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(Huffington Post UK)   What nobody tells you about owning an electric car. This is good reading for when you and your stupid Volt are on the side of the highway waiting for a tow truck   (huffingtonpost.co.uk) divider line 111
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8726 clicks; posted to Geek » on 14 Aug 2014 at 3:13 PM (17 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-08-14 01:28:56 PM  
If you own a Volt and can't figure out THAT IT RUNS ON GAS TOO and still manage to get stranded on the side of the road, you deserve to be summarily executed on the spot.
 
2014-08-14 01:30:40 PM  

markie_farkie: If you own a Volt and can't figure out THAT IT RUNS ON GAS TOO and still manage to get stranded on the side of the road, you deserve to be summarily executed on the spot.


Yep, agree.
 
2014-08-14 01:33:39 PM  
The story is dumb enough (most people in the US, other than in large cities, have driveways and/or garages), but submitter's headline is even dumber.
 
2014-08-14 01:35:07 PM  
Author sounds like a self indulgent prat.
 
2014-08-14 01:55:22 PM  

Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: Author sounds like a self indulgent prat.


Pratwunt!
 
2014-08-14 01:56:55 PM  
Came in here to point out that the Volt is a hybrid, leaving redundantly.
 
2014-08-14 02:15:22 PM  
So, if I'm reading that correctly, the big "problem" with her Volt is that she feels bad if she allows it to revert to hybrid mode?  Oh the humanity.
 
2014-08-14 02:24:58 PM  

markie_farkie: Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: Author sounds like a self indulgent prat.

Pratwunt!


Ah, the rare triple-portmanteu... a "trimanteu" if you will.
 
2014-08-14 02:35:33 PM  

Angela Lansbury's Merkin: So, if I'm reading that correctly, the big "problem" with her Volt is that she feels bad if she allows it to revert to hybrid mode?  Oh the humanity.


Apparently so. But the whole selling point of a Hybrid is that you aren't SOL if you run out of charge. It's a goddamn perk.
 
2014-08-14 03:15:16 PM  
"...I gloated so much about my principles and how happy I was to be doing my bit for the environment that to admit that the reality of life on the un-polluted, open road has been surprisingly difficult, pains me."

25.media.tumblr.com
 
2014-08-14 03:22:53 PM  
Why do I want to perform a KHITBASH on that author?
 
2014-08-14 03:23:29 PM  
It's hard to tell if there's more to the story because it ended with an ellipsis but failed to link to a second page.

At any rate, it is unwise to buy a vehicle that needs to be plugged in if you don't own a driveway or garage to charge it in. You end up like this person who desperately circles a busy city trying to find a working public-use charger.
 
2014-08-14 03:24:26 PM  

AGremlin: "...I gloated so much about my principles and how happy I was to be doing my bit for the environment that to admit that the reality of life on the un-polluted, open road has been surprisingly difficult, pains me."

[25.media.tumblr.com image 450x253]


Perfect
 
2014-08-14 03:24:51 PM  

markie_farkie: If you own a Volt and can't figure out THAT IT RUNS ON GAS TOO and still manage to get stranded on the side of the road, you deserve to be summarily executed on the spot.


I don't own a Volt, but I thought it was marketed as a car that can run on electric 100% of the time, and gas is optional for "extending the range" or something like that.
 
2014-08-14 03:27:40 PM  
If you buy an electric car without an ability to recharge it where you park it and you don't want to use petrol, you are an idiot.
 
2014-08-14 03:28:02 PM  

Arkanaut: markie_farkie: If you own a Volt and can't figure out THAT IT RUNS ON GAS TOO and still manage to get stranded on the side of the road, you deserve to be summarily executed on the spot.

I don't own a Volt, but I thought it was marketed as a car that can run on electric 100% of the time, and gas is optional for "extending the range" or something like that.


It is, but I think the range on pure electric is only about 30 miles or less.
 
2014-08-14 03:28:04 PM  

Arkanaut: markie_farkie: If you own a Volt and can't figure out THAT IT RUNS ON GAS TOO and still manage to get stranded on the side of the road, you deserve to be summarily executed on the spot.

I don't own a Volt, but I thought it was marketed as a car that can run on electric 100% of the time, and gas is optional for "extending the range" or something like that.


Nope.  It isn't.  That would be the BMW i3 with a REX (range extender) you may be thinking about.  The Volt makes no such claim.
 
2014-08-14 03:29:09 PM  
It's kinda refreshing hearing a British woman complaining about electric cars instead of a Yank male (with an insulted penis).
 
2014-08-14 03:31:39 PM  

Arkanaut: markie_farkie: If you own a Volt and can't figure out THAT IT RUNS ON GAS TOO and still manage to get stranded on the side of the road, you deserve to be summarily executed on the spot.

I don't own a Volt, but I thought it was marketed as a car that can run on electric 100% of the time, and gas is optional for "extending the range" or something like that.


It can run on electric. If you can farking charge it. It also has a fuel use mode for when the battery dies. This is a generator, rather than a motor. The generator simply runs the electric systems same as the battery would have.

The issue here is that she bought a plug in vehicle without a place to charge it.

Anyone here have an electric motorcycle by chance? I've been eyeballing them for a while. Seem pretty cool.
 
2014-08-14 03:32:33 PM  
If your Volt is on the side of the road, you're a dumbfark for running it out of gas.

The same thing would happen to Subby's TransAm.
 
2014-08-14 03:38:53 PM  
I don't get it.  AFAIK there aren't any (practical) cars that operate on a fuel source that requires absolutely zero maintenance.  Why would a Volt be any different?

I've always considered running out of fuel to be one of the most singularly stupid things a person can do.  I'm always pretty aware of how much I have, and when I'll need to refill - even if that is days in the future.
 
2014-08-14 03:44:05 PM  
Anyone here have an electric motorcycle by chance? I've been eyeballing them for a while. Seem pretty cool.

Apparently electric bikes are a hot item in China. Go to/from work, then carry it into your apartment to charge it overnight.

Electric vehicles are not really going to become popular until the batteries get better, which doesn't look likely, what with the physics you're up against. They keep talking about fuzzy anode batteries, which have huge storage capacity, but they don't seem to last for very many recharge cycles.......
 
2014-08-14 03:46:11 PM  

brandent: Arkanaut: markie_farkie: If you own a Volt and can't figure out THAT IT RUNS ON GAS TOO and still manage to get stranded on the side of the road, you deserve to be summarily executed on the spot.

I don't own a Volt, but I thought it was marketed as a car that can run on electric 100% of the time, and gas is optional for "extending the range" or something like that.

Nope.  It isn't.  That would be the BMW i3 with a REX (range extender) you may be thinking about.  The Volt makes no such claim.


The Volt works basically the same way, it will run on pure electricity for up to x miles (generally 30-50 depending on how you drive) and then convert to gas mode.

If you drive less than the electric range most days you'll end up rarely using any gas.

It will force the engine on from time to time to circulate fluids and burn some gas so that it doesn't get too stale however.

I've been considering one, but I don't have a garage, and no outlet next to my driveway.  I need to get an estimate on having one of the 240volt chargers installed or at the least a 120volt outlet at the end of my driveway.
 
2014-08-14 03:47:05 PM  

kroonermanblack: The issue here is that she bought a plug in vehicle without a place to charge it.


Yup, that's the crux of her problem. And it shows her to be really really damn stupid. EVs can be great for people who have their own off-street parking. If that isn't you, you aren't ready to give up internal combustion engines yet.

While the Volt can run on gas, the real benefit to owning one is the EV mode... if you can't charge it yourself, you may as well save thousands of dollars and buy a much less expensive compact car. That $20,000 or so will pay a hell of a lot of taxes and buy gas for what might well be the lifetime of the car. And no worries about whether you can plug it in.
 
2014-08-14 03:47:21 PM  

Arkanaut: I don't own a Volt, but I thought it was marketed as a car that can run on electric 100% of the time, and gas is optional for "extending the range" or something like that.


They can market it however they want. The product they actually built is a plug-in hybrid with some firmware tweaks to disable the gas engine unless the battery is below a certain charge level.
 
2014-08-14 03:48:55 PM  
Waaaahh! I bought a car (likely with big tax incentives) and now the public hasn't installed enough charging stations for my convenience! I'm better than you losers with your IC motors, but you still need to subsidize my green-liness.
 
2014-08-14 03:49:46 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: I've been considering one, but I don't have a garage, and no outlet next to my driveway.  I need to get an estimate on having one of the 240volt chargers installed or at the least a 120volt outlet at the end of my driveway.


I'm not sure I'd get an EV without a 240V charger. Sure, you can charge it overnight out of a normal outlet, but sometimes you don't want to wait overnight. It just makes the car that much more usable for you. I want to say the price is likely to be a few thousand bucks to get it all installed and ready to go. The long term savings for that EV is balanced by one hell of a buy-in. And you'd better hope you don't need to do a lot of driving during an extended power outage if it's your only vehicle.

I like the idea of an EV as a second car, not really sold on one as a sole vehicle.
 
2014-08-14 03:54:15 PM  
In before "All Teslas ever built have caught fire".
 
2014-08-14 03:56:02 PM  
And, while you're stuck with a dead-Volt lock, every Ford Excursion with a 44-gallon tank and a mileage
rating measured in gallons per mile, whizzes by....and says,  "HA HA!"
 
2014-08-14 03:57:28 PM  

akula: TuteTibiImperes: I've been considering one, but I don't have a garage, and no outlet next to my driveway.  I need to get an estimate on having one of the 240volt chargers installed or at the least a 120volt outlet at the end of my driveway.

I'm not sure I'd get an EV without a 240V charger. Sure, you can charge it overnight out of a normal outlet, but sometimes you don't want to wait overnight. It just makes the car that much more usable for you. I want to say the price is likely to be a few thousand bucks to get it all installed and ready to go. The long term savings for that EV is balanced by one hell of a buy-in. And you'd better hope you don't need to do a lot of driving during an extended power outage if it's your only vehicle.

I like the idea of an EV as a second car, not really sold on one as a sole vehicle.


One reason I like the Volt over a pure EV is that if there is a power outage, or I need to drive somewhere before I can charge, I can just run it in gas mode, where it's still very efficient.

What I'm looking at with the 240v charger is how future proof it will be - will the one that works for the Volt today work for a Tesla in five years, or even the next-generation Volt?
 
2014-08-14 04:00:01 PM  

Ivo Shandor: Arkanaut: I don't own a Volt, but I thought it was marketed as a car that can run on electric 100% of the time, and gas is optional for "extending the range" or something like that.

They can market it however they want. The product they actually built is a plug-in hybrid with some firmware tweaks to disable the gas engine unless the battery is below a certain charge level.


Not really, a hybrid's engine drives the wheels most of the time. The volt's motor drives the wheels, the engine powers the motor.
 
2014-08-14 04:02:25 PM  

Li'l Robbie: And, while you're stuck with a dead-Volt lock, every Ford Excursion with a 44-gallon tank and a mileage
rating measured in gallons per mile, whizzes by....and says,  "HA HA!"


The Volt has 300+ miles when filled up. Repeat as necessary at your local gas station.
 
2014-08-14 04:04:08 PM  
Here's a thought about hybrids like Volt, which will operate on electric most of the time if you just use it as a neighborhood runabout most of the time: What if the engine won't run when you need it? If you don't use an engine regularly without storage prep gasoline goes stale, varnishes the line, fouls plugs, oil separates, water condenses, lifters go dry. So, that day you decide to drive out of town with your Volt, you get up to speed and it tries to go into gasoline mode, what does it do when the engine won't start?
 
2014-08-14 04:05:55 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: akula: TuteTibiImperes: I've been considering one, but I don't have a garage, and no outlet next to my driveway.  I need to get an estimate on having one of the 240volt chargers installed or at the least a 120volt outlet at the end of my driveway.

I'm not sure I'd get an EV without a 240V charger. Sure, you can charge it overnight out of a normal outlet, but sometimes you don't want to wait overnight. It just makes the car that much more usable for you. I want to say the price is likely to be a few thousand bucks to get it all installed and ready to go. The long term savings for that EV is balanced by one hell of a buy-in. And you'd better hope you don't need to do a lot of driving during an extended power outage if it's your only vehicle.

I like the idea of an EV as a second car, not really sold on one as a sole vehicle.

One reason I like the Volt over a pure EV is that if there is a power outage, or I need to drive somewhere before I can charge, I can just run it in gas mode, where it's still very efficient.

What I'm looking at with the 240v charger is how future proof it will be - will the one that works for the Volt today work for a Tesla in five years, or even the next-generation Volt?


I have to assume that there is an industry standard for plug designs. If there is ever going to be a nationwide infrastructure for charging electric cars, there needs to be. All gasoline pumps fit all gasoline tanks, after all. The manufacturers managed to conform to that.
 
2014-08-14 04:07:02 PM  
Honestly, it's an impressive car with very impressive technology.

Unfortunately, I doubt I'll ever own one.
 
2014-08-14 04:09:21 PM  
... I bought my Chevrolet Volt ... frantically jabbing at the Source London mobile app trying to find a functioning charging point, before - heaven forbid - I have to get out and walk...

media-cache-ec0.pinimg.com
 
2014-08-14 04:10:27 PM  

wildcardjack: Here's a thought about hybrids like Volt, which will operate on electric most of the time if you just use it as a neighborhood runabout most of the time: What if the engine won't run when you need it? If you don't use an engine regularly without storage prep gasoline goes stale, varnishes the line, fouls plugs, oil separates, water condenses, lifters go dry. So, that day you decide to drive out of town with your Volt, you get up to speed and it tries to go into gasoline mode, what does it do when the engine won't start?


On the Volt, the computer handles engine maintenance. Keeps track of how often it is used and will switch you off to engine if the gas is getting stale.
 
2014-08-14 04:12:47 PM  

wildcardjack: Here's a thought about hybrids like Volt, which will operate on electric most of the time if you just use it as a neighborhood runabout most of the time: What if the engine won't run when you need it? If you don't use an engine regularly without storage prep gasoline goes stale, varnishes the line, fouls plugs, oil separates, water condenses, lifters go dry. So, that day you decide to drive out of town with your Volt, you get up to speed and it tries to go into gasoline mode, what does it do when the engine won't start?


Not sure on the others, but the Volt will force the engine to run every so often to prevent that, even if you have a full battery charge.
 
2014-08-14 04:13:30 PM  

Joe USer: Not really, a hybrid's engine drives the wheels most of the time. The volt's motor drives the wheels, the engine powers the motor.


That would make it a series hybrid, however the Volt's gas engine can also supply power to the wheels mechanically. Wikipedia:

While in this series mode at higher speeds and loads, (typically above 30 miles per hour (48 km/h) at light to moderate loads) the gasoline engine can engage mechanically to the output from the transmission and assist both electric motors to drive the wheels, in which case the Volt operates as a power-split or series-parallel hybrid.
 
2014-08-14 04:15:17 PM  

akula: TuteTibiImperes: 

I like the idea of an EV as a second car, not really sold on one as a sole vehicle.


That's entirely dependent on your driving needs. Not to mention that if the concern is the one or two times a year you would exceed your normal range (in which an EV is practical), just rent a car.
 
2014-08-14 04:19:51 PM  

Johnsnownw: That's entirely dependent on your driving needs. Not to mention that if the concern is the one or two times a year you would exceed your normal range (in which an EV is practical), just rent a car.


My only problem with that is that I support remote sites that occasionally require me to drive to them without planning.

This alone prevents me from driving an EV, as the nearest site is 72 miles away. Annoying as it only happens a handful of times a year, but I can't be stuck with a car that can only go another 40 miles when I need to go out and do something. Kind of annoying, actually.
 
2014-08-14 04:24:23 PM  

Ivo Shandor: Joe USer: Not really, a hybrid's engine drives the wheels most of the time. The volt's motor drives the wheels, the engine powers the motor.

That would make it a series hybrid, however the Volt's gas engine can also supply power to the wheels mechanically. Wikipedia:

While in this series mode at higher speeds and loads, (typically above 30 miles per hour (48 km/h) at light to moderate loads) the gasoline engine can engage mechanically to the output from the transmission and assist both electric motors to drive the wheels, in which case the Volt operates as a power-split or series-parallel hybrid.


I came here to say this.

Also, that woman is a farking moran. There's plenty of electric vehicles with longer ranges and don't have guilty exhaust fumes of failure
 
2014-08-14 04:24:54 PM  

Ivo Shandor: Joe USer: Not really, a hybrid's engine drives the wheels most of the time. The volt's motor drives the wheels, the engine powers the motor.

That would make it a series hybrid, however the Volt's gas engine can also supply power to the wheels mechanically. Wikipedia:

While in this series mode at higher speeds and loads, (typically above 30 miles per hour (48 km/h) at light to moderate loads) the gasoline engine can engage mechanically to the output from the transmission and assist both electric motors to drive the wheels, in which case the Volt operates as a power-split or series-parallel hybrid.


So it's both series and power-split depending on mpg.
Cool, learned something new.
 
2014-08-14 04:26:53 PM  
 
2014-08-14 04:27:01 PM  
Wow, was that a poorly written, uninteresting article.
 
2014-08-14 04:27:32 PM  

skozlaw: Johnsnownw: That's entirely dependent on your driving needs. Not to mention that if the concern is the one or two times a year you would exceed your normal range (in which an EV is practical), just rent a car.

My only problem with that is that I support remote sites that occasionally require me to drive to them without planning.

This alone prevents me from driving an EV, as the nearest site is 72 miles away. Annoying as it only happens a handful of times a year, but I can't be stuck with a car that can only go another 40 miles when I need to go out and do something. Kind of annoying, actually.


That's why I'm a fan of the Volt. The electric range is decent and if I need to go farther, it turns into a normal car.
 
2014-08-14 04:29:30 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: brandent: Arkanaut: markie_farkie: If you own a Volt and can't figure out THAT IT RUNS ON GAS TOO and still manage to get stranded on the side of the road, you deserve to be summarily executed on the spot.

I don't own a Volt, but I thought it was marketed as a car that can run on electric 100% of the time, and gas is optional for "extending the range" or something like that.

Nope.  It isn't.  That would be the BMW i3 with a REX (range extender) you may be thinking about.  The Volt makes no such claim.

The Volt works basically the same way, it will run on pure electricity for up to x miles (generally 30-50 depending on how you drive) and then convert to gas mode.

If you drive less than the electric range most days you'll end up rarely using any gas.

It will force the engine on from time to time to circulate fluids and burn some gas so that it doesn't get too stale however.

I've been considering one, but I don't have a garage, and no outlet next to my driveway.  I need to get an estimate on having one of the 240volt chargers installed or at the least a 120volt outlet at the end of my driveway.


The Volt is not marketed as an 'electric car with range extender'.  Nor is it one nor does it function the same way.  It is marketed as a PHEV.  There are specific technical requireents for the former vs latter.  It effectively is about the ratio of electric miles to gas miles.  The BMW as an example has a gas tank that limits the gas range to be the same as the electric range or less.  That is what the classification is for.  And no it does not function the same.  They function it specific technically different where the i3 gas motor does not power the car but rather operates exclusively as a generator.
 
2014-08-14 04:31:13 PM  

Tobin_Lam: skozlaw: Johnsnownw: That's entirely dependent on your driving needs. Not to mention that if the concern is the one or two times a year you would exceed your normal range (in which an EV is practical), just rent a car.

My only problem with that is that I support remote sites that occasionally require me to drive to them without planning.

This alone prevents me from driving an EV, as the nearest site is 72 miles away. Annoying as it only happens a handful of times a year, but I can't be stuck with a car that can only go another 40 miles when I need to go out and do something. Kind of annoying, actually.

That's why I'm a fan of the Volt. The electric range is decent and if I need to go farther, it turns into a normal car.


Normal? With that dashboard?

j/k
 
2014-08-14 04:35:02 PM  

skozlaw: Johnsnownw: That's entirely dependent on your driving needs. Not to mention that if the concern is the one or two times a year you would exceed your normal range (in which an EV is practical), just rent a car.

My only problem with that is that I support remote sites that occasionally require me to drive to them without planning.

This alone prevents me from driving an EV, as the nearest site is 72 miles away. Annoying as it only happens a handful of times a year, but I can't be stuck with a car that can only go another 40 miles when I need to go out and do something. Kind of annoying, actually.


Check out the C-Max Energi, then. You can go about 20-ish miles in EV mode, then you have about 500 miles left in the tank. It's also nearly 200HP.

I had my father buy one because it was cheaper than the Volt, could seat 5, not 4, and had better reviews. The only real negative with the vehicle is storage space if you have passengers in the back. The way the numbers, just on financing, worked out it was cheaper for him to lease a C-Max Energi for 3 years, 12,000 miles per year, than purchase a Ford Focus Titanium (similar amenities) when factoring in the depreciation.
 
2014-08-14 04:43:34 PM  

brandent: TuteTibiImperes: brandent: Arkanaut: markie_farkie: If you own a Volt and can't figure out THAT IT RUNS ON GAS TOO and still manage to get stranded on the side of the road, you deserve to be summarily executed on the spot.

I don't own a Volt, but I thought it was marketed as a car that can run on electric 100% of the time, and gas is optional for "extending the range" or something like that.

Nope.  It isn't.  That would be the BMW i3 with a REX (range extender) you may be thinking about.  The Volt makes no such claim.

The Volt works basically the same way, it will run on pure electricity for up to x miles (generally 30-50 depending on how you drive) and then convert to gas mode.

If you drive less than the electric range most days you'll end up rarely using any gas.

It will force the engine on from time to time to circulate fluids and burn some gas so that it doesn't get too stale however.

I've been considering one, but I don't have a garage, and no outlet next to my driveway.  I need to get an estimate on having one of the 240volt chargers installed or at the least a 120volt outlet at the end of my driveway.

The Volt is not marketed as an 'electric car with range extender'.  Nor is it one nor does it function the same way.  It is marketed as a PHEV.  There are specific technical requireents for the former vs latter.  It effectively is about the ratio of electric miles to gas miles.  The BMW as an example has a gas tank that limits the gas range to be the same as the electric range or less.  That is what the classification is for.  And no it does not function the same.  They function it specific technically different where the i3 gas motor does not power the car but rather operates exclusively as a generator.


Fair enough, those differences are pretty minor though.  Whether or not the engine contributes towards powering the vehicle when running in gas mode or just acts as a generator doesn't really effect me as a driver - I can still run it x miles on electricity, and then indefinately on gas as long as I keep filling the tank.

It does qualify for the full $7,500 electric vehicle tax credit.
 
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