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(Wired)   WW1 aerial photography shows the scale of the massive devastation, makes you realize that much of Europe is the Continental equivalent of US strip malls   (wired.com) divider line 21
    More: Interesting, World War I, aerial photography, aerial reconnaissance, video overlay  
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5653 clicks; posted to Geek » on 11 Aug 2014 at 2:34 PM (36 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



21 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-08-11 01:51:51 PM  
Dan Carlin's current series on WW1 is incredible. It's difficult to imagine it only being 100 years ago.
 
2014-08-11 02:41:39 PM  
"For the first time in human history, warring sides could see each other from above and plan their attack."

Really?
www.civilwar.org
 
2014-08-11 02:41:43 PM  

b2theory: Dan Carlin's current series on WW1 is incredible. It's difficult to imagine it only being 100 years ago.


Big fan of his brother George, but would be more impressive if it was Dan Halen.
 
2014-08-11 02:45:57 PM  
www.wired.com

Passchendaele, before the War.

www.wired.com

Passchendaele, after.
 
2014-08-11 02:59:29 PM  
Gah...when did Wired's site design get so bad? Slow to load, it's 50% ads, and that's before the popups.

We truly are in a latrine right now when it comes to web design. Looking at abortions like si.com I am wondering if developers even remotely consider the wants of the reader anymore.
 
2014-08-11 03:05:44 PM  

Captain Steroid: [www.wired.com image 850x511]

Passchendaele, before the War.

[www.wired.com image 850x511]

Passchendaele, after.


Those are the two photos I immediately thought of. Definitely some coincidence goin' on, as today I also learned more specifics about a relative's death on the lead-up to the Somme in 1916. Poor kid was digging an assault trench, and their position got the crap hammered out of it by German artillery. From all accounts, the whole party should have been killed, but as it was, only about half caught it.
 
2014-08-11 03:10:43 PM  
See my spirit on the wind
Across the lines, beyond the hill
Friend and foe will meet again
Those who died at Paschendale
 
2014-08-11 03:14:24 PM  

SacriliciousBeerSwiller: Gah...when did Wired's site design get so bad?


I've notice over the last year and a half most sites have gone through "unfortunate" redesigns.  The menu across the top with various topic categories has gone by the wayside in favor of infinity long pages you have to scroll down through.  I blame the mobile computer user.
 
2014-08-11 03:15:28 PM  

Captain Steroid: [www.wired.com image 850x511]

Passchendaele, before the War.

[www.wired.com image 850x511]

Passchendaele, after.


Passchendaele waaaaaay after.  Looks like they rebuilt nicely although you couldn't pay me enough to dig any kind of utilities or basements there...UXO heaven.

img.fark.net
 
2014-08-11 03:52:05 PM  
the entire continent gets blown to hell in two wars and they can't get around to building straight roads?  WTF Europe?
 
2014-08-11 04:17:42 PM  

Outlawtsar: Captain Steroid: [www.wired.com image 850x511]

Passchendaele, before the War.

[www.wired.com image 850x511]

Passchendaele, after.

Passchendaele waaaaaay after.  Looks like they rebuilt nicely although you couldn't pay me enough to dig any kind of utilities or basements there...UXO heaven.

[img.fark.net image 850x502]


Pretty much, yes. Not to mention corpse parts, old hazardous chemicals, rubble and cement blasted down into the earth.

CSB- When I was walking the lines of the Somme battlefield a few years ago, I was told by the locals to be very careful, as there were loads of ancient shells about. You can see some piled up by farmers (nope nope nope) but lots more are buried. One farmer related to me some folksy wisdom: fields with cows in are probably mostly clear, sheep less so, and an empty field, well...watch your feet. Gave me a real appreciation for where I was walking. Found some expended bullets, left them there- they might have gone through somebody on their journey, so no thanks.
 
2014-08-11 04:51:09 PM  
Nice find, Subby.

Depressing and horrific as hell, but still very interesting.

/thanks
 
2014-08-11 08:01:04 PM  

Plant Rights Activist: the entire continent gets blown to hell in two wars and they can't get around to building straight roads?  WTF Europe?


Different people probably owned the property on either side of the old road. So the new line was a kinda given to be the same.

I don't really like straight roads anyway.
 
2014-08-11 08:29:01 PM  
Stupid Flanders....


www.wired.com
 
2014-08-11 09:07:32 PM  
9 MILLION dead, 21 MILLION wounded, 7.5 MILLION missing...followed immediately by at least 50 MILLION worldwide lost to the Spanish Flu epidemic...

/hard to imagine retaining any hope after all that
//many of those missing weren't deserters, they were simply buried forever by the churn of exploding shells blasting dirt up
///*shudder*
 
2014-08-11 10:48:41 PM  

spawn73: Plant Rights Activist: the entire continent gets blown to hell in two wars and they can't get around to building straight roads?  WTF Europe?

Different people probably owned the property on either side of the old road. So the new line was a kinda given to be the same.

I don't really like straight roads anyway.


Neither do most urbanists, the studies of how straight, wide roads we have in the US, are actually pretty horrible and the 'European' style of roadways create better environments and living conditions.
 
2014-08-12 12:52:15 AM  
thing is the fighting in world war II on the western front was mobile enough that there was no where near the concentrated shelling in one area then there was in the much more static western front of WWI so its no surprise that there craptons of WWI ordinance still in the ground.
 
2014-08-12 12:54:06 AM  

LemSkroob: spawn73: Plant Rights Activist: the entire continent gets blown to hell in two wars and they can't get around to building straight roads?  WTF Europe?

Different people probably owned the property on either side of the old road. So the new line was a kinda given to be the same.

I don't really like straight roads anyway.

Neither do most urbanists, the studies of how straight, wide roads we have in the US, are actually pretty horrible and the 'European' style of roadways create better environments and living conditions.


Interesting. I would have thought the grid design, whether for downtown districts or residential areas (assuming the lay of the land allows it), to be classically useful.
 
2014-08-12 04:40:56 AM  

KerwoodDerby: 9 MILLION dead, 21 MILLION wounded, 7.5 MILLION missing...followed immediately by at least 50 MILLION worldwide lost to the Spanish Flu epidemic...

/hard to imagine retaining any hope after all that
//many of those missing weren't deserters, they were simply buried forever by the churn of exploding shells blasting dirt up
///*shudder*


My great grandfather on my mothers side was blown to vapour by a direct hit in 1918 at Paschendale, there was nothing left to bury but he got his name on the Tyne Cot memorial so at least he's not one of the missing.
 
2014-08-12 10:13:32 AM  

b2theory: Dan Carlin's current series on WW1 is incredible. It's difficult to imagine it only being 100 years ago.


I just listened to it two weeks ago.  Yes, it is excellent.
 
2014-08-12 10:38:49 AM  

Huck And Molly Ziegler: LemSkroob: spawn73: Plant Rights Activist: the entire continent gets blown to hell in two wars and they can't get around to building straight roads?  WTF Europe?

Different people probably owned the property on either side of the old road. So the new line was a kinda given to be the same.

I don't really like straight roads anyway.

Neither do most urbanists, the studies of how straight, wide roads we have in the US, are actually pretty horrible and the 'European' style of roadways create better environments and living conditions.

Interesting. I would have thought the grid design, whether for downtown districts or residential areas (assuming the lay of the land allows it), to be classically useful.


If you really want to look more into it, check out some books by people like Kevin Lynch (Image of the City), or Jane Jacobs, or William Whyte.

They all touched on ideas about placemaking/wayfinding, and how people react and interpret their own urban environments. In short, grid cities are are actually not only more difficult to use (wayfinding) (it offers little natural navigational aids like turns or landmarks that stick in peoples minds that help them get around), but are so sterile that people can't even remember things about them (placemaking), even when they live in it.


... The Image of the City, where he defined wayfinding as "a consistent use and organization of definite sensory cues from the external environment."

Its hard for grid cities to give much feedback to the user, so the user can't relate to it, and therefore they limit their interaction with it.

Also see:
Lewis Mumford
Camillo Sitte
Oscar Newman
FL Olmstead


These ides were picked up in part by the New Urbanism movement, to varying degrees of success.
 
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