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(Miami Herald)   FWS declares butterflies endangered to stop new Walmart   (miamiherald.com ) divider line
    More: Florida  
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1696 clicks; posted to Geek » on 13 Aug 2014 at 12:10 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



23 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-08-12 11:34:22 PM  
good
 
2014-08-12 11:53:40 PM  
Good, Walmart moves in, lays down shallow roots, and competes with native stores of every kind, driving them to extinction. Walmart needs a culling.
 
2014-08-13 12:20:12 AM  
A butterfly flaps it's wings in Florida and a Walmart in Florida is destroyed.

that is one badass flutterby.
 
2014-08-13 12:22:15 AM  

TheOther: A butterfly flaps it's wings in Florida and a Walmart in Florida is destroyed.

that is one badass flutterby.


He's from Willow Farm.

\butterflies, flutterbyes, gutterflies
 
2014-08-13 01:58:01 AM  
The listing and habitat designation do not stop development, but they do mean the land will have to be carefully managed, federal officials said
 
2014-08-13 02:25:20 AM  
lh5.googleusercontent.com

/seriously, they're trying to be the ONLY grocery retailer in the South
//their #1 target seems to be Winn-Dixie, since they can't take out Publix
 
2014-08-13 02:35:28 AM  
I'd rather look at a butterfly than a Wal-Mart. The former look nice. Wal-Marts just make you question your dedication to giving a sh*t about other humans. Butterflies just do their thing without ruining other things. Like my eyesight.
 
2014-08-13 03:41:57 AM  
Many butterflies are having trouble, like bees and other insects, because we're more or less developing every square foot and the habitat they need (wildflower meadows and such) is getting rare. Take farming - in the interest of "efficiency", farmers have taken to filling in ponds (wetlands), plowing under to the very edges of streams, and in general leaving very little wild stuff on their land. They're also causing huge marine dead zones because of fertilizer and shiat that washes into the water with no wetland or wild barrier to dull the impact, even though they've gotten more efficient at using fertilizer in general.

That's not even touching the still expanding sprawl and urban development, which is pretty destructive too. A parking lot doesn't support a lot of life.

Wal Mart is just one developer among many. Development is, by it's nature, a destructive process. I am rather fatalistic about it; until human poulation stops growing, development will continue. It is possible to be less destructive or to rebuild habitat (look at the LA river, much better than it was before), but we aren't putting things back together as fast as we are taking them apart.

But it would be nice if we could do something good for the butterflies. If that means Wal Mart has to fark off, I am not complaining.
 
2014-08-13 05:56:31 AM  

bluorangefyre: [lh5.googleusercontent.com image 288x288]

/seriously, they're trying to be the ONLY grocery retailer in the South
//their #1 target seems to be Winn-Dixie, since they can't take out Publix


I know a guy who works for Walmart. We got to talking about stores and stuff, and I told him I prefer Publix to the atmosphere at Walmart. He said his wife likes Publix better than Walmart, too.

I moved my prescriptions to a Walmart "Neighborhood" store from a "big" Walmart. Partly for convenience, but also because I got to the point where I dreaded going through the rest of the "big" Walmart to get to the pharmacy and get out again. Which is sad, because the Pharmacy staff there is awesome, they know what "customer service" means. But so does the pharmacist at the new place.
 
2014-08-13 06:38:52 AM  

bikerific: The listing and habitat designation do not stop development, but they do mean the land will have to be carefully managed, federal officials said


Sounds expensive, good thing they have lots of money to cover such costs.  Kidding!  The money is for lawyers to file lawsuits over burdensome regulations.
 
2014-08-13 08:53:19 AM  
Anyone say good yet?
 
2014-08-13 09:51:18 AM  

bluorangefyre: [lh5.googleusercontent.com image 288x288]

/seriously, they're trying to be the ONLY grocery retailer in the South
//their #1 target seems to be Winn-Dixie, since they can't take out Publix


Winn Dixie needs to go.  Really, I've never seen such consistently poor customer service throughout a nationwide chain.  It's like no one in the entire organization gives a fark.  "Well, we mostly serve the working poor and/or minorities, so they should just be grateful that we're willing to sell to them."  If Wal-Mart drives them out, so be it, survival of the fittest.
 
2014-08-13 10:15:42 AM  

FLMountainMan: bluorangefyre: [lh5.googleusercontent.com image 288x288]

/seriously, they're trying to be the ONLY grocery retailer in the South
//their #1 target seems to be Winn-Dixie, since they can't take out Publix

Winn Dixie needs to go.  Really, I've never seen such consistently poor customer service throughout a nationwide chain.  It's like no one in the entire organization gives a fark.  "Well, we mostly serve the working poor and/or minorities, so they should just be grateful that we're willing to sell to them."  If Wal-Mart drives them out, so be it, survival of the fittest.


But then where will I get BOGO London Broil? I only go to Winn Dixie for meat, and that very occassionally, but they do have some good meat deals sometimes. Of course, so did Sweetbay.

But yeah, customer service blows. And the atmosphere is so damn depressing. I've never been in a brightly lit Winn Dixie with clean floors. I'm not sure if they exist.
 
2014-08-13 10:39:34 AM  

adamatari: Many butterflies are having trouble, like bees and other insects, because we're more or less developing every square foot and the habitat they need (wildflower meadows and such) is getting rare. Take farming - in the interest of "efficiency", farmers have taken to filling in ponds (wetlands), plowing under to the very edges of streams, and in general leaving very little wild stuff on their land. They're also causing huge marine dead zones because of fertilizer and shiat that washes into the water with no wetland or wild barrier to dull the impact, even though they've gotten more efficient at using fertilizer in general.

That's not even touching the still expanding sprawl and urban development, which is pretty destructive too. A parking lot doesn't support a lot of life.

Wal Mart is just one developer among many. Development is, by it's nature, a destructive process. I am rather fatalistic about it; until human poulation stops growing, development will continue. It is possible to be less destructive or to rebuild habitat (look at the LA river, much better than it was before), but we aren't putting things back together as fast as we are taking them apart.

But it would be nice if we could do something good for the butterflies. If that means Wal Mart has to fark off, I am not complaining.


In fact, sometimes the opposite, as evidenced by a bee die-off in Oregon two years in a row because of illegal pesticide spraying on parking lot tress while they were in bloom.
 
2014-08-13 11:15:47 AM  

bikerific: The listing and habitat designation do not stop development, but they do mean the land will have to be carefully managed, federal officials said


What's left to manage after it's all paved over?
 
2014-08-13 11:33:09 AM  
In the 1990s, there was a movie titled "Hoot" about a group of kids who try to prevent the
construction of an IHOP-type restaurant on grounds inhabited by an obscure species of owl...
I guess life does imitate art.
 
2014-08-13 12:04:27 PM  

Li'l Robbie: In the 1990s, there was a movie titled "Hoot" about a group of kids who try to prevent the
construction of an IHOP-type restaurant on grounds inhabited by an obscure species of owl...
I guess life does imitate art.


In the 70's it was the snail darter (a type of fish) vs TVA. More info here.
 
2014-08-13 12:09:49 PM  

adamatari: Many butterflies are having trouble, like bees and other insects, because we're more or less developing every square foot and the habitat they need (wildflower meadows and such) is getting rare. Take farming - in the interest of "efficiency", farmers have taken to filling in ponds (wetlands), plowing under to the very edges of streams, and in general leaving very little wild stuff on their land. They're also causing huge marine dead zones because of fertilizer and shiat that washes into the water with no wetland or wild barrier to dull the impact, even though they've gotten more efficient at using fertilizer in general.

That's not even touching the still expanding sprawl and urban development, which is pretty destructive too. A parking lot doesn't support a lot of life.

Wal Mart is just one developer among many. Development is, by it's nature, a destructive process. I am rather fatalistic about it; until human poulation stops growing, development will continue. It is possible to be less destructive or to rebuild habitat (look at the LA river, much better than it was before), but we aren't putting things back together as fast as we are taking them apart.

But it would be nice if we could do something good for the butterflies. If that means Wal Mart has to fark off, I am not complaining.


The Walmart in d'Iberville Mississippi single handedly is supporting the seagull population of the Gulf Coast.  On any given day there are hundreds of them flying around looking for the droppings of the Walmart people.
 
2014-08-13 12:41:50 PM  
I think that I shall never see
a Walmart lovely as a bee.
Indeed, unless Monsanto falls
I'll never see a bee at all.
 
2014-08-13 01:25:59 PM  
So where should low income family's shop for food if not WalMart?
 
2014-08-13 01:26:34 PM  
families
 
2014-08-13 04:02:00 PM  
Butterflies are weird, in that there are actually entire species, not sub-species or varieties, that are only found in tiny little acres. The Palos Verde and El Segundo Blue butterfly come to mind, as a kid growing up in southern California. I think they blocked LAX expansion a couple of times to protect the little blue butterflies. That's some hardcore specialization, if an entire species only exists in a small acre plot under the flight path of one of the busiest airports in the world.
 
2014-08-13 07:22:40 PM  

thetrenchcoat: So where should low income family's shop for food if not WalMart?


Well, they do get an employee discount there, after all.
 
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