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(NYPost)   Mayor says do whatever the cops want, or they are right to kill you   (nypost.com) divider line 90
    More: Obvious, resisting arrest, Blasio  
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4422 clicks; posted to Politics » on 14 Aug 2014 at 2:23 PM (46 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-08-14 12:28:13 PM  
Dude in the back of the picture is not too impressed and the woman looks dead inside.
 
2014-08-14 12:41:24 PM  
I found a picture of the submitter.

img3.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2014-08-14 12:53:47 PM  
Mayor says do whatever the cops want, or they are right to kill you if you are black

Fixed.
 
2014-08-14 01:18:09 PM  
Yes, in much the same way that you shouldn't do anything to resist a mugger. The time to redress a wrong is after the situation is no longer likely to end in harm. Does anyone think that resisting an officer is going to end in the officer going "you know what? My bad, you're free to go?"
 
2014-08-14 01:40:49 PM  

nmrsnr: Yes, in much the same way that you shouldn't do anything to resist a mugger. The time to redress a wrong is after the situation is no longer likely to end in harm. Does anyone think that resisting an officer is going to end in the officer going "you know what? My bad, you're free to go?"


If you best him in fisticuffs he is obligated to let you free.
 
2014-08-14 01:55:56 PM  
thenypost.files.wordpress.com

image > adjustments > invert:

i19.photobucket.com
 
2014-08-14 02:28:01 PM  
You should comply with orders from a police officer, even illegal ones, at the time; because, you can always sue them later.

/ screaming about false arrest in the back of a cruiser does you no good
 
2014-08-14 02:28:25 PM  
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hMfJd7CKuSE
Watch this video (don't worry, the camera'll right itself) and tell me if that looks like wise behavior to you.
 
2014-08-14 02:28:26 PM  

nmrsnr: Yes, in much the same way that you shouldn't do anything to resist a mugger. The time to redress a wrong is after the situation is no longer likely to end in harm. Does anyone think that resisting an officer is going to end in the officer going "you know what? My bad, you're free to go?"


Apparently it ends in getting shot and killed even if you don't resist, which is how we got here in the first place. What would you advise doing?
 
2014-08-14 02:28:56 PM  
We see how well this kind of thinking is going over in Ferguson.
 
2014-08-14 02:33:27 PM  

CPennypacker: Apparently it ends in getting shot and killed even if you don't resist, which is how we got here in the first place. What would you advise doing?


Nowhere have I seen anyone say that Brown (which is what I assume you're referring to, even though this is De Blasio in NY) didn't resist. The claim is after he resisted, he was backing away and raising his arms, and then was shot repeatedly. But all the stories I've heard say he struggled with the cop when the cop tried to get him into the car.
 
2014-08-14 02:33:36 PM  

CPennypacker: nmrsnr: Yes, in much the same way that you shouldn't do anything to resist a mugger. The time to redress a wrong is after the situation is no longer likely to end in harm. Does anyone think that resisting an officer is going to end in the officer going "you know what? My bad, you're free to go?"

Apparently it ends in getting shot and killed even if you don't resist, which is how we got here in the first place. What would you advise doing?


being white.
 
2014-08-14 02:34:00 PM  
"estope Aran~a EstopE!!!"
 
2014-08-14 02:34:30 PM  

CPennypacker: nmrsnr: Yes, in much the same way that you shouldn't do anything to resist a mugger. The time to redress a wrong is after the situation is no longer likely to end in harm. Does anyone think that resisting an officer is going to end in the officer going "you know what? My bad, you're free to go?"

Apparently it ends in getting shot and killed even if you don't resist, which is how we got here in the first place. What would you advise doing?


Last I checked DeBlasio isn't mayor of STL, which I assume you're referring to, and which we still haven't gotten a clear story about. The context is a man in Staten Island was put in a chokehold because he resisted arrest, was pinned on the floor and died.
 
2014-08-14 02:36:24 PM  
When the guy with the pistol, pepper spray, handcuffs and taser tells you you're under arrest then you are well advised to be under arrest.
 
2014-08-14 02:40:54 PM  
the flag on your uniform blouse has a yellow fringe therefore you are an official of the naval court and I am not subject to Poseidon's laws
 
2014-08-14 02:45:08 PM  

CPennypacker: nmrsnr: Yes, in much the same way that you shouldn't do anything to resist a mugger. The time to redress a wrong is after the situation is no longer likely to end in harm. Does anyone think that resisting an officer is going to end in the officer going "you know what? My bad, you're free to go?"

Apparently it ends in getting shot and killed even if you don't resist, which is how we got here in the first place. What would you advise doing?


DeBlasio isn't referring to the Mike Brown case - he's referring to the Eric Garner incident in NYC, in which a man was resisting arrest, the arresting officer placed his arm around Garner's neck to restrain him, and Garner choked to death. (There's also a side issue with EMT supposedly taking too long to arrive, not sure what became of that.) Nobody got shot in this incident.
 
2014-08-14 02:45:56 PM  
"When a police officer comes to the decision that it's time to arrest someone, that individual is obligated to submit to arrest, strip search, cavity search, have their mugshot taken, along with fingerprints and DNA samples, and clock up a permanent black mark on background checks and fork out a fair bit of $$$ on legal fees and bail" the mayor said.They will then have every opportunity for due process in our court system. And if it turns out the Cop was just being an asshole... well, no harm done."
 
2014-08-14 02:48:02 PM  
The fun part is when you just do whatever the cop asks you to do, then they shout "stop resisting" (when you aren't) and start beating you.  They pulled that move on the reporters arrested last night.
 
2014-08-14 02:48:22 PM  

James!: nmrsnr: Yes, in much the same way that you shouldn't do anything to resist a mugger. The time to redress a wrong is after the situation is no longer likely to end in harm. Does anyone think that resisting an officer is going to end in the officer going "you know what? My bad, you're free to go?"

If you best him in fisticuffs he is obligated to let you free.


You also can invoke the Second Amendment, which allows - nay, obliges - citizens to prevent tyranny by the state by force of arms.
 
2014-08-14 02:48:32 PM  
Your weapon is not your fist at the time of the arrest. Your weapon is the lawyer you retain after you're booked.

Now, naturally, this sort of comment from DeBlasio is idiotically tone deaf because, even though he's technically right, nobody wants to hear that shiat after one of your officers killed a diabetic man because he was selling cigarettes in the wrong quantities.

So, in summary, you're not wrong, you're just an asshole.
 
2014-08-14 02:48:34 PM  
You're also entitled to a plunger handle up your ass when they put you in lockup.
 
2014-08-14 02:48:41 PM  
Same mindset as "Edward Snowed is a Traitor." Very common these days.

BTW, where are all the open-carry Cliven Bundy types facing down the police in the name of sovereignty and freedom?
 
2014-08-14 02:49:56 PM  
De Blasio has an interesting dilemma. On the one hand he thinks cops are tools of oppression, discriminate against minorities, and need to be reined in, and on the other hand he loves unions and their money. So now he has to tread the line between denouncing police actions he regards as oppressive and the cop unions who don't want their members' actions questioned.

As for submitting to an arrest, I'd be more supportive of that philosophy if cops were held responsible and subject to discipline for making unjustified or overly-aggressive arrests, but that seldom seems to happen. If a cop makes a bullshiat arrest they might later just set you free with no charges, but the cop involved never seems to lose his job, promotion, or pay as a result.
 
2014-08-14 02:50:29 PM  
And at that point not only do you have the right to remain silent, you should invoke the right as well.
 
2014-08-14 02:51:16 PM  

nmrsnr: CPennypacker: Apparently it ends in getting shot and killed even if you don't resist, which is how we got here in the first place. What would you advise doing?

Nowhere have I seen anyone say that Brown (which is what I assume you're referring to, even though this is De Blasio in NY) didn't resist. The claim is after he resisted, he was backing away and raising his arms, and then was shot repeatedly. But all the stories I've heard say he struggled with the cop when the cop tried to get him into the car.


Maybe the cop would have had less of a struggle had he bothered cuffing his suspect first.

Just a thought.

/out the pig, already
 
2014-08-14 02:52:01 PM  

Angela Lansbury's Merkin: The fun part is when you just do whatever the cop asks you to do, then they shout "stop resisting" (when you aren't) and start beating you.  They pulled that move on the reporters arrested last night.


Of course they'll move out of range of their patrol cars' dash cams so that they can be heard saying the magic words but not seen saying them to someone who isn't resisting.
 
2014-08-14 02:52:44 PM  
You'll have better odds of living if you don't resist, and/or if you are white.
 
2014-08-14 02:53:26 PM  

red5ish: When the guy with the pistol, pepper spray, handcuffs and taser tells you you're under arrest then you are well advised to be under arrest.


I dunno - it's easy to forget that fight-or-flight kicks in HARD when they put the bracelets on.

I had to BEG to have them call my then-gf, who was waiting for me to give her a ride home from the train station at 9pm (Glenmont isn't Beirut, but it's also not small town Middle America where no one locks their house or car) - if the cops hadn't agreed to the ONE request I made (after being very cooperative throughout the whole thing), I can very easily imagine that I'd flip out and have gotten shot/killed in response. To this day, I'm convinced the only reason he called her is that I mentioned she had a history of depression and was a survivor of sexual assault (fudging the truth, but only slightly) - I also somehow kept my composure enough to keep a civil and even tone.

Self-preservation should tell you to keep a lid on it until you can talk to a lawyer, but when you're unsure of when or how to even contact one, and stuck in a cell or the back of a squad car (and I can only imagine how people with claustrophobia or other psychological conditions feel) for who-knows-how-long, it's tough to act rationally.

// of course, it also doesn't help when the cops fark you over by, say, telling you to speak with the officer outside about calling a cab home at 2am, then not posting a cop out there
// leaving me to walk the 2 miles to a 7-11 alone, sans cell phone, since they made me leave it in the car, which went to impound, and without laces in my shoes (I started lacing them up in the station, lady cop goes "You can't do that here. Get outside.")
 
2014-08-14 02:54:03 PM  

TheGreatGazoo: And at that point not only do you have the right to remain silent, you should invoke the right as well.


"Tell me what I want to hear, Citizen. STOP RESISTING!!!" *punch* *kick* *taze*
 
2014-08-14 02:55:41 PM  

King Something: Angela Lansbury's Merkin: The fun part is when you just do whatever the cop asks you to do, then they shout "stop resisting" (when you aren't) and start beating you.  They pulled that move on the reporters arrested last night.

Of course they'll move out of range of their patrol cars' dash cams so that they can be heard saying the magic words but not seen saying them to someone who isn't resisting.


i.ytimg.com

Officer: Hey, I recognize you. You're that black guy I saw on TV.
Peter Griffin: Yeah, that's me.
Officer: [Into radio.] We have a stolen vehicle.
Peter Griffin: This is my...
Officer: [Into radio.] Subject getting beligerant.
Peter Griffin: I'm not...
Officer: [Into radio.] Officer down.
 
2014-08-14 03:02:32 PM  

Arkanaut: CPennypacker: nmrsnr: Yes, in much the same way that you shouldn't do anything to resist a mugger. The time to redress a wrong is after the situation is no longer likely to end in harm. Does anyone think that resisting an officer is going to end in the officer going "you know what? My bad, you're free to go?"

Apparently it ends in getting shot and killed even if you don't resist, which is how we got here in the first place. What would you advise doing?

DeBlasio isn't referring to the Mike Brown case - he's referring to the Eric Garner incident in NYC, in which a man was resisting arrest, the arresting officer placed his arm around Garner's neck to restrain him, and Garner choked to death. (There's also a side issue with EMT supposedly taking too long to arrive, not sure what became of that.) Nobody got shot in this incident.


The four EMTs have been suspended pending an internal investigation by the hospital.  The officer has been placed on desk duty.
 
GBB
2014-08-14 03:03:12 PM  

Angela Lansbury's Merkin: The fun part is when you just do whatever the cop asks you to do, then they shout "stop resisting" (when you aren't) and start beating you.  They pulled that move on the reporters arrested last night.


Of course they did.  Because reporters can always be trusted to report 100% of the truth, especially when they are the story and their goal is to get your sympathy and clicks.
 
2014-08-14 03:04:04 PM  
Just to be clear: I was referring to the Brown case to make a point about resisting, not because I thought he was the mayor in Missouri? or something. I'm not sure.

My point is in some cases (like if you have an excess of melanin) submitting doesn't really do much for you.
 
2014-08-14 03:05:01 PM  

CPennypacker: Just to be clear: I was referring to the Brown case to make a point about resisting, not because I thought he was the mayor in Missouri? or something. I'm not sure.

My point is in some cases (like if you have an excess of melanin) submitting doesn't really do much for you.


I wouldn't equate running away with submission
 
2014-08-14 03:05:18 PM  

AntiNerd: Same mindset as "Edward Snowed is a Traitor." Very common these days.

BTW, where are all the open-carry Cliven Bundy types facing down the police in the name of sovereignty and freedom?




Missouri Citizen Militia, who were at the Bundy Ranch, are also in Ferguson in support of the protesters, apparently.
 
2014-08-14 03:06:42 PM  

King Something: Of course they'll move out of range of their patrol cars' dash cams so that they can be heard saying the magic words but not seen saying them to someone who isn't resisting.


Even if it is recorded, they'll say you can't see it in the video but you tensed up so they couldn't handcuff you, that you planted your feet, stomped their shoes, pulled away, whatever.
 
2014-08-14 03:06:45 PM  
If you're found to be completely innocent of all charges, can you at least sue for the time/money lost from work by going to court and the time you spend in jail?
 
2014-08-14 03:09:00 PM  
It's an awful lot of power to give to guys who weren't smart enough or decent enough to get a real job.
 
2014-08-14 03:10:56 PM  

moothemagiccow: CPennypacker: Just to be clear: I was referring to the Brown case to make a point about resisting, not because I thought he was the mayor in Missouri? or something. I'm not sure.

My point is in some cases (like if you have an excess of melanin) submitting doesn't really do much for you.

I wouldn't equate running away with submission


Touche, but I also wouldn't equate gunning them down with arrest.
 
2014-08-14 03:13:54 PM  

The My Little Pony Killer: Maybe the cop would have had less of a struggle had he bothered cuffing his suspect first.

Just a thought.



No disagreement, but it's not the case that there was no resisting. This does not mean that what happened was right in any way whatsoever, just that in this case it's not that he was shot after putting up no resistance.
 
2014-08-14 03:15:02 PM  

RoxtarRyan: If you're found to be completely innocent of all charges, can you at least sue for the time/money lost from work by going to court and the time you spend in jail?


Not unless you can prove the cops knowingly falsely arrested you. Otherwise, they were Golden Boys just doing their jobs, and you must have done something to catch their attention, you scoundrel.
 
2014-08-14 03:16:28 PM  

RoxtarRyan: If you're found to be completely innocent of all charges, can you at least sue for the time/money lost from work by going to court and the time you spend in jail?


Only if you can prove malicious prosecution, wrongful imprisonment (that is, they arrested you even though they knew you were innocent), or some sort of egregious wrongdoing on the part of the police force. Otherwise the police would get sued after every not-guilty verdict.
 
2014-08-14 03:19:36 PM  

Dr Dreidel: Not unless you can prove the cops knowingly falsely arrested you. Otherwise, they were Golden Boys just doing their jobs, and you must have done something to catch their attention, you scoundrel.


It's not even that, but even people doing their job honestly sometimes make mistakes, or guilty people sometime go free for lack of evidence, having all those people be able to sue the police would quickly bankrupt any police force.

How much do you think the police should have to pay OJ for him being found not guilty?
 
2014-08-14 03:23:13 PM  

Arkanaut: James!: nmrsnr: Yes, in much the same way that you shouldn't do anything to resist a mugger. The time to redress a wrong is after the situation is no longer likely to end in harm. Does anyone think that resisting an officer is going to end in the officer going "you know what? My bad, you're free to go?"

If you best him in fisticuffs he is obligated to let you free.

You also can invoke the Second Amendment, which allows - nay, obliges - citizens to prevent tyranny by the state by force of arms.


Nice try. A little too obvious. No bites yet, but keep hoping.
 
2014-08-14 03:23:25 PM  

Angela Lansbury's Merkin: King Something: Of course they'll move out of range of their patrol cars' dash cams so that they can be heard saying the magic words but not seen saying them to someone who isn't resisting.

Even if it is recorded, they'll say you can't see it in the video but you tensed up so they couldn't handcuff you, that you planted your feet, stomped their shoes, pulled away, whatever.


I had a cop put his finger in my chest and try to push me back. All I did was hold my ground and not let that happen. I ended up getting my head slammed into the ground during the takedown, a knee in my back on the way down, and a fat cop with a taser screaming at me to stop resisting, which was funny because I was seeing stars at the time and was pretty disoriented from the whole head getting slammed into the pavement thing. Ended up being charged with possession I a controlled substance (adderall, which I had a prescription for, and which was somehow dropped when my case finally got to court), resisting arrest, and assaulting a police officer (a new charge tht only showed up when I went to court). All because I didn't let the cop push me around. farking bullies with badges, man, that's what most cops are.

/They knew the assault charge was bullshiat because I got offered six months of probation if I plead to simply resisting
//And my name was in the wrong order on the police report that the court had, which is funny because the one my lawyer got from the police the day after I was arrested had my name in the right order
///Wish I could have afforded to pay my lawyer to fight the charges and bring a lawsuit, but your options are limited when you're poor
 
2014-08-14 03:24:58 PM  

nmrsnr: The My Little Pony Killer: Maybe the cop would have had less of a struggle had he bothered cuffing his suspect first.

Just a thought.


No disagreement, but it's not the case that there was no resisting. This does not mean that what happened was right in any way whatsoever, just that in this case it's not that he was shot after putting up no resistance.


No shiat. I can read the thread, thanks.
 
2014-08-14 03:32:54 PM  

19 Kilo: AntiNerd: Same mindset as "Edward Snowed is a Traitor." Very common these days.

BTW, where are all the open-carry Cliven Bundy types facing down the police in the name of sovereignty and freedom?

Missouri Citizen Militia, who were at the Bundy Ranch, are also in Ferguson in support of the protesters, apparently.


Umm...no. They're "guarding" the fine upstanding white citizenry's businesses from the blah people.
 
2014-08-14 03:33:42 PM  

nmrsnr: Dr Dreidel: Not unless you can prove the cops knowingly falsely arrested you. Otherwise, they were Golden Boys just doing their jobs, and you must have done something to catch their attention, you scoundrel.

It's not even that, but even people doing their job honestly sometimes make mistakes, or guilty people sometime go free for lack of evidence, having all those people be able to sue the police would quickly bankrupt any police force.

How much do you think the police should have to pay OJ for him being found not guilty?


Sure - nobody's perfect, and mistakes get made.

When I make a mistake at work, I might have to reprint a page or make some more edits, maybe make a tester run a whole script again. When a cop makes a mistake, they can easily ruin someone's life. That's not to say cops get the death penalty for every bad ticket they write, but it is to say that with great power comes great responsibility.

Cops SHOULD be held to a higher standard than everyone else because of the importance of doing the job right (and consequences for doing it wrong), yet they're frequently held to a LOWER one because of the stress of their job.

// OP was largely snark, but once you're at the point of arresting/charging, there should be consequences (even minor ones, like simply keeping a public tally for each officer) for screwing up
 
2014-08-14 03:38:16 PM  

nmrsnr: RoxtarRyan: If you're found to be completely innocent of all charges, can you at least sue for the time/money lost from work by going to court and the time you spend in jail?

Only if you can prove malicious prosecution, wrongful imprisonment (that is, they arrested you even though they knew you were innocent), or some sort of egregious wrongdoing on the part of the police force. Otherwise the police would get sued after every not-guilty verdict.


There should be reparations available for citizens, though. You lost time, wages (for either time spent locked up or going to court), and your name tainted by plastered in the public blotter. Sucks that the only people who have protection from the police are the rich and politicians.
 
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