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(ABC2News Baltimore)   We've replaced the water in the Baltimore harbor with three million gallons of sewage. Let's see if anyone notices   (abc2news.com ) divider line
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5927 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 Aug 2014 at 10:39 PM (1 year ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-08-16 01:52:14 AM  
I have heard that one of the biggest problems with Chesapeake bay is that it gets so much chicken shiat in it from chicken farms around it. Plus in areas like this, there is the urban runoff which isn't great either. So basically, the water is shiatty before any human shiat has been added.

We need to treat farms like factories under the Clean Water Act and force them to contain their pollution. But we're probably too stupid right now to do anything smart environmentally, hell, we can't even get mountaintop removal mining banned.
 
2014-08-16 01:57:23 AM  
Aw c'mon, do we really have to drag the politics tab in to a poop thread?  Isn't that redundant or something?
 
2014-08-16 02:03:18 AM  
Surely they can afford infrastructure after all these profitable wars we've been winning for the last decade.
 
2014-08-16 02:08:54 AM  

Slam1263: Mrtraveler01: fickenchucker: ///And fark you a second time if you think Libs are smarter than Cons

When you have people like Rand Paul and Sarah Palin representing your movement.

Coming from a party that supports Pelosi, Reid, and that cast of thousands?

Your party is a movement of bowels.


So what does that make the Republicans then? Diarrhea?
 
2014-08-16 02:28:23 AM  
Not sure if they were for clean water or dirty, but I've seen pipes made of hollowed out trees.
 
2014-08-16 03:17:26 AM  

Manfred J. Hattan: Aw c'mon, do we really have to drag the politics tab in to a poop thread?  Isn't that redundant or something?


bunchofbears.jpg
 
2014-08-16 04:05:44 AM  

fickenchucker: And this is news why? Milwaukee sees your 3,000,000 gallons, and raises 333,600,000.

http://wisconsindailyindependent.com/336-2-million-gallons-of-sewage -d umped-in-lake-michigan/

/farking combined sewers in Shorewood and Milwaukee because the Dems are short-sighted idiots.
//And fark you if you can't see the partison reality--these are the same assholes who think trolleys and light-rail are economically good ideas.
///And fark you a second time if you think Libs are smarter than Cons--104 people died because Dems run the city and cheaped out on our water quality  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1993_Milwaukee_Cryptosporidiosis_outbrea k
////We have the best water in the country since then, with improved machinery and technology, so that's nice...


So that's where Milwaukee gets it's water for beer from.
 
2014-08-16 04:07:23 AM  
Runoff from Art Modell's grave.

/ Go Browns!
// Fark you, Art
 
2014-08-16 04:45:16 AM  
 
2014-08-16 07:06:48 AM  

Boo_Guy: Too much poop,  no swimming
[i539.photobucket.com image 850x637]


The bacteria got a buzz on?
 
2014-08-16 08:15:40 AM  
I'm one of those people that likes to read while I'm having a shiat.

In other news, I'm banned from Barnes & Noble.
 
2014-08-16 08:22:03 AM  
You people need to stop shiatting so much.
 
2014-08-16 08:53:46 AM  

kqc7011: When you figure out the gallons spilled to the volume of water in the Chesapeake. The actual amount of sewage is minimal. Plus most sewage is roughly 99% water to start with.

There will be some bugs that manage to survive for a short time, but there already are enough bad bugs living in the water to start with anyway.


Oh sure, dilution and all that. Trouble is, the bay might as well already be sewage because of just how beat up it is from stuff similar to this happening every day.
 
2014-08-16 09:27:06 AM  
You know how Baltimore could prevent this AND beautify their decaying shiat-hole of a town? Bulldoze all the vacant tenements, hydro-seed the fark out of the resultant patches of bare earth ( most of those dilapidated row houses have unfinished basements with dirt floors anyway) and create new green spaces to soak up all of that runoff while removing hundreds if not thousands of crack houses and stash houses from the city.
 
2014-08-16 09:34:36 AM  

adamatari: I have heard that one of the biggest problems with Chesapeake bay is that it gets so much chicken shiat in it from chicken farms around it. Plus in areas like this, there is the urban runoff which isn't great either. So basically, the water is shiatty before any human shiat has been added.

We need to treat farms like factories under the Clean Water Act and force them to contain their pollution. But we're probably too stupid right now to do anything smart environmentally, hell, we can't even get mountaintop removal mining banned.


Baltimore city is under a federal consent decree forcing them to upgrade the sewer system. And as others have said, a combined system gets over run with either water or sewage, it will overflow into the other system. Even then the replacement takes time, what with water lines breaking all over the city.

Then there are the overflows from the county to contend with when you get six inches of rain in a day.

And don't get me started on the farms in Pennsylvania that dump fertilizer and sediment into the Susquehanna. Everyone likes to blame Baltimore city for the Chesapeake's problem, but the watershed extends all the way too New York state.
 
2014-08-16 09:39:09 AM  

Lsherm: tzzhc4: Lsherm: It rained like a motherfarker on Tuesday. shiat like this happens.

Only if you live someplace where the storm and sanitary sewers are connected. In modern cities this isn't the case.

It's Baltimore, their entire sewer system is a hodge-podge of 300 year old and newer systems. It happens in New York, too.

It's not an unusual occurrence.


All the old coastal cities are like this.  Many places have prehistoric combined storm/sewer systems.  When it rains hard the treatment plants can't keep up, so they open the valves and let it flow straight into the nearest river or harbor.  Boston, NYC, North Jersey, Philly, Baltimore.....all the way down the East Coast.   The solution would be to replace those 100+ year old sewer systems, except we can't because socialism.
 
2014-08-16 09:42:18 AM  
Just happen to be re-reading Zodiac this week. Same shiat, wrong bay. LOL?
 
2014-08-16 11:01:39 AM  
Looking at the picture in the linked article, is that a Brown Trout that I see?

I was also hoping to see a canoe trying to navigate against the current without a means of propulsion.
 
2014-08-16 01:09:26 PM  

adamatari: We need to treat farms like factories under the Clean Water Act and force them to contain their pollution. But we're probably too stupid right now to do anything smart environmentally, hell, we can't even get mountaintop removal mining banned.


There you go, talking sense on Fark. You should be ashamed of yourself.
 
2014-08-16 10:40:02 PM  

Fissile: The solution would be to replace those 100+ year old sewer systems, except we can't because socialism.


It's not "because socialism" - it's because it's farking expensive as all hell and the money might not be there to do it. I worked for an engineering firm for a few years that would smoke test sewer lines in old towns to find leaks and recommend repairs or upgrades, and you can't just "replace" a sewer system. Many of the older lines are either inaccessible or impossible to upgrade, but digging new lines would be prohibitively expensive, especially for towns that were built up around an industry that left. Most of the work we did were for old coal towns, and the tax base to replace anything left long ago.

The other problem that pops up is that a century or more ago, sewer lines were not separate from storm lines, and in either case whenever people went digging they did it in open areas if at all possible. Fast forward to the present and now you have streets, buildings, phone lines, cable, gas lines, and god knows what else stacked on top of that old sewer line. Your only option is to move a main line to another open area, but then you still have to connect it back to where the buildings are.  That means you're digging up streets, phone lines, cable, gas lines, and god knows what else.

One town in Western Maryland that was built almost entirely on a hill leading down to a river had a problem because their main sewer line down the hill filled up during heavy rainstorms, thus flooding basements in houses near the bottom of the hill as the water pressure built up.  We came in, surveyed and tested everything, and came to the conclusion that they could dig out the 120 year old main line and make it bigger for about $40 million, or they could set up a pool halfway up the hill and redirect water to that during rainstorms and drain it later for $3 million. Naturally, they chose to do nothing, but if they had the money they probably would have gone for option #2.
 
2014-08-16 11:33:23 PM  

Lsherm: Fissile: The solution would be to replace those 100+ year old sewer systems, except we can't because socialism.

It's not "because socialism" - it's because it's farking expensive as all hell and the money might not be there to do it. I worked for an engineering firm for a few years that would smoke test sewer lines in old towns to find leaks and recommend repairs or upgrades, and you can't just "replace" a sewer system. Many of the older lines are either inaccessible or impossible to upgrade, but digging new lines would be prohibitively expensive, especially for towns that were built up around an industry that left. Most of the work we did were for old coal towns, and the tax base to replace anything left long ago.

The other problem that pops up is that a century or more ago, sewer lines were not separate from storm lines, and in either case whenever people went digging they did it in open areas if at all possible. Fast forward to the present and now you have streets, buildings, phone lines, cable, gas lines, and god knows what else stacked on top of that old sewer line. Your only option is to move a main line to another open area, but then you still have to connect it back to where the buildings are.  That means you're digging up streets, phone lines, cable, gas lines, and god knows what else.

One town in Western Maryland that was built almost entirely on a hill leading down to a river had a problem because their main sewer line down the hill filled up during heavy rainstorms, thus flooding basements in houses near the bottom of the hill as the water pressure built up.  We came in, surveyed and tested everything, and came to the conclusion that they could dig out the 120 year old main line and make it bigger for about $40 million, or they could set up a pool halfway up the hill and redirect water to that during rainstorms and drain it later for $3 million. Naturally, they chose to do nothing, but if they had the money they probably would have gone for option #2.


People seem to think that all it would take is digging a hole and slapping in some pipe. That's what caused the problems in the first place back before water quality and the EPA were out there. The reality is that studies need to be done, then studies made of those studies to make sure that they are accurate, then a whole farkton of paperwork get filed and gone over with a fine toothed comb. Then maybe, if the town or city has the money, work can start. And the work is almost never cut and dried. Wastewater pipes have to have a certain amount of slope, it's not as severe of a slope like in a house but it still has to slope. And when the pipe is a couple of miles long that can mean that it's pretty deep by the time it gets to the treatment plant, unless they use pump stations, but then those are not cheap to build, operate or maintain either. Not only for the big pit that you have to build and the pumps but also things like an emergency generator and monitoring equipment so it's an ongoing expense (unlike a pipe)

It's a long and complicated process and decision tree going from, we should fix that to ok, it's fixed. And long and complicated always means expensive.
 
2014-08-16 11:59:57 PM  

tkrispin: adamatari: I have heard that one of the biggest problems with Chesapeake bay is that it gets so much chicken shiat in it from chicken farms around it. Plus in areas like this, there is the urban runoff which isn't great either. So basically, the water is shiatty before any human shiat has been added.

We need to treat farms like factories under the Clean Water Act and force them to contain their pollution. But we're probably too stupid right now to do anything smart environmentally, hell, we can't even get mountaintop removal mining banned.

Baltimore city is under a federal consent decree forcing them to upgrade the sewer system. And as others have said, a combined system gets over run with either water or sewage, it will overflow into the other system. Even then the replacement takes time, what with water lines breaking all over the city.

Then there are the overflows from the county to contend with when you get six inches of rain in a day.

And don't get me started on the farms in Pennsylvania that dump fertilizer and sediment into the Susquehanna. Everyone likes to blame Baltimore city for the Chesapeake's problem, but the watershed extends all the way too New York state.


The problems of the mid-Atlantic states almost all originate in the State of New York. It's like standing under a porta-potty.
 
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