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(HypeAngel)   How robots will be taking all our jobs soon. Yes, even yours   (hypeangel.com) divider line 55
    More: Scary, CGP Grey, robots  
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2096 clicks; posted to Video » on 13 Aug 2014 at 2:56 PM (29 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



55 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-08-13 01:07:18 PM  
This is what I have been trying to tell people for years.  Only when it becomes blatantly obvious will people start to concede.  I don't think it could get up to 45% but I feel that a 16-20% permanent unemployment would not be unreasonable.
 
2014-08-13 02:01:03 PM  
I had a great job as a Time Traveling Assassin, and some stupid robot came along and replaced me.  I mean this guy couldn't even find the right Sarah Connor!  Killing three women before finding the right one!  I never did that when I was sent back!
 
2014-08-13 02:55:12 PM  
When a robot is capable of doing my carpentry job for a quarter of my cost I'll buy 4 robots to do my job and oversee them and call it "martissimo's high end robot carpentry", until then I'll just keep collecting my 40 bucks an hour + pension and sweating all day

So I say bring the damm robots on already!
 
2014-08-13 03:01:10 PM  
That's pretty scary considering I program robots.

/not really
 
2014-08-13 03:01:31 PM  
Good thing I have Old Glory Insurance.
 
2014-08-13 03:06:07 PM  
We've been hearing this since the 60's
 
2014-08-13 03:12:04 PM  
eventually robots will be able to do your job

no wai, my job requires creativity the robot won't be able to do it

If you think you're safe because your job requires a certain degree of creativity -- think again.

uh oh, you've got me worried with your assertion, but what's your evidence?

The Baxter Robot Folding a Shirt:

wow,  if a robot can fold a shirt what can't a robot do! (hey robots that was sarcasm)
 
2014-08-13 03:15:35 PM  
Wait you are telling me that technological innovation drives changes in economic structure?

I just assumed we were all still farmers.
 
2014-08-13 03:15:54 PM  
When robots can do my job, we will have more to worry about than jobs.
 
2014-08-13 03:16:32 PM  

Zasteva: That's pretty scary considering I program robots.

/not really


oops ..I see my comment has been covered
 
2014-08-13 03:27:07 PM  
Still no sex-bots?
/sigh
 
2014-08-13 03:34:24 PM  

Perlin Noise: Zasteva: That's pretty scary considering I program robots.

/not really

oops ..I see my comment has been covered


Probably by a robot.
 
2014-08-13 03:46:35 PM  
If that narrator was a human then he was trying very hard to sound like a bot.
 
2014-08-13 03:59:36 PM  
Yeah, no.

I teach Theater and Entertainment Design and Production.

I use more robots than before, but replace me?   Nope.

Creativity cannot be programmed.
 
2014-08-13 04:03:21 PM  

Crewmannumber6: We've been hearing this since the 60's


Technology's been advancing since the 60's.
As the cost of labor goes up and the price of technology goes down, more jobs become automated.

/Which is why I'm lining up a gig fixing robots.
 
2014-08-13 04:27:03 PM  
The problem is not the automation, it is the gap in wealth and security between rich and poor. Someone still needs to own all of these robots that produce goods and services. As they become available the rich will use them to get richer and the poor will be farked. The problem is just sped up and exacerbated by technology.
 
2014-08-13 04:28:27 PM  

Makh: This is what I have been trying to tell people for years.  Only when it becomes blatantly obvious will people start to concede.  I don't think it could get up to 45% but I feel that a 16-20% permanent unemployment would not be unreasonable.


That's what they said when the printing press and the automated loom were invented.
 
2014-08-13 04:29:15 PM  

Crewmannumber6: We've been hearing this since the 60's


The 1660s, that is.
 
2014-08-13 04:33:36 PM  
My job is basically installing and repairing robots, for a company that manufactures robots... I'm safe for the short haul.
 
2014-08-13 04:42:43 PM  

martissimo: When a robot is capable of doing my carpentry job for a quarter of my cost I'll buy 4 robots to do my job and oversee them and call it "martissimo's high end robot carpentry", until then I'll just keep collecting my 40 bucks an hour + pension and sweating all day.


And the average house size will soar to 5000 square feet, as the cost to build them will shrink.

People don't understand. 200 years ago, 90% of Americans were employed in the food growing/processing/distributing industry. Now, thanks to industrial farm equipment (and refrigeration) it's 5%. Yet, we don't have 85% unemployment and our standard of living has increased astronomically, because the efficiency freed up money for other purposes.

The US went from being a poor country full of semi-literate pig farmers to the richest country on the planet in only 100 years because the industrial revolution took off here faster than in Europe, thanks to laissez faire government and a lack of a guild system.

Before the assembly line, cars cost more than the average worker made in 10 years... they were the Lear Jets of the late 19th century. Now everybody has one.

Books used to be so expensive that even the rich couldn't afford them; they were owned by governments or the Catholic church.

Automation has always, and will always, create a higher standard of living for everybody and more jobs. What's killing our economy is that China is automating much faster than we are.
 
2014-08-13 05:11:58 PM  

DrPainMD: What's killing our economy is that China is automating much faster than we are.


Well, that and Americans won't sit on an overturned bucket and wind iPod charger transformers for 17 hours a day at $0.35/hr.
 
2014-08-13 05:23:13 PM  

Terminal Accessory: Yeah, no.

I teach Theater and Entertainment Design and Production.

I use more robots than before, but replace me?   Nope.

Creativity cannot be programmed.


You are already replaced, you just don't know it.
 
2014-08-13 05:36:51 PM  

mrlewish: Terminal Accessory: Yeah, no.

I teach Theater and Entertainment Design and Production.

I use more robots than before, but replace me?   Nope.

Creativity cannot be programmed.

You are already replaced, you just don't know it.


Yeah, again no.

Wishful thinking there.
 
2014-08-13 05:38:12 PM  
Basically we've got to either start preparing for a post scarcity economy where everyone can thrive without employment, or we've got to try as hard as we can to hold onto out current scarcity based economy and prepare against the uprisings and civil unrest that will come from massive segments of the population not only being unemployed but unemployable.

Which one are we doing? Look at the rise of gated communities and the militarization of the police force and you tell me which route we've decided to go.
 
2014-08-13 05:47:58 PM  

Terminal Accessory: Yeah, no.

I teach Theater and Entertainment Design and Production.

I use more robots than before, but replace me?   Nope.

Creativity cannot be programmed.


While that is true, the Entertainment Industry has lost a lot of jobs due to automation.  Automated rigging, lighting, staging have all had a major impact on industry jobs.  I regularly do shows with less than 1/4 the crew I had 20 years ago, and faster.

It only takes one person to run an automated show control system, 20 years ago it would have taken 10 stagehands and a half dozen guys on the rail to do what one button does today.  Focus lights?  It used to be 4 in the air and 4 on the ground (if you were lucky), today it takes 1 programmer.  12 carpenters for 2 weeks to build the set? Not anymore, just throw up some flats and use a media server for a digital set.  It will still look fine to an audience.

Creativity cannot be programmed, and I hope you are teaching your students more theory and technical implementation than stagecraft.  Sadly it is a dying art.
 
2014-08-13 05:57:07 PM  

Lighting: Terminal Accessory: Yeah, no.

I teach Theater and Entertainment Design and Production.

I use more robots than before, but replace me?   Nope.

Creativity cannot be programmed.

While that is true, the Entertainment Industry has lost a lot of jobs due to automation.  Automated rigging, lighting, staging have all had a major impact on industry jobs.  I regularly do shows with less than 1/4 the crew I had 20 years ago, and faster.

It only takes one person to run an automated show control system, 20 years ago it would have taken 10 stagehands and a half dozen guys on the rail to do what one button does today.  Focus lights?  It used to be 4 in the air and 4 on the ground (if you were lucky), today it takes 1 programmer.  12 carpenters for 2 weeks to build the set? Not anymore, just throw up some flats and use a media server for a digital set.  It will still look fine to an audience.

Creativity cannot be programmed, and I hope you are teaching your students more theory and technical implementation than stagecraft.  Sadly it is a dying art.


Like most industries it is paring out the unskilled labor.

I need less stage hands, but still need good programmers. I have less workers, but the ones I still have need to be smarter.

I am training my students to the creative person at the top, not the soon to be unemployed crew at the bottom.

Not everything can be virtually projected, but I expect 3D printing to take out even more carpenter jobs moving forward.
 
2014-08-13 06:03:53 PM  
 
2014-08-13 06:08:53 PM  

Terminal Accessory: Yeah, no.

I teach Theater and Entertainment Design and Production.

I use more robots than before, but replace me?   Nope.

Creativity cannot be programmed.


img.fark.net
 
kab
2014-08-13 06:23:27 PM  
Good.  The sooner the majority of society can have a great life without having to wage slave themselves for most of their existence, the better.
 
kab
2014-08-13 06:27:09 PM  

Terminal Accessory: I am training my students to the creative person at the top, not the soon to be unemployed crew at the bottom.


So you're lying to them, basically.
 
2014-08-13 06:27:32 PM  

Terminal Accessory: Lighting: Terminal Accessory:

Like most industries it is paring out the unskilled labor.


Wow.  It is very sad you have that attitude.  I feel bad for your students.

Good stagehands, carpenters, and riggers had to be incredibly skilled, more so in the past than now that robots are taking their positions.  They are highly skilled professionals that are still being replaced by automation. It took a lot more skill in a crew to create a show pre-automation than it does now.

I need less stage hands, but still need good programmers. I have less workers, but the ones I still have need to be smarter.

Yeah, no. "Plug it in and, if it does not work swap it out" is not smarter.  I occasionally teach automation programming.  I can make a programmer out of almost anyone in a week.

I am training my students to the creative person at the top

I look forward to the competition, but given your opinion of your peers in the industry, those who have made theatrical entertainment what it is today, I am not going to be losing any sleep.

/make sure your students know how to load a truck.  Nobody starts at the top
 
2014-08-13 06:38:30 PM  
Wait until "unemployable though no fault of their own" meets "got mine, screw you".
 
2014-08-13 06:49:18 PM  
Automated checkout "cashiers" are the most worthless piles of shiat I have ever seen. Never had one work correctly yet. In a grocery store, you can't get produce weighted in correctly and there is inevitably SOME sale item showing up as $1 or more higher than it should be... so, you wind up stuck waiting for the one idiot that oversees 10 machines to finally wake up and come try and figure out wtf it did now.
Same thing in a hardware setting where the produce factor is removed from the equation..  1st item, scan, rings up, put in bag.... next.. next.. please ring up item...  that was it. PLEASE RING UP ITEM.  tHERE IS NO ITEM.. AND BACK TO WAITING Then they did out all your crap and look it all over.
The hardware stores is what royally pisses me off... not a single lane open; just the auto-cashiers and they've never properly worked once.

/one old guy came up to the one in the hardware store and just told the woman to go ahead and take his "shiat" and ring it up, the machine wouldn;t ring it up right and she'd be un-bagging it all like some biatch anyhow... loud enough you could hear him all over store.
 
2014-08-13 06:57:03 PM  

TheMega: Automated checkout "cashiers" are the most worthless piles of shiat I have ever seen. Never had one work correctly yet. In a grocery store, you can't get produce weighted in correctly and there is inevitably SOME sale item showing up as $1 or more higher than it should be... so, you wind up stuck waiting for the one idiot that oversees 10 machines to finally wake up and come try and figure out wtf it did now.
Same thing in a hardware setting where the produce factor is removed from the equation..  1st item, scan, rings up, put in bag.... next.. next.. please ring up item...  that was it. PLEASE RING UP ITEM.  tHERE IS NO ITEM.. AND BACK TO WAITING Then they did out all your crap and look it all over.
The hardware stores is what royally pisses me off... not a single lane open; just the auto-cashiers and they've never properly worked once.

/one old guy came up to the one in the hardware store and just told the woman to go ahead and take his "shiat" and ring it up, the machine wouldn;t ring it up right and she'd be un-bagging it all like some biatch anyhow... loud enough you could hear him all over store.


Regardless, they will become the norm because they are cheaper.

Full service gas was nice too ...
 
2014-08-13 07:37:47 PM  

Prophet of Loss: Regardless, they will become the norm because they are cheaper.

Full service gas was nice too ...


They have actually removed them all from all the Albertsons stores near me recently for some reason, I would support the move and shop there more since it means more workers having a decent job, but their meat sucks compared to the Smith's they compete with here.

I like a nice prime ribeye just marbled like mad compared to that choice stuff that is garbage in comparison!
 
2014-08-13 09:55:26 PM  
I can see a demand for in home holographic reproduction of stage productions and musicals.  We already have TuPac back from the dead.  It would be amazing to pick out specific performers from various productions. Like a Colm Wilkinson as Valjean and a Russell Crowe Javert for Les Miserables.  And you could have the rebels be the rebels from Star Wars and the French soldiers can be storm troopers.  You could have a Patrick Stewart Macbeth set on the bridge of the Enterprise.  The performing arts can be automated easily with 100% of its current quality and a tremendous increase in marketability.
 
2014-08-13 10:31:38 PM  
I'll never forget you, Bender...MEMORY DELETED
 
2014-08-13 10:59:34 PM  
rr-web.s3.amazonaws.com

Repetitive manual labor robot that's already available.

The monitor face "looks" at what it's going to do next and what it's working on, the exact same way as humans.
 
2014-08-13 11:40:31 PM  
I often thought about a doing a side project of a feeding a given subject's spoken words into a neural net AI to produce a "virtual impression" of that person.

If I can make a computer program that sounds just like a voice actor then why hire the actual actor?
 
2014-08-13 11:41:34 PM  
boingboing.net
 
2014-08-14 12:22:20 AM  

Spectrum: If that narrator was a human then he was trying very hard to sound like a bot.


Yea, what's up with that "voice"?  I hear that affect a lot in these mini-documentaries, or whatever you want to call them.  they seem to be a modern equivalent to the old school radio voice, i.e. Carl Castle.  Some kind of post-pubescent, hipsterish, "I'm saying something important" voice.  Fast cadence, emotionally detached, high pitched.  I'm less inclined to listen and more inclined to swing.  What's up with that?
 
2014-08-14 12:24:55 AM  
Also, jokes on them!  With my hypertension and rampant alcoholism, I'll be dead inside of a decade so bring it on robot apocalypse!  The more you drag down with me the better the conversation on the ride!
 
2014-08-14 04:13:59 AM  

burninbeaver: [boingboing.net image 400x225]


all the humans are dead....
 
2014-08-14 06:29:34 AM  
Unlikely. I haven't done much in a decade.
 
2014-08-14 07:25:29 AM  
I've been saying this for years, especially anyone in the transportation industry.  If I was a taxi driver and saw the google car, I'd shiat my pants and start going back to school.  There's a reason why there's 300,000 un-filled truck driver jobs in this country, nobody is dumb enough to invest $5k into a low paying job that's going to be obsolete in 5-10 years.  If a self-driving semi can work around the clock to deliver goods, why would any company hire a human being to do so?  Especially with the risk if they crash.  Not only the goods in the trailer, the $200k truck itself, anyone they might hit (like a comedian that sues them).

As an engineer, I feel my job is safe for at least another 20 years.  I can imagine a time where a robot looks at how a product works, sees where things could improve, and start modeling new parts in CAD within hours, and then sends those models to a 3d printer, and another robot picks up those parts and starts assembling them, and another robot takes that product and starts testing it.

Also, they took our jerbs!
static1.gamespot.com
 
2014-08-14 09:55:31 AM  

TheMega: Automated checkout "cashiers" are the most worthless piles of shiat I have ever seen. Never had one work correctly yet. In a grocery store, you can't get produce weighted in correctly and there is inevitably SOME sale item showing up as $1 or more higher than it should be... so, you wind up stuck waiting for the one idiot that oversees 10 machines to finally wake up and come try and figure out wtf it did now.
Same thing in a hardware setting where the produce factor is removed from the equation..  1st item, scan, rings up, put in bag.... next.. next.. please ring up item...  that was it. PLEASE RING UP ITEM.  tHERE IS NO ITEM.. AND BACK TO WAITING Then they did out all your crap and look it all over.
The hardware stores is what royally pisses me off... not a single lane open; just the auto-cashiers and they've never properly worked once.

/one old guy came up to the one in the hardware store and just told the woman to go ahead and take his "shiat" and ring it up, the machine wouldn;t ring it up right and she'd be un-bagging it all like some biatch anyhow... loud enough you could hear him all over store.


Really? I know but this is fark and all, but not even a single machine you've used has ever worked right?  Please.
 
2014-08-14 10:33:00 AM  
I program, repair, and troubleshoot automation and robots, so bring em on.
 
2014-08-14 10:51:21 AM  

Lighting: I can make a programmer out of almost anyone in a week.


You and I have a different definition of programmer, methinks.  Given how many folks I've seen with CS degrees that barely know what a variable is never fails to amaze me--and those folks will never be programmers.

/ no CS degree here
// note that "how many folks I've seen" does not mean "most" or even "more than 10%" but rather "holy crap, that's the third one this decade!"
 
2014-08-14 05:20:01 PM  

AntonChigger: TheMega: Automated checkout "cashiers" are the most worthless piles of shiat I have ever seen. Never had one work correctly yet. In a grocery store, you can't get produce weighted in correctly and there is inevitably SOME sale item showing up as $1 or more higher than it should be... so, you wind up stuck waiting for the one idiot that oversees 10 machines to finally wake up and come try and figure out wtf it did now.
Same thing in a hardware setting where the produce factor is removed from the equation..  1st item, scan, rings up, put in bag.... next.. next.. please ring up item...  that was it. PLEASE RING UP ITEM.  tHERE IS NO ITEM.. AND BACK TO WAITING Then they did out all your crap and look it all over.
The hardware stores is what royally pisses me off... not a single lane open; just the auto-cashiers and they've never properly worked once.

/one old guy came up to the one in the hardware store and just told the woman to go ahead and take his "shiat" and ring it up, the machine wouldn;t ring it up right and she'd be un-bagging it all like some biatch anyhow... loud enough you could hear him all over store.

Really? I know but this is fark and all, but not even a single machine you've used has ever worked right?  Please.


After years of tech support I have come to acknowledge that some people are the descendants of an ancient blood line of Gremlins, this chap appears to be one of them.
 
2014-08-14 06:51:11 PM  
When computer intelligence equals that of the human, it is game over for having any  'job', skilled or unskilled.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-28688781

How soon before we dedicate ourselves to working out the precise phrase not to be killed by an all powerful God. What would happen if you could pray and it could come true, but you have to be really pedantic or chuckle you get what you really wish for...
 
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