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(ABC2News Baltimore)   We've replaced the water in the Baltimore harbor with three million gallons of sewage. Let's see if anyone notices   (abc2news.com) divider line 72
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5845 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 Aug 2014 at 10:39 PM (17 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-08-15 09:32:03 PM  
It rained like a motherfarker on Tuesday. shiat like this happens.
 
2014-08-15 09:50:02 PM  
I'm guessing no

/well, except the smell is better
 
2014-08-15 10:24:41 PM  
I wonder what State Senator Clay Davis would say about this with a single twenty-seven syllable word?
 
2014-08-15 10:29:03 PM  

Mr. Coffee Nerves: I wonder what State Senator Clay Davis would say about this with a single twenty-seven syllable word?


Or, more accurately, a single-syllable word stretched out for twenty-seven seconds
 
2014-08-15 10:41:21 PM  
We will, might smell better
 
2014-08-15 10:45:31 PM  
That's a huge crock of shiat.
 
2014-08-15 10:45:52 PM  
As a born-&-raised Baltimoron, I say they must have that factoid backward: it's more likely that they got 3 million gallons of water into a Harbor full of sewage.

At least it quit smelling like dead fish when all the fish died. You know, like you can't get one more drink from an empty bottle.
 
2014-08-15 10:46:01 PM  
In the summer, it'd be kinda hard to tell.
 
2014-08-15 10:47:45 PM  
By the way, they should separate rain run-off from the sewer system.
 
2014-08-15 10:48:46 PM  

Lsherm: It rained like a motherfarker on Tuesday. shiat like this happens.


Only if you live someplace where the storm and sanitary sewers are connected. In modern cities this isn't the case.
 
2014-08-15 10:52:10 PM  
The water will give you crabs.
 
2014-08-15 10:53:00 PM  

img.fark.net

 
2014-08-15 10:53:15 PM  

tzzhc4: Lsherm: It rained like a motherfarker on Tuesday. shiat like this happens.

Only if you live someplace where the storm and sanitary sewers are connected. In modern cities this isn't the case.


It's Baltimore, their entire sewer system is a hodge-podge of 300 year old and newer systems. It happens in New York, too.

It's not an unusual occurrence.
 
2014-08-15 10:54:43 PM  
Pipe the runoff to California
 
2014-08-15 10:54:43 PM  
In Baltimore? Unlikely.....
 
2014-08-15 10:56:45 PM  
Who else is hungry for some Chesapeake oysters right now?
 
2014-08-15 10:58:17 PM  

drjekel_mrhyde: Pipe the runoff to California

media0.giphy.com
 
2014-08-15 10:58:48 PM  
Is it downhill?
 
2014-08-15 10:58:54 PM  

Lsherm: It rained like a motherfarker on Tuesday. shiat like this happens.


Yep, especially with older collection systems or combined systems. It can take a day or less before the rainwater infiltrates older clay pipes (which most places still have). Schedule 40 PVC is the standard now but for a long time it was all clay, and a city isn't going to take on the expense (and the disruption) of replacing it. Some of them spray a lining on them but more often than not the leak is related to roots breaking the pipes and that's not going to be something that you can patch.

I've seen a meter go from a trickle to full on flooding in less than an hour. The plant that that happened at was designed for 6.3 millions of gallons per day just because of infiltration (most days it rarely broke 2 million gallons). There's not a whole lot that the plant operator can do about it other than put more tanks in service. But sometimes you run out of tanks.
 
2014-08-15 10:58:59 PM  
Meanwhile, the Back River is envious.
 
2014-08-15 11:03:45 PM  

Radioactive Ass: Yep, especially with older collection systems or combined systems. It can take a day or less before the rainwater infiltrates older clay pipes (which most places still have). Schedule 40 PVC is the standard now but for a long time it was all clay, and a city isn't going to take on the expense (and the disruption) of replacing it. Some of them spray a lining on them but more often than not the leak is related to roots breaking the pipes and that's not going to be something that you can patch.


You can't expect them to replace it all at once, but hopefully they're trying to replace it bit by bit before it overwhelms them.
 
2014-08-15 11:06:53 PM  
Funny, Frank never has two cups at home...
 
2014-08-15 11:08:06 PM  

tzzhc4: Only if you live someplace where the storm and sanitary sewers are connected. In modern cities this isn't the case


Infiltration is usually the culprit, not a combined system. The plant is designed to meet a certain load and combined systems have to take that into account. As I said above, I've seen the flow jump in a system that wasn't combined, just older pipes.
 
2014-08-15 11:09:39 PM  
That was the worst season of The Wire: the Department of Water and Sewage season.
 
2014-08-15 11:11:44 PM  

gfid: You can't expect them to replace it all at once, but hopefully they're trying to replace it bit by bit before it overwhelms them.


Cities are notoriously cheap and digging up a street isn't cheap. Digging up all of them is certainly out of the question. Most of the time the "Fix" is just to increase the capacity at the wastewater treatment plant.
 
2014-08-15 11:12:54 PM  
This happens multiple times a year, with any significant rain event. The incumbency rate in Maryland is astronomical so I suppose there's little consequence to politicians who refuse to spend money on infrastructure projects. More satisfying to spend it on cronies and pet projects obviously.
 
2014-08-15 11:19:00 PM  
Nobody goes in the water there anyway.  At least not to swim.
 
2014-08-15 11:29:22 PM  
1.bp.blogspot.com

Who Run Bartertown Baltimore?
 
2014-08-15 11:29:58 PM  
great. now the harbor smells like Earl Crown
 
2014-08-15 11:32:47 PM  
One day a real rain will come...
 
2014-08-15 11:39:31 PM  
You're soaking in it.
 
2014-08-15 11:42:26 PM  
So the Clay Davis reference didn't come until 12 posts into this thread.

Fark, I am disappoint
 
2014-08-15 11:42:52 PM  
I love it
 
2014-08-15 11:44:15 PM  
Too much poop,  no swimming
i539.photobucket.com
 
2014-08-15 11:58:40 PM  
When you figure out the gallons spilled to the volume of water in the Chesapeake. The actual amount of sewage is minimal. Plus most sewage is roughly 99% water to start with.

There will be some bugs that manage to survive for a short time, but there already are enough bad bugs living in the water to start with anyway.
 
2014-08-16 12:00:04 AM  
Are we talking about good sewage or the bad kind. Because that makes a big difference in how I feel about this.
 
2014-08-16 12:04:37 AM  

kqc7011: When you figure out the gallons spilled to the volume of water in the Chesapeake. The actual amount of sewage is minimal. Plus most sewage is roughly 99% water to start with.


Well the Chesapeake already has shiat dumping into it from runoff in the Baltimore-DC area, more sewage is the last thing that waterway needs.
 
2014-08-16 12:22:31 AM  
img.fark.net
 
2014-08-16 12:26:36 AM  
The triathlon is now a biathlon. Man up.
 
2014-08-16 12:27:56 AM  

Tony_Pepperoni: [img.fark.net image 850x637]


Saved =)
 
2014-08-16 12:28:00 AM  

Mr. Coffee Nerves: Mr. Coffee Nerves: I wonder what State Senator Clay Davis would say about this with a single twenty-seven syllable word?

Or, more accurately, a single-syllable word stretched out for twenty-seven seconds


Shhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhheeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiite
 
2014-08-16 12:34:48 AM  

gfid: Radioactive Ass: Yep, especially with older collection systems or combined systems. It can take a day or less before the rainwater infiltrates older clay pipes (which most places still have). Schedule 40 PVC is the standard now but for a long time it was all clay, and a city isn't going to take on the expense (and the disruption) of replacing it. Some of them spray a lining on them but more often than not the leak is related to roots breaking the pipes and that's not going to be something that you can patch.

You can't expect them to replace it all at once, but hopefully they're trying to replace it bit by bit before it overwhelms them.


BGE has been replacing the gas main and feeder lines around my block. We're into our third month now and they're just starting on the feeders.

Three months. One block.

Mind you, they're not replacing the water mains while the street is already opened up. That's be too intelligent. And we've had two water main breaks on my street so far this summer.
 
2014-08-16 12:37:40 AM  

jake_lex: So the Clay Davis reference didn't come until 12 posts into this thread.

Fark, I am disappoint


Um... comments #3 & 4?
 
2014-08-16 12:54:47 AM  
And this is news why? Milwaukee sees your 3,000,000 gallons, and raises 333,600,000.

http://wisconsindailyindependent.com/336-2-million-gallons-of-sewage -d umped-in-lake-michigan/

/farking combined sewers in Shorewood and Milwaukee because the Dems are short-sighted idiots.
//And fark you if you can't see the partison reality--these are the same assholes who think trolleys and light-rail are economically good ideas.
///And fark you a second time if you think Libs are smarter than Cons--104 people died because Dems run the city and cheaped out on our water quality  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1993_Milwaukee_Cryptosporidiosis_outbrea k
////We have the best water in the country since then, with improved machinery and technology, so that's nice...
 
2014-08-16 12:55:43 AM  

Lsherm: tzzhc4: Lsherm: It rained like a motherfarker on Tuesday. shiat like this happens.

Only if you live someplace where the storm and sanitary sewers are connected. In modern cities this isn't the case.

It's Baltimore, their entire sewer system is a hodge-podge of 300 year old and newer systems. It happens in New York, too.

It's not an unusual occurrence.


Just saying if they spent money on fixing the damn sewer it wouldn't happen. New York is a mess.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/20/nyregion/20aqueduct.html?_r=0
 
2014-08-16 01:30:21 AM  
encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com

I love the shiat out of you!

What?! Me too beeyotch! DOOSES!
 
2014-08-16 01:40:56 AM  

fickenchucker: ///And fark you a second time if you think Libs are smarter than Cons


When you have people like Rand Paul and Sarah Palin representing your movement.
 
2014-08-16 01:50:01 AM  

Mrtraveler01: fickenchucker: ///And fark you a second time if you think Libs are smarter than Cons

When you have people like Rand Paul and Sarah Palin representing your movement.



Point taken.  I'm talking local politics.  Our national icons are often lacking. But don't pretend BO is doing a good job.

/Tom Barrett, mayor of Milwaukee, is a farking idiot.
//And yes, I would say that to his face.
 
2014-08-16 01:50:08 AM  

Mrtraveler01: fickenchucker: ///And fark you a second time if you think Libs are smarter than Cons

When you have people like Rand Paul and Sarah Palin representing your movement.


Coming from a party that supports Pelosi, Reid, and that cast of thousands?

Your party is a movement of bowels.
 
2014-08-16 01:51:00 AM  

Boo_Guy: Tony_Pepperoni: [img.fark.net image 850x637]

Saved =)


That's not allowed. DRRRRRREEEEEEWWWWWWWWWWW! Haaaha-haha-I'm touching base, motherfarker.
 
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