing here about the set of facts that has been reported, which is honestly the only knowledge you or I have about this situation.
 
2014-08-17 08:06:55 PM  

indylaw: scalpod: indylaw: scalpod: Until and unless the DMV produces the details of the original ticket showing Berry's driver license number (with his name misspelled) then I'm going to side with Mr. Berry. After all, it should be an easy enough thing for them to do, given that he's faithfully renewed it for 33 years with the *very same department*.

So what you're telling me is that you don't think it's occurred to Mr. Berry to challenge the authenticity of the traffic ticket at issue?

Or are you backpedaling because you realize that you look like a fool?

No, I'm saying you look like a fool because nowhere in that cut and paste you posted does it say that the issuing officer misspelled his name, as I said it didn't. In fact, you filled in blanks (again) with your own assumption of guilt on his part and you continue to support an incompetent bureaucracy over this particular guy. If he had challenged it and lost because his driver's license number was clearly associated with the original offense then please explain to me why the DMV wouldn't want this single, salient detail reported to avoid another obvious PR black eye?

But whatever, please double down by all means.

Well, first, you're the one making assumptions of "guilt" or "innocence" because you're trying your damnedest to fit this into the mold of fair citizen vs. heartless bureaucracy. I'm not the one trying to promote one side or the other. It's clear that the late discovery of the error is due to the incompetence of the DMV. Maybe Mr. Berry truly did forget that he had a ticket and innocently continued to make that mistake because it was never brought up at the DMV when he went to renew his license and registration, and that he never got a notice in the mail because he just happened to change his forwarding address a day too late so that the Postal Service never forwarded his mail. It's at least a plausible set of coincidences. If so, that is truly unfortunate and it sucks that he had to learn of it through a s ...


FTA: "Berry said he remembers no warning letter from 1981. House said the DMV did send a warning letter to Berry at his registered address in July. Berry said he moved not long ago from that address, but no letter from the DMV was forwarded to him."

He said he moved recently, which is why he didn't receive the new warning sent in July of *this year*. The notice they said they sent back in 1981 to "Berdy" would still have gone to Berry's address *back then* had it actually been him and not another driver whose name also to be just one letter off from the spelling of the record which they opened. Of course "Berdy" had no driving privileges as the name was incorrect, but the address and other information associated with the person should either line up with Berry (or, if he's innocent) a *different* driver, who should be dealing with all this. The "that day" that he was starting to pay was the recent day they told him he had to do so, else he wouldn't be able to drive - not back in 1981, when he supposedly received this ticket and the first warning. He stopped and refused to pay recently as he had no memory of getting the ticket back then and felt like he was being extorted now. I readily admit we're both at the mercy of KATU's half-assed reporting but I just feel like the whole thing would be a non-story if the DMV would simply come out and say that yes - this is Mr. Berry's ticket definitively because the other associated info (address, phone number, etc.) all match up with Mr. Berry's previous personal info at the time the ticket was issued.

It's pretty simple really. If all they got wrong was the one letter in his last name and the rest checks out then he's guilty and simply forgot (or has purposefully dodged it all along as you originally implied, regardless of claiming *I'm* the only one insinuating guilt here).
 
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