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(Vice)   Hospital food is about to get better. Thanks, Obama   (munchies.vice.com) divider line 41
    More: Cool, FoodService Director Magazine, Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, dietary habits, hospital gown, Outback Steakhouse  
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1685 clicks; posted to Politics » on 13 Aug 2014 at 8:40 PM (18 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-08-13 05:32:23 PM  
fta: But here's what's really going on. The ACA reduces Medicare reimbursement payments to hospitals with excess patient readmission rates (as determined by this formula). To help lower readmission rates, many major food service providers have committed to serving lighter food that isn't smothered in cream sauce, slathered in butter, or battered and fried; meals that would make a healthy person feel like complete shiat, too.

So serving healthier food leads to lower readmission rates which equals more Medicare reimbursement?

Sounds complicated but if it improves hospital food quality I'm for it.
 
2014-08-13 06:00:09 PM  
My mother spent a few days in a hospital about a month ago, and while there she ate better than I do at home.
 
2014-08-13 06:32:59 PM  

grumpfuff: My mother spent a few days in a hospital about a month ago, and while there she ate better than I do at home.


WTF kind of shiat do you eat at home? Or, WTF kind of hospital did your mom stay at?
 
2014-08-13 06:53:19 PM  
The hospital by my house (UCSD Medical Center) looks more like a hotel inside than an actual hospital. Which is good I guess?
 
2014-08-13 07:13:37 PM  

Barfmaker: grumpfuff: My mother spent a few days in a hospital about a month ago, and while there she ate better than I do at home.

WTF kind of shiat do you eat at home? Or, WTF kind of hospital did your mom stay at?


OR.
What kind of hospital do YOU go to where the food is crap?
Where I live the hospitals are in competition with each other, and the food is quite good.
They even take requests.
 
2014-08-13 07:39:13 PM  
I've never had hospital food as a patient, but the stuff in the cafeteria is usually pretty good. Although their standards of burgers and fries are hardly healthy.
 
2014-08-13 07:44:12 PM  
The food is great at the hospital where my wife is getting her treatment (Kaiser).  I was shocked at how big the room service menu was, and how cheap the food is in the cafeteria.  It won't win any awards, but it was better than most fast food places, and there were plenty of healthy options.
 
2014-08-13 07:44:41 PM  
In one study by FoodService Director Magazine, out of a sampling of 136 hospitals surveyed across the country, 40 percent said that Obamacare would impact their food service department, and 20 percent said Obamacare would greatly impact their food service (19 percent said it would have a minimal impact, and the rest said it would have no impact or weren't sure).


Impact, improve, you say potato, I say tomato, it's all good.
 
2014-08-13 07:51:21 PM  
If they just served some decent veggies I'd be happy.

/frequent flier so I'm getting a kick
 
2014-08-13 08:28:46 PM  

ginandbacon: If they just served some decent veggies I'd be happy.


I'm sure there are lots of long term coma patients that they serve, and many of them are decent people.

Happy yet?
 
2014-08-13 08:48:28 PM  
Great, so now people will be going to the emergency room for breakfast and the queues will be even longer.
 
2014-08-13 08:53:18 PM  
static2.fjcdn.com
 
2014-08-13 08:57:48 PM  
Just discharged from NMCSD (Naval Hospital SD) food not that bad some days it was really good or maybe I was hungry.

/broke my femur and trying to walk again
 
2014-08-13 08:58:06 PM  
Last time I was in the hospital the food was great. I've never really understood the hospital food thing.
 
2014-08-13 09:03:46 PM  

Dalrint: Last time I was in the hospital the food was great. I've never really understood the hospital food thing.


In the mid-80s, when visiting relatives in the hospital, the food was worse than what I was getting in my elementary school's lunchroom - and that shiat was federally mandated to not include any organic  molecules whatsoever.
 
2014-08-13 09:13:53 PM  
Those HCAHP (say "H-Cap") scores are driving  EVERYTHING in the hospital workplace right now - In some ways its a decent idea but it is horribly flawed in execution.

A) Full compensation rates are based on an "Always" answer to a serious of questions about the hospital experience of the patient, "Almost Always" being one possible answer right below.

Now, I don't know about everyone in the world but there are people like my father in law who has NEVER NEVER NEVER been 100% satisfied with anything, at any time and under any circumstances - he will never answer "Always" to any of those questions.  He feels that "Almost Always" represents a very satisfactory experience and would answer as such, even if the nursing staff killed 4 RN's waiting on him hand and foot 24 hours a day... and the hospital gets dinged in repayment.

B) Salaries are the #1 area for cost savings in a hospital - when HCAP scores are not bringing home the bacon the hospitals have responded by tightening the screws on hours/salary.  I have more than a couple of nurses in my immediate friends and family circle - they were given a "clock out of your shift on time OR ELSE" speech - no overtime, no extended shifts to do all the charting they couldnt do while running around all day and night.  So even though they already have too many patients they have to actively IGNORE them now in order to complete all the bookkeeping/charting that nursing work requires.  Surprise, surprise, their patients are not really inclined to answer "Always" when rating their nursing care.

C) The survey is mailed to you a week or so after your visit.  Pissed off people are still pissed off a week letter and are happy to downgrade every answer.  People who were happy and well cared for look at that survey and say "No one got time for dat...." and in the trash it goes.  Response rates are under 20%.... and this determines how much money the hospital gets in return.

Not a bad idea (shiatty service deserves shiatty compensation) but the current format is pants on head retarded.
 
2014-08-13 09:18:31 PM  
UCLA Ronald Reagan had a full menu with breakfast, lunch and dinner on it. It cost 15 bucks to get an extra plate for a visitor but there was little limit on what you could order other than whatever dietary restrictions you had. Ate pretty well there.
 
2014-08-13 09:20:10 PM  
I used to volunteer for studies lasting weekends or longer at the NIH's clinical center, and actually... The food was pretty darn good.
 
2014-08-13 09:21:27 PM  
After my appendectomy, the hospital gave me black forest cake. It was delicious. In the psychiatric ward, the food is nasty. They serve decaffeinated coffee with every meal and encourage you to drink it, even if you don't like coffee. CSB.
 
2014-08-13 09:36:15 PM  
Bathysphere:

After my appendectomy, the hospital gave me black forest cake. It was delicious. In the psychiatric ward, the food is nasty. They serve decaffeinated coffee with every meal and encourage you to drink it, even if you don't like coffee. CSB.

One of those weird little things you learn... After you have a spinal tap the first thing they tell you to do is go down to the coffee shop and chug the biggest, most caffinated coffee they have. Don't know if they were getting kickbacks from the coffee shop in the lobby, but it seemed to be common knowledge.
What the heck are you going to say to people who stick needles in your spine?
 
2014-08-13 10:10:15 PM  

maxheck: Bathysphere:

After my appendectomy, the hospital gave me black forest cake. It was delicious. In the psychiatric ward, the food is nasty. They serve decaffeinated coffee with every meal and encourage you to drink it, even if you don't like coffee. CSB.

One of those weird little things you learn... After you have a spinal tap the first thing they tell you to do is go down to the coffee shop and chug the biggest, most caffinated coffee they have. Don't know if they were getting kickbacks from the coffee shop in the lobby, but it seemed to be common knowledge.
What the heck are you going to say to people who stick needles in your spine?


Stop it?
 
2014-08-13 10:15:44 PM  

maxheck: Bathysphere:

After my appendectomy, the hospital gave me black forest cake. It was delicious. In the psychiatric ward, the food is nasty. They serve decaffeinated coffee with every meal and encourage you to drink it, even if you don't like coffee. CSB.

One of those weird little things you learn... After you have a spinal tap the first thing they tell you to do is go down to the coffee shop and chug the biggest, most caffinated coffee they have. Don't know if they were getting kickbacks from the coffee shop in the lobby, but it seemed to be common knowledge.
What the heck are you going to say to people who stick needles in your spine?


"Make sure to inject the good dope"?
 
2014-08-13 10:17:59 PM  
theinsultabot9000:

maxheck: Bathysphere:

After my appendectomy, the hospital gave me black forest cake. It was delicious. In the psychiatric ward, the food is nasty. They serve decaffeinated coffee with every meal and encourage you to drink it, even if you don't like coffee. CSB.

One of those weird little things you learn... After you have a spinal tap the first thing they tell you to do is go down to the coffee shop and chug the biggest, most caffinated coffee they have. Don't know if they were getting kickbacks from the coffee shop in the lobby, but it seemed to be common knowledge.
What the heck are you going to say to people who stick needles in your spine?

Stop it?


Good point. Other weird thing you learn is that when they do the spinal taps is they invite basically the hottest nurse of the opposite gender to "observe."

They don't do a darn thing, they're just there in the room to keep your mind occupied. Heard the same thing from female subjects, they got the hot guy nurses.

Also, pack sandals. Your back will be too farked up to bend over far enough to lace shoes.
 
2014-08-13 10:42:17 PM  

Fizpez: Response rates are under 20%


That right there should remove them from consideration entirely.
 
2014-08-13 11:12:59 PM  

Dictatorial_Flair: Fizpez: Response rates are under 20%

That right there should remove them from consideration entirely.


Should but won't.  This is the tip of the iceberg.  Forget about a 1-5 "How was your overall experience?" survey.  They're going to multipart 1-10 questions.  How was the wait time?  How was your ease in making an appointment? How was the temperature in the waiting room?  How was the nurse?  How was the thread count on the gowns?  How was your doctor?  How was traffic getting there?  10-10-10-10-10-9-10-10?  Too bad, you fell short of expectations, and that's why we're withholding payment.
 
2014-08-13 11:38:00 PM  

TommyymmoT: Barfmaker: grumpfuff: My mother spent a few days in a hospital about a month ago, and while there she ate better than I do at home.

WTF kind of shiat do you eat at home? Or, WTF kind of hospital did your mom stay at?

OR.
What kind of hospital do YOU go to where the food is crap?
Where I live the hospitals are in competition with each other, and the food is quite good.
They even take requests.


Here they've got delivery service to the rooms, with a full menu.  It's pretty good eats, too; at least at St Mary's.

One of the hospice care facilities, Agrace (may have spelled that wrong), has a cafeteria with ala carte food available to the public, and people that work in that part of town go there for lunch.
 
2014-08-14 01:27:33 AM  
I've only spent one night in the hospital and since I was having surgery on my digestive system my choice of dinner was between popsicles and jello.  I wasn't allowed to have real food.

Thankfully only one night and it was actually a very positive experience.
 
2014-08-14 02:47:12 AM  
Just spent another night and day in the hospital.  They put me one what they call a "clear liquid diet," which means a broth loaded with enough salt to give an elephant hypertension and a carton of water, high fructose corn syrup and "natural" flavors which they actually had the audacity to call "juice."  The concept of nutrition is completely foreign to hospitals.  If hospital food improves, it'll be a miracle and I'll say "Thanks, Obama" most sincerely.
 
2014-08-14 03:51:00 AM  

TwilightZone: Just spent another night and day in the hospital.  They put me one what they call a "clear liquid diet," which means a broth loaded with enough salt to give an elephant hypertension and a carton of water, high fructose corn syrup and "natural" flavors which they actually had the audacity to call "juice."  The concept of nutrition is completely foreign to hospitals.  If hospital food improves, it'll be a miracle and I'll say "Thanks, Obama" most sincerely.


Make sure you stir it up after awhile too. It...settles...

/Was in the hospital for a few weeks.
//Couldn't really eat their food, Had amino's or whatever pumped into my veins directly.
///Don't get well soon, get well now.
 
2014-08-14 04:48:03 AM  

quatchi: fta: But here's what's really going on. The ACA reduces Medicare reimbursement payments to hospitals with excess patient readmission rates (as determined by this formula). To help lower readmission rates, many major food service providers have committed to serving lighter food that isn't smothered in cream sauce, slathered in butter, or battered and fried; meals that would make a healthy person feel like complete shiat, too.

So serving healthier food leads to lower readmission rates which equals more Medicare reimbursement?

Sounds complicated but if it improves hospital food quality I'm for it.


You know, there are all kinds of foods that aren't these things and would taste delicious all the same. Food doesn't need to be slathered in cream/butter, fried or battered to be good.
 
2014-08-14 08:08:50 AM  
The hospital where my kids were born has some really good food.
 
2014-08-14 08:08:50 AM  

Splish: Dictatorial_Flair: Fizpez: Response rates are under 20%

That right there should remove them from consideration entirely.


Should but won't.  This is the tip of the iceberg.  Forget about a 1-5 "How was your overall experience?" survey.  They're going to multipart 1-10 questions.  How was the wait time?  How was your ease in making an appointment? How was the temperature in the waiting room?  How was the nurse?  How was the thread count on the gowns?  How was your doctor?  How was traffic getting there?  10-10-10-10-10-9-10-10?  Too bad, you fell short of expectations, and that's why we're withholding payment.


Readmission rates are a much bigger piece of the equation. If you go into the hospital for pneumonia, for example, and are released the next day and have to come back less than a week later? Well, maybe the hospital should have spent a little less time processing your insurance payment and a little more time making you well, which is part of why this is part of the law.

I work for a health care company that looks at the CMS data and specifically looks at how hospitals are doing. The thing to remember is that the hospital can't get extra reimbursement for doing a super bang-up job - they can only lose reimbursement money if they suck. The funny thing is, the state of our hospital care in this country is so poor, that simply doing their farking jobs will save tons of money for patients, make patients happy, and save lives.  Hospitals are finally being actually held accountable for doing the bare minimum to keep their patients from having to come back over and over...and of course, some people do have a problem with that...
 
2014-08-14 08:38:07 AM  

Fizpez: A) Full compensation rates are based on an "Always" answer to a serious of questions about the hospital experience of the patient, "Almost Always" being one possible answer right below.


Meh, when your dealing with tens of thousands of customers it all washes out in the end, though I'd imagine there are the few really expensive customers that you'd want to worry about because of this.
 
2014-08-14 08:59:36 AM  

Dr. Whoof: Splish: Dictatorial_Flair: Fizpez: Response rates are under 20%

That right there should remove them from consideration entirely.


Should but won't.  This is the tip of the iceberg.  Forget about a 1-5 "How was your overall experience?" survey.  They're going to multipart 1-10 questions.  How was the wait time?  How was your ease in making an appointment? How was the temperature in the waiting room?  How was the nurse?  How was the thread count on the gowns?  How was your doctor?  How was traffic getting there?  10-10-10-10-10-9-10-10?  Too bad, you fell short of expectations, and that's why we're withholding payment.

Readmission rates are a much bigger piece of the equation. If you go into the hospital for pneumonia, for example, and are released the next day and have to come back less than a week later? Well, maybe the hospital should have spent a little less time processing your insurance payment and a little more time making you well, which is part of why this is part of the law.

I work for a health care company that looks at the CMS data and specifically looks at how hospitals are doing. The thing to remember is that the hospital can't get extra reimbursement for doing a super bang-up job - they can only lose reimbursement money if they suck. The funny thing is, the state of our hospital care in this country is so poor, that simply doing their farking jobs will save tons of money for patients, make patients happy, and save lives.  Hospitals are finally being actually held accountable for doing the bare minimum to keep their patients from having to come back over and over...and of course, some people do have a problem with that...


In theory, it's a good theory. The problem is that the hospital's reimbursement is based on many things that are completely out of their control, like if the patient bothers to take his meds after being discharged. That's how a lot of patients end in the hospital in the first place. And while you mention hospitals doing more than the bare minimum, you know what insurers call that? Not medically necessary. Denied.
 
2014-08-14 09:22:36 AM  
Dead patients seldom return. So there's that.

Zombies?
 
2014-08-14 09:24:47 AM  
I always stay at Ronald McDonald House when I have to go to the hospital.  They still have the McDLT on the menu.
 
2014-08-14 09:31:58 AM  
Hospital food seems to have improved drastically already over the years.  I remember my grandmother being in during the 70s and 80s and they'd have 'mashed potatos' that were dished out with ice cream scoops.  Though my mom was in one about 10 years ago that didn't understand gluten allergies with her actual diagnosed Celiac disease.  "That's white bread so it doesn't have wheat in it".

Though she was in one last year where they were feeding her almost home cooked stuff.
 
2014-08-14 09:33:07 AM  
I spent a few weeks in a hospital and a few weeks in a SNF after being run over by a car.  The food at the hospital was good enough to be eatable, however the food at the SNF left something to be desired.  But in neither place was the food terribly unhealthy.   The hospital had lowered there costs and improved food quality by outsourcing its meal service to a third party that specialized in catering.

Having said that, the readmission rate has nothing to do with the hospital food; a patient can recover to full health on a feeding tube and an IV.    The readmission rate is more dependent upon the person's health when they leave the hospital, and whether that person has the capacity to recover.

The doctors responsible for a patient's health want to see that patient recover, and to the hospital, the patient is a "billable" for as long as insurance/Medicaid/Mediare approves.  But, in general, insurance/Medicaid/Medicare has force hospitals to discharge patients once they were no longer critical, but prior to being fully recovered.  However with ACA, hospitals are allowed to hold patients longer prior to discharge.  I'd imagine that you will start to see more folks going to SNF's as they are much more cheaper than a hospital.
 
2014-08-14 09:41:04 AM  

TwilightZone: Just spent another night and day in the hospital.  They put me one what they call a "clear liquid diet," which means a broth loaded with enough salt to give an elephant hypertension and a carton of water, high fructose corn syrup and "natural" flavors which they actually had the audacity to call "juice."  The concept of nutrition is completely foreign to hospitals.  If hospital food improves, it'll be a miracle and I'll say "Thanks, Obama" most sincerely.


If hospital food truly improves, so will their outcomes.

Removing fatty items because of he persistent, yet unfounded, phobia we somehow still have will not help.
Decent vegetables that aren't boiled in asswater, meat that wasn't mechanically separated and re-formed, fresh fruit, and whole fats like real butter and olive oil would be a good start.
The hospital where we had our crotchfruit had a great cafeteria as far as choices, but it was nearly all institutional "healthy" food, a sandwich bar, soups, and nearly any kind of junk food imaginable.
Breakfast was great, though. All you can eat bacon, which was brought up to the newborn/maternity area every morning.
 
2014-08-14 10:58:15 AM  
Oh great, fifty dollars for tater tots.
 
2014-08-14 11:36:51 AM  

El Dudereno: TwilightZone: Just spent another night and day in the hospital.  They put me one what they call a "clear liquid diet," which means a broth loaded with enough salt to give an elephant hypertension and a carton of water, high fructose corn syrup and "natural" flavors which they actually had the audacity to call "juice."  The concept of nutrition is completely foreign to hospitals.  If hospital food improves, it'll be a miracle and I'll say "Thanks, Obama" most sincerely.

If hospital food truly improves, so will their outcomes.

Removing fatty items because of he persistent, yet unfounded, phobia we somehow still have will not help.
Decent vegetables that aren't boiled in asswater, meat that wasn't mechanically separated and re-formed, fresh fruit, and whole fats like real butter and olive oil would be a good start.



You're absolutely right.  I'd add remove all added sugar and fake sugars to the list.
 
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