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(Ars Technica)   Verizon is letting copper-line telephone networks rot because "the money is in watching cat videos on iPhones"   (arstechnica.com) divider line 134
    More: Obvious, Verizon, Xerox PARC, public switched telephone network, power outages, Public Knowledge, land lines, FiOS  
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3212 clicks; posted to Geek » on 16 Aug 2014 at 11:31 PM (37 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-08-16 08:49:27 PM  
FTA -
"Verizon's efforts to force people off copper in my area of Rhode Island rise to the level of harassment," Verizon customer Karen Anne Kolling of North Kingstown, Rhode Island, told Ars.

Kolling is one of numerous Verizon customers who got in touch with Ars in response to articles on the in-progress shutoff of the traditional telephone network. "They have contacted me at least 10 to 20 times in the last year, including showing up unannounced on my doorstep to tell me they were switching me to FiOS," Kolling said. "So far I have managed to save my landline in this area, which is subject to power failures from hurricanes."


Power failures from hurricanes in Rhode Island? That happens in what, once a decade maybe?

FTA-
"I have two sick people in the house," Keys said. "Going through Hurricane Sandy, I had no power for 12 days, and I was the only one on the block who had phone service.

Ah - so the argument is based of what happened during a once-a-century storm...
Tell you what lady, if you want to keep the copper you need to pay fair share for maintaining it. I am sure that once the price reaches $100+ a month you will rethink your choices.
 
2014-08-16 08:51:50 PM  
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kdgt1ZHkvnM

hey guy's this is the funniest thing you will see anywhere, ever...email it to everyone you know. they will love it.
 
2014-08-16 09:29:41 PM  

Slives: Power failures


Never heard of 'em.

cdn.instructables.com
 
2014-08-16 09:36:15 PM  
I cancelled my landline 7 yrs ago. Based on many years of experience at different locations with adverse weather, copper landline's reliability is indeed the best and may never be matched. But what made me switch was that 80-90% of the calls to my landline were political or commercial solicitations or robocalls permitted by law. And most of my legitimate calls were coming to my mobile phone. So, rather than pay for a source of aggravation, I cancelled my landline and have since used my mobile phone exclusively. Fortunately, I have not yet had any outages from my mobile service. But, I do worry about the future, if/when the telecoms successfully lobby to override the protections against commercial/political phone spam.
 
2014-08-16 09:48:09 PM  

Slives: FTA -
"Verizon's efforts to force people off copper in my area of Rhode Island rise to the level of harassment," Verizon customer Karen Anne Kolling of North Kingstown, Rhode Island, told Ars.

Kolling is one of numerous Verizon customers who got in touch with Ars in response to articles on the in-progress shutoff of the traditional telephone network. "They have contacted me at least 10 to 20 times in the last year, including showing up unannounced on my doorstep to tell me they were switching me to FiOS," Kolling said. "So far I have managed to save my landline in this area, which is subject to power failures from hurricanes."

Power failures from hurricanes in Rhode Island? That happens in what, once a decade maybe?

FTA-
"I have two sick people in the house," Keys said. "Going through Hurricane Sandy, I had no power for 12 days, and I was the only one on the block who had phone service.

Ah - so the argument is based of what happened during a once-a-century storm...
Tell you what lady, if you want to keep the copper you need to pay fair share for maintaining it. I am sure that once the price reaches $100+ a month you will rethink your choices.


RI does get Nor'easters and other serious storms.  Any coastal area is at a higher risk at losing power due to weather events.

Still, fiber is the way of the future, and it's time to get people on board.  If she's concerned about connectivity in emergencies and lives in a storm prone area perhaps she should get a small generator to power essentials in the event of prolonged power outages.
 
2014-08-16 10:00:02 PM  
FIOS systems have backup batteries to allow for phone service in the event power is disrupted. When we had a hurricane blow through here a few years ago power was down for 3 days but Internet/TV/Phone kept working the entire time once I got the generator working.
 
2014-08-16 10:19:25 PM  

doglover: Slives: Power failures

Never heard of 'em.

[cdn.instructables.com image 620x465]


That's all well and good, but sometimes the cell towers lose power.
 
2014-08-16 11:05:21 PM  

doglover: Slives: Power failures

Never heard of 'em.

[cdn.instructables.com image 620x465]


haha hahaha haha haha haha hahaha ha
that's so funny!!!

I bet you think that your phone will still work during a power failure.
 
2014-08-16 11:08:31 PM  

enry: FIOS systems have backup batteries to allow for phone service in the event power is disrupted. When we had a hurricane blow through here a few years ago power was down for 3 days but Internet/TV/Phone kept working the entire time once I got the generator working.


nice
and cell towers have some battery backup ... some of the time ... for some length of time
meh

I live between two power substations, it take two acts of nature to take my power out.
Hell, I cant remember the last time I lost power.
 
2014-08-16 11:12:52 PM  

Nabb1: doglover: Slives: Power failures

Never heard of 'em.

[cdn.instructables.com image 620x465]

That's all well and good, but sometimes the cell towers lose power.


The hell do I need cell towers for. Blackout = vacation from work. "Sorry boss, no interwebs."

Break out the beers, brats, and a hibachi and crank the tunes.
 
2014-08-16 11:14:43 PM  

namatad: I bet you think that your phone will still work during a power failure.


It will, just not as a phone.

Most everything I own still works during a power failure. Remember that big ass blackout on the East Coast in 2005? I don't.

I was campin' through it. Didn't realize anything had happened till I got back.
 
2014-08-16 11:17:39 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: Still, fiber is the way of the future, and it's time to get people on board.  If she's concerned about connectivity in emergencies and lives in a storm prone area perhaps she should get a small generator to power essentials in the event of prolonged power outages.


Spoken like an idiot who has never lived through a hurricane.

Genius, even if you have a generator, if you can't get gas for fuel for it then it won't last days. Most emergency generators can do at most 12 hours on 5 gallons of fuel. I'd keep 25 gallons on hand when I was living rural and that was fine for less than a week. Our longest power outage was 16 farking days. If the gas stations near you also don't have power, then you can't get fuel for the generator.

But here's the kicker: I had a land line and a cell phone with Verizon. Guess what also doesn't work without electricity? Your farking cell tower. Just like you, they have emergency generators that need fuel to run, but if the entire fuel supply infrastructure has broken down (seriously, you can't pump gas if the station doesn't have power) then you can't keep them running. And Verizon does not keep their rural cell towers running for any length of time after an extended power outage. It might be because they can't get diesel or propane to run the generators, or it might be because they don't give a shiat, but it doesn't change the fact that your cell phone doesn't work if it can't find a tower to connect to.

Our landline phones never went out. Power would go out, but the phone lines were buried in the ground near the turn of the century and they just kept kicking along. So unless Verizon is willing to get that level of reliability on their new services, fark 'em. And since they aren't subject to the same regulations that forced companies in 19-Goddamn-20 to build a network that worked during catastrophes, I'm not willing to give them the benefit of the doubt.

Christ, some of you people have no farking clue how infrastructure works.
 
2014-08-16 11:24:16 PM  

Lsherm: TuteTibiImperes: Still, fiber is the way of the future, and it's time to get people on board.  If she's concerned about connectivity in emergencies and lives in a storm prone area perhaps she should get a small generator to power essentials in the event of prolonged power outages.

Spoken like an idiot who has never lived through a hurricane.

Genius, even if you have a generator, if you can't get gas for fuel for it then it won't last days. Most emergency generators can do at most 12 hours on 5 gallons of fuel. I'd keep 25 gallons on hand when I was living rural and that was fine for less than a week. Our longest power outage was 16 farking days. If the gas stations near you also don't have power, then you can't get fuel for the generator.

But here's the kicker: I had a land line and a cell phone with Verizon. Guess what also doesn't work without electricity? Your farking cell tower. Just like you, they have emergency generators that need fuel to run, but if the entire fuel supply infrastructure has broken down (seriously, you can't pump gas if the station doesn't have power) then you can't keep them running. And Verizon does not keep their rural cell towers running for any length of time after an extended power outage. It might be because they can't get diesel or propane to run the generators, or it might be because they don't give a shiat, but it doesn't change the fact that your cell phone doesn't work if it can't find a tower to connect to.

Our landline phones never went out. Power would go out, but the phone lines were buried in the ground near the turn of the century and they just kept kicking along. So unless Verizon is willing to get that level of reliability on their new services, fark 'em. And since they aren't subject to the same regulations that forced companies in 19-Goddamn-20 to build a network that worked during catastrophes, I'm not willing to give them the benefit of the doubt.

Christ, some of you people have no farking clue how infrastructure ...


I've been through hurricanes, though never lost power for more than a day.  You could always ration your gas usage if you need to use the phone, or, once the storm has passed, actually drive somewhere if you need to talk to someone.

You could also get a solar battery charger that would be enough to power a FIOS phone if you don't want to go the generator route.

America's internet infrastructure is woefully inadequate compared to a lot of other places in the world, and a lot of that has to do with the fact that we're still relying on copper wire laid down in the 20s.  I don't see why Verizon necessarily has to eliminate their copper network to lay down fiber, but if doing so allows them to lay down fiber faster and connect more homes, I'm for it.
 
2014-08-16 11:46:52 PM  

doglover: Remember that big ass blackout on the East Coast in 2005? I don't.


So you don't remember that big ass blackout on the East Coast in 2005?  You don't remember that?
 
2014-08-16 11:47:50 PM  

Relatively Obscure: doglover: Remember that big ass blackout on the East Coast in 2005? I don't.

So you don't remember that big ass blackout on the East Coast in 2005?  You don't remember that?


Obviously not, because it was actually in 2003.
 
2014-08-16 11:48:31 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: Slives: FTA -
"Verizon's efforts to force people off copper in my area of Rhode Island rise to the level of harassment," Verizon customer Karen Anne Kolling of North Kingstown, Rhode Island, told Ars.

Kolling is one of numerous Verizon customers who got in touch with Ars in response to articles on the in-progress shutoff of the traditional telephone network. "They have contacted me at least 10 to 20 times in the last year, including showing up unannounced on my doorstep to tell me they were switching me to FiOS," Kolling said. "So far I have managed to save my landline in this area, which is subject to power failures from hurricanes."

Power failures from hurricanes in Rhode Island? That happens in what, once a decade maybe?

FTA-
"I have two sick people in the house," Keys said. "Going through Hurricane Sandy, I had no power for 12 days, and I was the only one on the block who had phone service.

Ah - so the argument is based of what happened during a once-a-century storm...
Tell you what lady, if you want to keep the copper you need to pay fair share for maintaining it. I am sure that once the price reaches $100+ a month you will rethink your choices.

RI does get Nor'easters and other serious storms.  Any coastal area is at a higher risk at losing power due to weather events.

Still, fiber is the way of the future, and it's time to get people on board.  If she's concerned about connectivity in emergencies and lives in a storm prone area perhaps she should get a small generator to power essentials in the event of prolonged power outages.


Even accepting that, what does the landline get her? Why does it have anything to do with sick people? Who the fark are you calling if service is out, power is out, etc.? Power company? If you got hit by a storm bad enough to disable cell towers they're going to be out looking to fix stuff ASAP. Plus if the storm is bad enough to disable power AND cells, it's likely to have taken out your precious phone lines too...

TuteTibiImperes: America's internet infrastructure is woefully inadequate compared to a lot of other places in the world, and a lot of that has to do with the fact that we're still relying on copper wire laid down in the 20s.  I don't see why Verizon necessarily has to eliminate their copper network to lay down fiber, but if doing so allows them to lay down fiber faster and connect more homes, I'm for it.


I thought that 'America' as a whole being covered by a single contiguous country the size of 10 normal ones (say Europe) had a lot to do with that as well.  If we were like Europe, we'd be 50 small countries, each with incentive to lay out our own infrastructure and make sure it works, rather than allowing MaBell and co. to evil it up.
 
2014-08-16 11:48:48 PM  
Hmmm, copper lines you say...

/bbl, getting a pair of wire cutters
 
2014-08-16 11:57:18 PM  
I seem to recall the copper phone infrastructure rotting in the '70s because of high oil prices, rotting in the '80s because Reagan's recession killed easy credit, and rotting in the '90s because of MCI driving long distance prices down.  I don't remember anything from the '00s, but I was not paying attention most of that decade.

Phone companies wanting to skip keeping the physical plant up is not a new thing.
 
2014-08-16 11:57:28 PM  

kroonermanblack: Even accepting that, what does the landline get her? Why does it have anything to do with sick people? Who the fark are you calling if service is out, power is out, etc.? Power company? If you got hit by a storm bad enough to disable cell towers they're going to be out looking to fix stuff ASAP. Plus if the storm is bad enough to disable power AND cells, it's likely to have taken out your precious phone lines too...


If you live on a dead end in New England, you are last to get your power turned back on after any big storm. The idea used to be you keep the land line if you have to call the hospital or the fire department.

I think if you're worried about 8 hour + power outages, It's time to invest in a generator. Especially if you live on a dead end.
 
2014-08-17 12:25:46 AM  
Early 2000s, AT&T, (which I think is a different AT&T than today's AT&T) intentionally let its 2G system rot in order to coerce people to buy new 3G phones.
 
2014-08-17 12:26:30 AM  
A bit ago, we installed a propane powered generator (a Cummins Onan) that will power the entirety of the house for up to a month, as we also purchased a commercial sized underground tank and buried it. That combined with our solar system and 50+ year old copper telephone cables means that while we won't have phone service, we will have the power to watch movies and make popcorn until weather related issues get sorted.
 
2014-08-17 12:29:47 AM  
You guys really need to check out bbreports.com aka dslreports.com. Verizon been dumping Copper for years.
/At this rate we'll hear about Verizon slowing down FIOS build outs(it happening now in real life) in June 2015
 
2014-08-17 12:36:37 AM  
I spent 15+ years in Florida.

That's a lot of hurricanes with no power, btw.

2006 was fun. We had Frances, Jean, and Wilma hit in one season. That year, we went roughly 11 weeks without electric service.

Think about that a minute.

In Florida. Most of which was in August and September.

*

*

You'll get my true POTS lines out of my cold, dead hands. Through a combo of good luck and sheer willpower, we had working natural gas and pressurized city sewer and water service through that, so we got by with the house at 83-87ish degrees. Couldn't use the computers to game from 10 AM to roughly 9 PM, they'd overheat, otherwise we were semi-OK.

I don't give a flying fark at a rolling doughnut what the farking article says...you CANNOT get true POTS over fiber, because fiber can't transmit power. Period. End of discussion.
 
2014-08-17 12:41:25 AM  
I hate to complain, but that article provided no links at all to any cat videos.
 
2014-08-17 12:52:28 AM  
Local telecommunications monopolies bother me greatly.
 
2014-08-17 12:55:16 AM  

Slives: FTA -
"Verizon's efforts to force people off copper in my area of Rhode Island rise to the level of harassment," Verizon customer Karen Anne Kolling of North Kingstown, Rhode Island, told Ars.

Kolling is one of numerous Verizon customers who got in touch with Ars in response to articles on the in-progress shutoff of the traditional telephone network. "They have contacted me at least 10 to 20 times in the last year, including showing up unannounced on my doorstep to tell me they were switching me to FiOS," Kolling said. "So far I have managed to save my landline in this area, which is subject to power failures from hurricanes."

Power failures from hurricanes in Rhode Island? That happens in what, once a decade maybe?

FTA-
"I have two sick people in the house," Keys said. "Going through Hurricane Sandy, I had no power for 12 days, and I was the only one on the block who had phone service.

Ah - so the argument is based of what happened during a once-a-century storm...
Tell you what lady, if you want to keep the copper you need to pay fair share for maintaining it. I am sure that once the price reaches $100+ a month you will rethink your choices.


Telcos have to plan for worst case scenario due to regulations and copper is still reliable as long as its not 50+ years old which its not in most places. And soon they will be hitting 100mbps through upgraded equipment.
 
2014-08-17 12:59:24 AM  

RoyBatty: Early 2000s, AT&T, (which I think is a different AT&T than today's AT&T) intentionally let its 2G system rot in order to coerce people to buy new 3G phones.


Most 3g didnt go love until after the iPhone was released so it was a lot later.
 
2014-08-17 01:10:03 AM  

xaks: I don't give a flying fark at a rolling doughnut what the farking article says...you CANNOT get true POTS over fiber, because fiber can't transmit power. Period. End of discussion.


And because it is so important to you then you shouldn't mind paying for it. With few copper-wire customers left prepare for lousy service and high prices.
 
2014-08-17 01:11:04 AM  

steamingpile: RoyBatty: Early 2000s, AT&T, (which I think is a different AT&T than today's AT&T) intentionally let its 2G system rot in order to coerce people to buy new 3G phones.

Most 3g didnt go love until after the iPhone was released so it was a lot later.


Probably around 2006-7 when I had a couple of Treos on AT&T
 
2014-08-17 01:15:18 AM  

madgonad: xaks: I don't give a flying fark at a rolling doughnut what the farking article says...you CANNOT get true POTS over fiber, because fiber can't transmit power. Period. End of discussion.

And because it is so important to you then you shouldn't mind paying for it. With few copper-wire customers left prepare for lousy service and high prices.


And I don't.

If it comes down to "pay a reasonable amount for true POTS or go to FiOS", I would pay that reasonable amount in a heartbeat.

The definition of 'reasonable', however, is what is the sticker. Given the service record of these providers....well, I am not terribly hopeful.
 
2014-08-17 01:20:31 AM  

RoyBatty: Early 2000s, AT&T, (which I think is a different AT&T than today's AT&T) intentionally let its 2G system rot in order to coerce people to buy new 3G phones.


In San Fran, when AT&T shut down their 2G network to increase 3G capacity, they gave the 2G customers free 3G phones. I think they still had to do a contract upgrade to get them free, but if you were still using a 2G phone at the time of the changeover, you weren't the kind of person who changed carriers or upgraded phones a lot, so for them a 2 year contract isn't going to be a huge issue.
 
2014-08-17 01:21:19 AM  

madgonad: xaks: I don't give a flying fark at a rolling doughnut what the farking article says...you CANNOT get true POTS over fiber, because fiber can't transmit power. Period. End of discussion.

And because it is so important to you then you shouldn't mind paying for it. With few copper-wire customers left prepare for lousy service and high prices.


I have POTS copper.

I even have fios.  You should have heard the salespersons head exploding when I told him I wished to keep my copper service and also have Fios for internet.

I didn't have the real inclination to go into why it is better to keep it.  Sales people are usually morons.  Well, this one was an actual moron, but I digress.

My point is, I do pay more for my copper service.  We have the most basic service (outside of a dry loop/emergency only), which is no caller ID, no call waiting, and we pay for all local calls.  The service alone is ~30/month.

Anyways, Verizon did try to call us and offer us to keep our pots service but over Fiber.  This is separate from Fios, and is mentioned in the article. Told them to go scratch, I am keeping the POTS copper line until Verizon can legally make me drop it.

In IT/Networking for 15 years.
 
2014-08-17 01:24:41 AM  

Mad_Radhu: RoyBatty: Early 2000s, AT&T, (which I think is a different AT&T than today's AT&T) intentionally let its 2G system rot in order to coerce people to buy new 3G phones.

In San Fran, when AT&T shut down their 2G network to increase 3G capacity, they gave the 2G customers free 3G phones. I think they still had to do a contract upgrade to get them free, but if you were still using a 2G phone at the time of the changeover, you weren't the kind of person who changed carriers or upgraded phones a lot, so for them a 2 year contract isn't going to be a huge issue.


Out in Phoenix, or at least my experience, was they let it rot, and when I would complain of the poor service, they would just try to sell a new phone. No mention of a free phone.
 
2014-08-17 01:25:24 AM  

tripleseven: madgonad: xaks: I don't give a flying fark at a rolling doughnut what the farking article says...you CANNOT get true POTS over fiber, because fiber can't transmit power. Period. End of discussion.

And because it is so important to you then you shouldn't mind paying for it. With few copper-wire customers left prepare for lousy service and high prices.

I have POTS copper.

I even have fios.  You should have heard the salespersons head exploding when I told him I wished to keep my copper service and also have Fios for internet.

I didn't have the real inclination to go into why it is better to keep it.  Sales people are usually morons.  Well, this one was an actual moron, but I digress.

My point is, I do pay more for my copper service.  We have the most basic service (outside of a dry loop/emergency only), which is no caller ID, no call waiting, and we pay for all local calls.  The service alone is ~30/month.

Anyways, Verizon did try to call us and offer us to keep our pots service but over Fiber.  This is separate from Fios, and is mentioned in the article. Told them to go scratch, I am keeping the POTS copper line until Verizon can legally make me drop it.

In IT/Networking for 15 years.


*brofist

*IT\sysadmin\network engineer for two decades
 
2014-08-17 01:27:15 AM  
Verizon is just pissed that Google has mastered the art of government subsidized ISP to persons it can convince it will lose money on.
 
2014-08-17 01:55:20 AM  

Lsherm: TuteTibiImperes: Still, fiber is the way of the future, and it's time to get people on board.  If she's concerned about connectivity in emergencies and lives in a storm prone area perhaps she should get a small generator to power essentials in the event of prolonged power outages.

Spoken like an idiot who has never lived through a hurricane.

Genius, even if you have a generator, if you can't get gas for fuel for it then it won't last days. Most emergency generators can do at most 12 hours on 5 gallons of fuel. I'd keep 25 gallons on hand when I was living rural and that was fine for less than a week. Our longest power outage was 16 farking days. If the gas stations near you also don't have power, then you can't get fuel for the generator.

But here's the kicker: I had a land line and a cell phone with Verizon. Guess what also doesn't work without electricity? Your farking cell tower. Just like you, they have emergency generators that need fuel to run, but if the entire fuel supply infrastructure has broken down (seriously, you can't pump gas if the station doesn't have power) then you can't keep them running. And Verizon does not keep their rural cell towers running for any length of time after an extended power outage. It might be because they can't get diesel or propane to run the generators, or it might be because they don't give a shiat, but it doesn't change the fact that your cell phone doesn't work if it can't find a tower to connect to.

Our landline phones never went out. Power would go out, but the phone lines were buried in the ground near the turn of the century and they just kept kicking along. So unless Verizon is willing to get that level of reliability on their new services, fark 'em. And since they aren't subject to the same regulations that forced companies in 19-Goddamn-20 to build a network that worked during catastrophes, I'm not willing to give them the benefit of the doubt.

Christ, some of you people have no farking clue how infrastructure works.


Twelve hours on 5 gallons of fuel?

Yeah, that's why the generator I'm sizing up for installation here connects to my natural gas main. Can't remember the last time I heard about anyone losing gas service in this area.

Only problem is we just closed on the house at the end of April, and I have to reinflate the bank balance before the generator goes in.
 
2014-08-17 02:03:20 AM  

RoyBatty: Mad_Radhu: RoyBatty: Early 2000s, AT&T, (which I think is a different AT&T than today's AT&T) intentionally let its 2G system rot in order to coerce people to buy new 3G phones.

In San Fran, when AT&T shut down their 2G network to increase 3G capacity, they gave the 2G customers free 3G phones. I think they still had to do a contract upgrade to get them free, but if you were still using a 2G phone at the time of the changeover, you weren't the kind of person who changed carriers or upgraded phones a lot, so for them a 2 year contract isn't going to be a huge issue.

Out in Phoenix, or at least my experience, was they let it rot, and when I would complain of the poor service, they would just try to sell a new phone. No mention of a free phone.


I think I'm seeing Verizon do the same thing on the mobile network where I live as they migrate stuff to 4G. I've got an old flip phone (I know, I know, but it lets me be "not online" and still "available in case of emergency"), and I'm starting to see more and more dead areas and spots with marginal service (phone constantly searches, is successful about half the time). Often, my cell can't find a signal, but my work-provided 4G hotspot is rockin' and rollin'.
 
2014-08-17 02:12:05 AM  
Lsherm: P.S. - We were in the D.C. area over the 4th of July weekend in 2012, when the Derecho hit. No power for 5 days or so. (Renting, so no generator.)

Used the car to ride around in during the hottest part of the day, for A/C and to charge the phones. Fortunately, we had at least one working gas station in the area, and (mirabile dictu) it still had working credit card readers and an upstream connection.

Still, the morning after the crash, I was out looking to fill the tank and get cash from an AT if I could find one working. Had an emergency weather radio with a hand crank and output jacks to charge phones, too.

The office was good - no power to the building at all, but the diesel generator for my server room never missed a beat. We spent some time there to keep cool (and get internet), too.

Way off topic, but when folks start talking generators and infrastructure failures, this incident is always in the forefront of my mind.
 
2014-08-17 02:55:58 AM  

TuteTibiImperes: You could also get a solar battery charger that would be enough to power a FIOS phone if you don't want to go the generator route.


You're a special kind of genius, and I don't mean that in a nice way. You can have all the power in the goddamn world and that FIOS phone isn't going to do shiat if there's nothing to connect to. You can charge it up just like your cell phone and look at "no signal" for as long as it takes Verizon or anyone else to get their shiat back up and running. Copper lines are resilient because they require very low power and they were centralized a century ago.

I'd expect to see you on the street after a natural disaster with a fully charged cell phone stupidly wondering why you can't make any calls.

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: Yeah, that's why the generator I'm sizing up for installation here connects to my natural gas main. Can't remember the last time I heard about anyone losing gas service in this area.


Let's just pretend, for shiats and giggles, that there are vast swaths of the country that don't have natural gas mains, wired broadband internet, or local sewer lines. But they all have copper phone lines, because the government required it a century ago.

Farkers be delusional.
 
2014-08-17 03:03:28 AM  
In that case I'm keeping my farking antique landline.

Not one single time has that sh*t ever failed me. It is the copper goddamned Rock of Gibraltar.

Even though I barely use the blasted thing and I end up paying not only 30USD/month for it even though I'm in the "Lifeline" program {what a joke}, but an extra 8USD/month for AT&T long distance that I use maybe three times a year, for calling my bro in Wyoming to listen to him gleefully pee on his front lawn.
 
2014-08-17 03:05:02 AM  
And that reminds me, I gotta send this thread to my Finns.
 
2014-08-17 03:08:17 AM  

Lsherm: Guess what also doesn't work without electricity? Your farking cell tower. Just like you, they have emergency generators that need fuel to run, but if the entire fuel supply infrastructure has broken down (seriously, you can't pump gas if the station doesn't have power) then you can't keep them running.


What also needs power to operate: the phone substation that your land line is connected to, that's also using backup generators for power.

If you really want reliability in a catastrophe, get a satellite phone and a solar charger.
 
2014-08-17 03:23:05 AM  

doglover: Nabb1: doglover: Slives: Power failures

Never heard of 'em.

[cdn.instructables.com image 620x465]

That's all well and good, but sometimes the cell towers lose power.

The hell do I need cell towers for. Blackout = vacation from work. "Sorry boss, no interwebs."

Break out the beers, brats, and a hibachi and crank the tunes.


You. I like you.
 
2014-08-17 04:02:39 AM  
Hmmm, copper lines you say.../bbl, getting a pair of wire cutters

gaslamppost.files.wordpress.com
/don't gis power line electrocution
//just don't
 
2014-08-17 04:04:13 AM  

Sum Dum Gai: Lsherm: Guess what also doesn't work without electricity? Your farking cell tower. Just like you, they have emergency generators that need fuel to run, but if the entire fuel supply infrastructure has broken down (seriously, you can't pump gas if the station doesn't have power) then you can't keep them running.

What also needs power to operate: the phone substation that your land line is connected to, that's also using backup generators for power.

If you really want reliability in a catastrophe, get a satellite phone and a solar charger.


The phone substation was required by an act of Congress a century ago to work during an emergency, so they do. The entire system works because it was regulated from the beginning.

What doesnt work? VOIP.  It's not regulated, nor required to work.
 
2014-08-17 04:15:49 AM  
We get crummy cell signal and plenty of hurricanes, so yeah I'm keeping the landline.
 
2014-08-17 04:35:39 AM  
I live out in the middle of nowhere.  No cable, no utilities, and when the power goes out, it can be out for a week, and let me tell you, it goes down often.  We get everything from storms that make Katrina look like a fart, to random drunks KO'ing utility poles.

We have POTS, and probably only because it's mandated.  I called up Comcast, inquiring on the fiber line they're installing down my road, and they basically told me to go fark myself unless I wanted to pay for installation 1/4mi on county land.  The fiber line they're installing is for a group of five homes further down the beach.

They've been installing that line for five years.

I think I'll just stick with copper for now.
 
2014-08-17 05:02:41 AM  
Copper is frankly underappreciated  element. Surely it is not strong as iron, it is not electrically conductive as silver, nor lustrous as gold . It is still a good jack of all trade sort of thing metal. I wonder  why Verizon could not simply cut them out , refine them sell them , since they still fetch high prices somewhere else.
 
2014-08-17 05:21:13 AM  
I'm kind of unnerved at the indifference about the disposal of historically very robust systems. They may not be the latest and greatest, but as a backup in case of emergency (weather-related or otherwise) it's nice to know that while you can't check your email, you can put through calls when you need to.
 
2014-08-17 06:02:30 AM  
They say there's no cure for stupid, but I've seen cats smeared across the road many times. Put that one on Snopes.
 
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