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(Medium)   WWII Japanese mass breakout from Australian POW camp makes The Great Escape look kinda "meh"   (medium.com ) divider line
    More: Interesting, Japan Ground Self-Defense Force, WWII, Japanese, Japan Self-Defense Forces, Australian prisons, Australian Air Force, prisoner of war camps, Geneva Conventions  
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7141 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Aug 2014 at 8:57 PM (1 year ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-08-12 05:54:44 PM  
Interesting read. Thanks, subby.
 
2014-08-12 06:06:02 PM  
In the end, perhaps we've neglected the Cowra Breakout because people have chosen to ignore it.

Or perhaps it's because it happened in an underpopulated, isolated country that doesn't make huge waves on the international political scene, doesn't make hugely successful movies, the camp was run by the winners, and who the Fark knew the Aussies even HAD camps for the Axis captured anyway?
 
2014-08-12 06:06:10 PM  
Escaping in a country where every living thing wants to kill you is sheer folly.

I can't wait until the movie comes out.

/Watch for the drop bears.
 
2014-08-12 06:14:37 PM  
Approves

img.fark.net

/obscure?
//my screengrab, you can't GIS this one biatches
///slashies for courage
 
2014-08-12 06:38:54 PM  
FTA: "Nearly a thousand screaming Japanese prisoners, armed with baseball bats..."

Who would let prisoners have baseball bats?
 
2014-08-12 06:45:53 PM  

InterruptingQuirk: Approves

[img.fark.net image 652x368]

/obscure?
//my screengrab, you can't GIS this one biatches
///slashies for courage


Challenge accepted.

i60.tinypic.com
 
2014-08-12 06:46:09 PM  

rkiller1: FTA: "Nearly a thousand screaming Japanese prisoners, armed with baseball bats..."

Who would let prisoners have baseball bats?


It was the fight off the native fauna. Aussies aren't monsters.
 
2014-08-12 06:57:39 PM  

rkiller1: FTA: "Nearly a thousand screaming Japanese prisoners, armed with baseball bats..."

Who would let prisoners have baseball bats?


Yeah, that seems especially foolish considering they seemed to know the escape attempt was coming.
 
2014-08-12 06:59:08 PM  
Shown here is a former prisoner who made his way to an island he thought was deserted.

img.photobucket.com
 
2014-08-12 07:00:17 PM  

fusillade762: Challenge accepted.

i60.tinypic.com


Holy Shiat! That is insane. What kind of crazy Russian internet magic have they got?


img.fark.net
 
2014-08-12 07:09:34 PM  

fusillade762: rkiller1: FTA: "Nearly a thousand screaming Japanese prisoners, armed with baseball bats..."

Who would let prisoners have baseball bats?

Yeah, that seems especially foolish considering they seemed to know the escape attempt was coming.


That would take a lot of balls.
 
2014-08-12 09:01:40 PM  
And it all pales in comparison of Franz von Werra, who managed to escape from Canada, cross (then Neutral) America, make it to Brazil, and from there back to Spain, Italy, and Germany!
 
2014-08-12 09:01:45 PM  

thisisyourbrainonFark: Shown here is a former prisoner who made his way to an island he thought was deserted.

[img.photobucket.com image 360x240]


Don't be silly. That's the slanty eyed slope from Bugs Bunny! It's a cartoon!
 
2014-08-12 09:08:02 PM  
Well they had a long enough time to plan it out.
 
2014-08-12 09:08:42 PM  
In the end, perhaps we've neglected the Cowra Breakout because people have chosen to ignore it.

Or more likely because it was entirely pointless and all the prisoners who escaped were killed or recaptured in short order.

When Allied prisoners escaped camps they could at least hope they'd run into sympathetic civilians who'd help get them out of the country, what were WW2 Japanese soldiers in the middle of Australia gonna do, trek a thousand miles across a desert filled with things that wanted to kill them and then swim an ocean?
 
2014-08-12 09:09:57 PM  
No it doesn't, a horde of armed prisoners overwhelming a significantly smaller force is not near as cool as digging a secret tunnel mad then jumping a fence on a motorcycle.

/plus the Japanese are the bad guys
 
2014-08-12 09:12:06 PM  
no way to blend in with the local populace
 
2014-08-12 09:16:14 PM  
That'll happen when you don't beat, starve and murder your prisoners.
 
2014-08-12 09:20:08 PM  

Gunther: In the end, perhaps we've neglected the Cowra Breakout because people have chosen to ignore it.

Or more likely because it was entirely pointless and all the prisoners who escaped were killed or recaptured in short order.

When Allied prisoners escaped camps they could at least hope they'd run into sympathetic civilians who'd help get them out of the country, what were WW2 Japanese soldiers in the middle of Australia gonna do, trek a thousand miles across a desert filled with things that wanted to kill them and then swim an ocean?


Or even more likely there was no propaganda value in a story where the enemy couldn't be portrayed as pure evil.

Even now, this long later, it's nearly impossible for the WWII-era Japanese or Germans to be portrayed as anything other than universally evil, hateful people who spend all their time scowling, shouting, goosestepping, and crashing their planes into things.

The victor doesn't just get the spoils -- they also write the history books, and they almost always minimize their own shameful behavior while playing up that of the other side.

The truth of war is that evil people are everywhere, good people are everywhere, and both end up doing evil -- no matter what their reason.
 
2014-08-12 09:22:04 PM  
Congratulations. Now you're in AUSTRALIA.
 
2014-08-12 09:22:14 PM  

gweilo8888: Gunther: In the end, perhaps we've neglected the Cowra Breakout because people have chosen to ignore it.

Or more likely because it was entirely pointless and all the prisoners who escaped were killed or recaptured in short order.

When Allied prisoners escaped camps they could at least hope they'd run into sympathetic civilians who'd help get them out of the country, what were WW2 Japanese soldiers in the middle of Australia gonna do, trek a thousand miles across a desert filled with things that wanted to kill them and then swim an ocean?

Or even more likely there was no propaganda value in a story where the enemy couldn't be portrayed as pure evil.

Even now, this long later, it's nearly impossible for the WWII-era Japanese or Germans to be portrayed as anything other than universally evil, hateful people who spend all their time scowling, shouting, goosestepping, and crashing their planes into things.

The victor doesn't just get the spoils -- they also write the history books, and they almost always minimize their own shameful behavior while playing up that of the other side.

The truth of war is that evil people are everywhere, good people are everywhere, and both end up doing evil -- no matter what their reason.


Soooooo....

All sides are bad, choose Nazi?
 
2014-08-12 09:22:57 PM  
Great read, nice score Subby.  The Japanese military mind set back then could have been a template for the Borg, such a mindless lockstep of conformity that ultimately cost them as many soldiers as the actual fighting did.
 
2014-08-12 09:25:27 PM  

gweilo8888: Gunther: In the end, perhaps we've neglected the Cowra Breakout because people have chosen to ignore it.

Or more likely because it was entirely pointless and all the prisoners who escaped were killed or recaptured in short order.

When Allied prisoners escaped camps they could at least hope they'd run into sympathetic civilians who'd help get them out of the country, what were WW2 Japanese soldiers in the middle of Australia gonna do, trek a thousand miles across a desert filled with things that wanted to kill them and then swim an ocean?

Or even more likely there was no propaganda value in a story where the enemy couldn't be portrayed as pure evil.

Even now, this long later, it's nearly impossible for the WWII-era Japanese or Germans to be portrayed as anything other than universally evil, hateful people who spend all their time scowling, shouting, goosestepping, and crashing their planes into things.

The victor doesn't just get the spoils -- they also write the history books, and they almost always minimize their own shameful behavior while playing up that of the other side.

The truth of war is that evil people are everywhere, good people are everywhere, and both end up doing evil -- no matter what their reason.


Taking POW-s is not shameful behavior... in fact, it is the polar opposite.
 
2014-08-12 09:27:09 PM  
Hey Japanese, Australia was settled by British prisoners. You broke out of one prison to hide in another.
 
2014-08-12 09:32:24 PM  

gweilo8888: Gunther: In the end, perhaps we've neglected the Cowra Breakout because people have chosen to ignore it.

Or more likely because it was entirely pointless and all the prisoners who escaped were killed or recaptured in short order.

When Allied prisoners escaped camps they could at least hope they'd run into sympathetic civilians who'd help get them out of the country, what were WW2 Japanese soldiers in the middle of Australia gonna do, trek a thousand miles across a desert filled with things that wanted to kill them and then swim an ocean?

Or even more likely there was no propaganda value in a story where the enemy couldn't be portrayed as pure evil.

Even now, this long later, it's nearly impossible for the WWII-era Japanese or Germans to be portrayed as anything other than universally evil, hateful people who spend all their time scowling, shouting, goosestepping, and crashing their planes into things.

The victor doesn't just get the spoils -- they also write the history books, and they almost always minimize their own shameful behavior while playing up that of the other side.

The truth of war is that evil people are everywhere, good people are everywhere, and both end up doing evil -- no matter what their reason.


Not really. There are a fair number of films that may portray individual Axis soldiers as sympathetic or at least having some redeeming aspects. Das Boot and Letters from Iwo Jima are examples.

Of course, there's also the fact that the common IJA troops did absolutely monstrous things in much of the occupied territory. The Wehrmacht wasn't generally as bad as them.
 
2014-08-12 09:38:25 PM  

iheartscotch: gweilo8888: Gunther: In the end, perhaps we've neglected the Cowra Breakout because people have chosen to ignore it.

Or more likely because it was entirely pointless and all the prisoners who escaped were killed or recaptured in short order.

When Allied prisoners escaped camps they could at least hope they'd run into sympathetic civilians who'd help get them out of the country, what were WW2 Japanese soldiers in the middle of Australia gonna do, trek a thousand miles across a desert filled with things that wanted to kill them and then swim an ocean?

Or even more likely there was no propaganda value in a story where the enemy couldn't be portrayed as pure evil.

Even now, this long later, it's nearly impossible for the WWII-era Japanese or Germans to be portrayed as anything other than universally evil, hateful people who spend all their time scowling, shouting, goosestepping, and crashing their planes into things.

The victor doesn't just get the spoils -- they also write the history books, and they almost always minimize their own shameful behavior while playing up that of the other side.

The truth of war is that evil people are everywhere, good people are everywhere, and both end up doing evil -- no matter what their reason.

Soooooo....

All sides are bad, choose Nazi?


Nope. All success are bad, choose not fighting over petty diary and if you want it bad enough, negotiate and pay a fair price.
 
2014-08-12 09:39:24 PM  
Goddamn autocorrect. That should've been "all sides" and "petty shiat".
 
2014-08-12 09:40:17 PM  

fusillade762: Interesting read. Thanks, subby.


It just reinforces the belief that Japanese are nutty, because where the fark they gonna go? It's not like they're gonna blend in anywhere.
 
2014-08-12 09:40:44 PM  

Yogimus: gweilo8888: Gunther: In the end, perhaps we've neglected the Cowra Breakout because people have chosen to ignore it.

Or more likely because it was entirely pointless and all the prisoners who escaped were killed or recaptured in short order.

When Allied prisoners escaped camps they could at least hope they'd run into sympathetic civilians who'd help get them out of the country, what were WW2 Japanese soldiers in the middle of Australia gonna do, trek a thousand miles across a desert filled with things that wanted to kill them and then swim an ocean?

Or even more likely there was no propaganda value in a story where the enemy couldn't be portrayed as pure evil.

Even now, this long later, it's nearly impossible for the WWII-era Japanese or Germans to be portrayed as anything other than universally evil, hateful people who spend all their time scowling, shouting, goosestepping, and crashing their planes into things.

The victor doesn't just get the spoils -- they also write the history books, and they almost always minimize their own shameful behavior while playing up that of the other side.

The truth of war is that evil people are everywhere, good people are everywhere, and both end up doing evil -- no matter what their reason.

Taking POW-s is not shameful behavior... in fact, it is the polar opposite.


Did I say that part was the shameful behavior? No, I didn't. We have plenty of shame of our own though, but you won't hear about almost any of it in the media or movies.
 
2014-08-12 09:41:57 PM  

Mock26: And it all pales in comparison of Franz von Werra, who managed to escape from Canada, cross (then Neutral) America, make it to Brazil, and from there back to Spain, Italy, and Germany!


Not even close to being comparable. Those Japanese never stood a chance of getting back home. They would have had to hide from the local population throughout their time on the lam while trying to live off the land.

As for von Werra, you make it sound like he somehow had to work his way home secretly and stealthily. He didn't.
For him, the only semi-tricky bit was crossing the frozen St-Lawrence to get from the Canadian to the US side.
Once in the US, he simply turned himself in to the authorities. While US and Canadian authorities were discussing extraditing him to Canada, the local German consul paid for his trip down to Mexico and from there down to South America and back to Europe. Basically, once he made it to Ogdensburg, NY, his return home was pretty much a given.
 
2014-08-12 09:42:35 PM  

optional: gweilo8888: Gunther: In the end, perhaps we've neglected the Cowra Breakout because people have chosen to ignore it.

Or more likely because it was entirely pointless and all the prisoners who escaped were killed or recaptured in short order.

When Allied prisoners escaped camps they could at least hope they'd run into sympathetic civilians who'd help get them out of the country, what were WW2 Japanese soldiers in the middle of Australia gonna do, trek a thousand miles across a desert filled with things that wanted to kill them and then swim an ocean?

Or even more likely there was no propaganda value in a story where the enemy couldn't be portrayed as pure evil.

Even now, this long later, it's nearly impossible for the WWII-era Japanese or Germans to be portrayed as anything other than universally evil, hateful people who spend all their time scowling, shouting, goosestepping, and crashing their planes into things.

The victor doesn't just get the spoils -- they also write the history books, and they almost always minimize their own shameful behavior while playing up that of the other side.

The truth of war is that evil people are everywhere, good people are everywhere, and both end up doing evil -- no matter what their reason.

Not really. There are a fair number of films that may portray individual Axis soldiers as sympathetic or at least having some redeeming aspects. Das Boot and Letters from Iwo Jima are examples.

Of course, there's also the fact that the common IJA troops did absolutely monstrous things in much of the occupied territory. The Wehrmacht wasn't generally as bad as them.


Two examples out of how many? For every one semi-realistic film, there are dozens of Pearl Harbors.

We did absolutely monstrous things, too. How many films about those can you recall?
 
2014-08-12 09:43:06 PM  

gweilo8888: Did I say that part was the shameful behavior? No, I didn't. We have plenty of shame of our own though, but you won't hear about almost any of it in the media or movies.


So write and publish a movie.
 
2014-08-12 09:44:35 PM  

gweilo8888: optional: gweilo8888: Gunther: In the end, perhaps we've neglected the Cowra Breakout because people have chosen to ignore it.

Or more likely because it was entirely pointless and all the prisoners who escaped were killed or recaptured in short order.

When Allied prisoners escaped camps they could at least hope they'd run into sympathetic civilians who'd help get them out of the country, what were WW2 Japanese soldiers in the middle of Australia gonna do, trek a thousand miles across a desert filled with things that wanted to kill them and then swim an ocean?

Or even more likely there was no propaganda value in a story where the enemy couldn't be portrayed as pure evil.

Even now, this long later, it's nearly impossible for the WWII-era Japanese or Germans to be portrayed as anything other than universally evil, hateful people who spend all their time scowling, shouting, goosestepping, and crashing their planes into things.

The victor doesn't just get the spoils -- they also write the history books, and they almost always minimize their own shameful behavior while playing up that of the other side.

The truth of war is that evil people are everywhere, good people are everywhere, and both end up doing evil -- no matter what their reason.

Not really. There are a fair number of films that may portray individual Axis soldiers as sympathetic or at least having some redeeming aspects. Das Boot and Letters from Iwo Jima are examples.

Of course, there's also the fact that the common IJA troops did absolutely monstrous things in much of the occupied territory. The Wehrmacht wasn't generally as bad as them.

Two examples out of how many? For every one semi-realistic film, there are dozens of Pearl Harbors.

We did absolutely monstrous things, too. How many films about those can you recall?


Oh God, you're one of those people.
 
2014-08-12 09:45:25 PM  

Yogimus: gweilo8888: Did I say that part was the shameful behavior? No, I didn't. We have plenty of shame of our own though, but you won't hear about almost any of it in the media or movies.

So write and publish a movie.


There's this small thing called "financing and distribution".

Write an honest, fair movie and you can basically guarantee you'll get neither.
 
2014-08-12 09:46:14 PM  

gweilo8888: optional: gweilo8888: Gunther: In the end, perhaps we've neglected the Cowra Breakout because people have chosen to ignore it.

Or more likely because it was entirely pointless and all the prisoners who escaped were killed or recaptured in short order.

When Allied prisoners escaped camps they could at least hope they'd run into sympathetic civilians who'd help get them out of the country, what were WW2 Japanese soldiers in the middle of Australia gonna do, trek a thousand miles across a desert filled with things that wanted to kill them and then swim an ocean?

Or even more likely there was no propaganda value in a story where the enemy couldn't be portrayed as pure evil.

Even now, this long later, it's nearly impossible for the WWII-era Japanese or Germans to be portrayed as anything other than universally evil, hateful people who spend all their time scowling, shouting, goosestepping, and crashing their planes into things.

The victor doesn't just get the spoils -- they also write the history books, and they almost always minimize their own shameful behavior while playing up that of the other side.

The truth of war is that evil people are everywhere, good people are everywhere, and both end up doing evil -- no matter what their reason.

Not really. There are a fair number of films that may portray individual Axis soldiers as sympathetic or at least having some redeeming aspects. Das Boot and Letters from Iwo Jima are examples.

Of course, there's also the fact that the common IJA troops did absolutely monstrous things in much of the occupied territory. The Wehrmacht wasn't generally as bad as them.

Two examples out of how many? For every one semi-realistic film, there are dozens of Pearl Harbors.

We did absolutely monstrous things, too. How many films about those can you recall?


You really can't compare what anyone did, even the Russians, to the Japanese and Germans, but in reality you probably hear less about Japanese atrocities than would be expected. The focus is usually the Germans, but the Japanese as a whole were worse to the average prisoner/civilian/enemy. Our worst atrocities in WWII were equivalent to kicking a dead guy in the shin.
 
2014-08-12 09:46:52 PM  
The fences aren't to keep you in mate, they are to keep the snakes, spiders, crocs, jellyfish, sharks ..... out.
 
2014-08-12 09:47:12 PM  

gweilo8888: Yogimus: gweilo8888: Did I say that part was the shameful behavior? No, I didn't. We have plenty of shame of our own though, but you won't hear about almost any of it in the media or movies.

So write and publish a movie.

There's this small thing called "financing and distribution".

Write an honest, fair movie and you can basically guarantee you'll get neither.


So you only stand behind your views so long as they are profitable?
 
2014-08-12 09:47:45 PM  

optional: gweilo8888: optional: gweilo8888: Gunther: In the end, perhaps we've neglected the Cowra Breakout because people have chosen to ignore it.

Or more likely because it was entirely pointless and all the prisoners who escaped were killed or recaptured in short order.

When Allied prisoners escaped camps they could at least hope they'd run into sympathetic civilians who'd help get them out of the country, what were WW2 Japanese soldiers in the middle of Australia gonna do, trek a thousand miles across a desert filled with things that wanted to kill them and then swim an ocean?

Or even more likely there was no propaganda value in a story where the enemy couldn't be portrayed as pure evil.

Even now, this long later, it's nearly impossible for the WWII-era Japanese or Germans to be portrayed as anything other than universally evil, hateful people who spend all their time scowling, shouting, goosestepping, and crashing their planes into things.

The victor doesn't just get the spoils -- they also write the history books, and they almost always minimize their own shameful behavior while playing up that of the other side.

The truth of war is that evil people are everywhere, good people are everywhere, and both end up doing evil -- no matter what their reason.

Not really. There are a fair number of films that may portray individual Axis soldiers as sympathetic or at least having some redeeming aspects. Das Boot and Letters from Iwo Jima are examples.

Of course, there's also the fact that the common IJA troops did absolutely monstrous things in much of the occupied territory. The Wehrmacht wasn't generally as bad as them.

Two examples out of how many? For every one semi-realistic film, there are dozens of Pearl Harbors.

We did absolutely monstrous things, too. How many films about those can you recall?

Oh God, you're one of those people.


"Those people" being what, pray tell? People who are realistic, logical, educated, and well-traveled? Guilty as charged.

Do you really believe the color of your skin, your ethnicity, your accent or your language make you more or less likely to be evil? No?

Then why are you arguing?
 
2014-08-12 09:53:07 PM  

capt.hollister: Mock26: And it all pales in comparison of Franz von Werra, who managed to escape from Canada, cross (then Neutral) America, make it to Brazil, and from there back to Spain, Italy, and Germany!

Not even close to being comparable. Those Japanese never stood a chance of getting back home. They would have had to hide from the local population throughout their time on the lam while trying to live off the land.

As for von Werra, you make it sound like he somehow had to work his way home secretly and stealthily. He didn't.
For him, the only semi-tricky bit was crossing the frozen St-Lawrence to get from the Canadian to the US side.
Once in the US, he simply turned himself in to the authorities. While US and Canadian authorities were discussing extraditing him to Canada, the local German consul paid for his trip down to Mexico and from there down to South America and back to Europe. Basically, once he made it to Ogdensburg, NY, his return home was pretty much a given.


Yet he was the only POW to escape from Canada or America and make it back to Germany to fight again for his country.  You may dismiss that out of hand, but I will not.
 
2014-08-12 09:56:30 PM  

CruJones: gweilo8888: optional: gweilo8888: Gunther: In the end, perhaps we've neglected the Cowra Breakout because people have chosen to ignore it.

Or more likely because it was entirely pointless and all the prisoners who escaped were killed or recaptured in short order.

When Allied prisoners escaped camps they could at least hope they'd run into sympathetic civilians who'd help get them out of the country, what were WW2 Japanese soldiers in the middle of Australia gonna do, trek a thousand miles across a desert filled with things that wanted to kill them and then swim an ocean?

Or even more likely there was no propaganda value in a story where the enemy couldn't be portrayed as pure evil.

Even now, this long later, it's nearly impossible for the WWII-era Japanese or Germans to be portrayed as anything other than universally evil, hateful people who spend all their time scowling, shouting, goosestepping, and crashing their planes into things.

The victor doesn't just get the spoils -- they also write the history books, and they almost always minimize their own shameful behavior while playing up that of the other side.

The truth of war is that evil people are everywhere, good people are everywhere, and both end up doing evil -- no matter what their reason.

Not really. There are a fair number of films that may portray individual Axis soldiers as sympathetic or at least having some redeeming aspects. Das Boot and Letters from Iwo Jima are examples.

Of course, there's also the fact that the common IJA troops did absolutely monstrous things in much of the occupied territory. The Wehrmacht wasn't generally as bad as them.

Two examples out of how many? For every one semi-realistic film, there are dozens of Pearl Harbors.

We did absolutely monstrous things, too. How many films about those can you recall?

You really can't compare what anyone did, even the Russians, to the Japanese and Germans, but in reality you probably hear less about Japanese atrocities than would be expected. The focus is usually the Germans, but the Japanese as a whole were worse to the average prisoner/civilian/enemy. Our worst atrocities in WWII were equivalent to kicking a dead guy in the shin.


Our own atrocities are just as bad, only on a smaller, more individual scale. Testing bio and chemical warfare agents on our own people or those we rule or capture. Mass rapes. Summarily executing people only to find out they were innocent. You name it, we did it, too.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_war_crimes#World_War_II

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allied_war_crimes_during_World_War_II
 
2014-08-12 09:57:11 PM  

Yogimus: gweilo8888: Yogimus: gweilo8888: Did I say that part was the shameful behavior? No, I didn't. We have plenty of shame of our own though, but you won't hear about almost any of it in the media or movies.

So write and publish a movie.

There's this small thing called "financing and distribution".

Write an honest, fair movie and you can basically guarantee you'll get neither.

So you only stand behind your views so long as they are profitable?


There's very little point writing or filming something for an audience of one.
 
2014-08-12 10:01:12 PM  

gweilo8888: Yogimus: gweilo8888: Yogimus: gweilo8888: Did I say that part was the shameful behavior? No, I didn't. We have plenty of shame of our own though, but you won't hear about almost any of it in the media or movies.

So write and publish a movie.

There's this small thing called "financing and distribution".

Write an honest, fair movie and you can basically guarantee you'll get neither.

So you only stand behind your views so long as they are profitable?

There's very little point writing or filming something for an audience of one.


That right there is an excuse, not a reason. Hell, go do a youtube series on it. If you put in the work of research and editing, people will see it.

Or you know... maybe you just think its cool to throw out a piquant fark america statement in a thread. I mean that's cool too.
 
2014-08-12 10:15:11 PM  

InterruptingQuirk: Approves

[img.fark.net image 652x368]

/obscure?
//my screengrab, you can't GIS this one biatches
///slashies for courage


Got to see him play Henry Higgins.
 
2014-08-12 10:23:08 PM  
I really want to know why the Japanese had baseball bats. Especially because I didn't think of it as being an Australian sport. If anything I would believe it would be a cricket bat.

/I can't believe I'm the first to mention this.
 
2014-08-12 10:27:01 PM  

gweilo8888: optional: gweilo8888: optional: gweilo8888: Gunther: In the end, perhaps we've neglected the Cowra Breakout because people have chosen to ignore it.

Or more likely because it was entirely pointless and all the prisoners who escaped were killed or recaptured in short order.

When Allied prisoners escaped camps they could at least hope they'd run into sympathetic civilians who'd help get them out of the country, what were WW2 Japanese soldiers in the middle of Australia gonna do, trek a thousand miles across a desert filled with things that wanted to kill them and then swim an ocean?

Or even more likely there was no propaganda value in a story where the enemy couldn't be portrayed as pure evil.

Even now, this long later, it's nearly impossible for the WWII-era Japanese or Germans to be portrayed as anything other than universally evil, hateful people who spend all their time scowling, shouting, goosestepping, and crashing their planes into things.

The victor doesn't just get the spoils -- they also write the history books, and they almost always minimize their own shameful behavior while playing up that of the other side.

The truth of war is that evil people are everywhere, good people are everywhere, and both end up doing evil -- no matter what their reason.

Not really. There are a fair number of films that may portray individual Axis soldiers as sympathetic or at least having some redeeming aspects. Das Boot and Letters from Iwo Jima are examples.

Of course, there's also the fact that the common IJA troops did absolutely monstrous things in much of the occupied territory. The Wehrmacht wasn't generally as bad as them.

Two examples out of how many? For every one semi-realistic film, there are dozens of Pearl Harbors.

We did absolutely monstrous things, too. How many films about those can you recall?

Oh God, you're one of those people.

"Those people" being what, pray tell? People who are realistic, logical, educated, and well-traveled? Guilty as charged.

D ...


No, "those people" are the ones who are so sheltered from the reality of the world that they'd play the moral equivalence card. Yes, the Allies did commit war crimes during World War 2-some of them without any real strategic value. Because war is an ugly, ugly thing, but for all that it's sometimes better than allowing the worst of humanity to have their way with the world.

And for the record, I have a Master's degree, I've traveled to a number of different countries, and I'm half-Japanese.
 
2014-08-12 10:31:01 PM  

optional: And for the record, I have a Master's degree, I've traveled to a number of different countries, and I'm half-Japanese.


And before anyone asks, the TOP half.
 
2014-08-12 10:34:53 PM  

Snarfangel: optional: And for the record, I have a Master's degree, I've traveled to a number of different countries, and I'm half-Japanese.

And before anyone asks, the TOP half.


I lol'd.
 
2014-08-12 10:44:06 PM  
Not many people know this about World War 2, but Colonel Hogan had tunnels all over the place under Stalag 13, right under Colonel Kilnk's nose. Most people know nothing. Nothing.
 
2014-08-12 10:47:03 PM  

CruJones: No it doesn't, a horde of armed prisoners overwhelming a significantly smaller force is not near as cool as digging a secret tunnel mad then jumping a fence on a motorcycle.

/plus the Japanese are the bad guys


Bad guys? It's 2014 and any talk of the Cowra breakout would likely be in the frame of "*noble PoC massacred trying to escape their white male oppressors*".
 
2014-08-12 10:55:10 PM  

Yogimus: That right there is an excuse, not a reason. Hell, go do a youtube series on it. If you put in the work of research and editing, people will see it.

Or you know... maybe you just think its cool to throw out a piquant fark america statement in a thread. I mean that's cool too.


There's also the fact that I can't video edit my way out of a wet paper bag. I'm a good still photographer, but a crap videographer. ;-)

optional: No, "those people" are the ones who are so sheltered from the reality of the world that they'd play the moral equivalence card. Yes, the Allies did commit war crimes during World War 2-some of them without any real strategic value. Because war is an ugly, ugly thing, but for all that it's sometimes better than allowing the worst of humanity to have their way with the world.

And for the record, I have a Master's degree, I've traveled to a number of different countries, and I'm half-Japanese.


None of which means that the *average* Japanese or German person -- and I have never lived in either country, but have lived on all three continents for extended periods, and have close friends of both nationalities -- is or was any more bloodthirsty or warmongering than the average American, Brit, or any other nationality. (Because by and large, they're *not*.) For the most part, people are people -- they don't want to kill, they don't want to send their kids off to be killed, they just want to live their lives.

But that's how they're portrayed in most media, because we wrote the history books and we control the largest part of the entertainment industry.

Agree or not as you like, but it's the simple truth.
 
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