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(io9)   ALVIN   (space.io9.com ) divider line
    More: Cool, DSV Alvin, swordfish, Mid-Atlantic Ridge, submersibles, mid-ocean ridges, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, juan, deepwater  
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5352 clicks; posted to Geek » on 10 Aug 2014 at 1:31 PM (1 year ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



29 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-08-10 11:21:21 AM  
Fifty years... that's just insane.  I'm not really up to date on current exploration, but what do modern submersibles look like?
 
2014-08-10 11:48:41 AM  
Happy birthday you sexy thing.
 
2014-08-10 11:54:22 AM  
Okay!
 
2014-08-10 01:04:30 PM  

Xaxor: Fifty years... that's just insane.  I'm not really up to date on current exploration, but what do modern submersibles look like?


Alvin *IS* a modern one.
 
2014-08-10 01:50:12 PM  
I still have my Alvin and the Chipmunks Christmas cassette tape. Lyrical brilliance.
 
2014-08-10 02:22:31 PM  
Good read. Thank you subby.
 
2014-08-10 02:36:43 PM  

Xaxor: Fifty years... that's just insane.  I'm not really up to date on current exploration, but what do modern submersibles look like?


media1.s-nbcnews.com

images.nationalgeographic.com

James Cameron's Deepsea Challenge 3D
 
2014-08-10 02:42:16 PM  
"By its 30th birthday in 1994, Alvin posed a philosophical challenge: is it still the same machine when every component and part has been replaced at some point for repair or upgrade?  "

Do we still have any of the cells that made up our body when we were born? They say that the human body replaces all of it's cells every 7 years. Are we all just clones of our 2007 selves?
 
2014-08-10 02:48:32 PM  
SixPaperJoint:

img.fark.net

James Cameron's Deepsea Challenge 3D


oi61.tinypic.com
 
2014-08-10 02:53:39 PM  
I had thought of invoking My Grandfather's Axe, but I think the Wikipedia article is more complete.
 
2014-08-10 02:55:11 PM  
In 1962, the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute (WHOI) contracted with General Mills, makers of Cheerios, to build a research submarine.

What the hell?

In 1991, Alvin helpfully searched for and retrieved the lost remote operated vehicle tow system CURV III

Wikipedia has nothing about this, but it does mention CURV-1 being brought in to finish a job that Alvin started. Both of which are on the timeline linked by io9.

That's some pretty cool stuff. I didn't know this was the one that found the gas-eating seafloor worms.
 
2014-08-10 03:04:03 PM  
"...a titanium sphere cockpit 2.1 meters in diameter where the pilot and two scientists..."

Dang, for a crew of 3 that's tiny.

And a question: Looking at the chemosynthetic life - do scientists have an idea if that came into being entirely separately from photosynthetic life?
 
2014-08-10 03:08:25 PM  
Cool thing I remember for reading Alvin stories in Nat. Geographic as a kid - they take styrofoam wig head-models down in the open parts of the sub where the crushing pressure turns them into dive souvenirs.

people.whitman.edu
graphics8.nytimes.com
 
2014-08-10 03:10:07 PM  
O-KAY, DAVE!!!
 
2014-08-10 03:15:34 PM  

Fark like a Barsoomian: contracted with General Mills, makers of Cheerios, to build a research submarine.

What the hell?


Yeah  I was curious about that, too, I Googled it.

From the U. of Minnesota - Minnesota Computing Companies

During World War II, General Mills became involved in the production of naval gun sights, torpedo directors and other military equipment. The food giant continued this production after the war, when it produced 2,000 bomb sights for the U.S. Air Force's B47 bomber. The manufacture of other military equipment, as well as the bomb sight, developed into the Mechanical Division of the company. Approximately 1957, the company formally established a digital computer laboratory at its East Hennepin Ave. facility in Minneapolis.

June 28, 1957 the Mechanical Division was awarded a contract by the Engineer Research and Development Laboratories, Corps of Engineers, for the development of an Automatic Position Survey Equipment used to conduct first order astronomic surveys of the Earth's surface. It utilized a computer developed by General Mills known as the Automatic Position Survey Analyzer and Computer (APSAC). APSAC used a 512 word core memory (6-bit words).

March 14, 1960 General Mills announced a new computer, the General Mills' 2003, an all transistorized general purpose computer with a 4k core memory (36-bit word). Francis Alterman was manager of the digital computer laboratory.

June 1961 General Mills reorganized such operations under the Electronics Group, which included Electronic and Mechanical Defense Products, Balloon and Aerospace Systems, Automatic Handling Equipment and Research. Richard A. Wilson directed the operation of the Group. Subsidiaries of the Group included Magnaflux Corporation (Chicago), and the Daven Co. (with operation in NJ and NH)
 
2014-08-10 04:00:35 PM  

SixPaperJoint: Xaxor: Fifty years... that's just insane.  I'm not really up to date on current exploration, but what do modern submersibles look like?

[media1.s-nbcnews.com image 474x317]

[images.nationalgeographic.com image 435x580]

James Cameron's Deepsea Challenge 3D


ngm.nationalgeographic.com
It's a mermaid glamor shot. :D

Too bad it's fake and he's only holding his breath in three inches of water.
 
2014-08-10 04:56:32 PM  

jaytkay: Cool thing I remember for reading Alvin stories in Nat. Geographic as a kid - they take styrofoam wig head-models down in the open parts of the sub where the crushing pressure turns them into dive souvenirs.


The Master approves.
 
2014-08-10 06:02:42 PM  
In 1966, Alvin teamed up with CURV to search for and recover an hydrogen bomb dropped during a ship collisionnear Spain. The next year, the submersible got in a fight with a swordfish, dragging the fish to the surface where it was cooked and eaten for dinner.

Science used to be a LOT of fun.
 
2014-08-10 06:35:18 PM  
The good news is that there isn't anything wrong with the radio.
 
2014-08-10 07:21:12 PM  
General Mills? WTF? If I were looking for someone to design and build a groundbreaking deep submersible vehicle, I wouldn't immediately think of a breakfast-cereal manufacturer.
 
2014-08-10 08:02:35 PM  

buckler: General Mills? WTF? If I were looking for someone to design and build a groundbreaking deep submersible vehicle, I wouldn't immediately think of a breakfast-cereal manufacturer.


They could give out a toy version in their cereal.
 
2014-08-10 08:42:06 PM  

TV's Vinnie: "By its 30th birthday in 1994, Alvin posed a philosophical challenge: is it still the same machine when every component and part has been replaced at some point for repair or upgrade?  "

Do we still have any of the cells that made up our body when we were born? They say that the human body replaces all of it's cells every 7 years. Are we all just clones of our 2007 selves?


Your neurons don't die and get replaced.
 
2014-08-10 09:05:25 PM  
General Mills? WTF? If I were looking for someone to design and build a groundbreaking deep submersible vehicle, I wouldn't immediately think of a breakfast-cereal manufacturer.

Yeah, but the result was GRRRREAT!
 
2014-08-10 09:31:15 PM  
Excerpt from page 1 of the operating manual:

Consumption of cabbage, eggs, or draft beer prohibited less than three days from a dive.
 
2014-08-10 09:57:36 PM  

jaytkay: "...a titanium sphere cockpit 2.1 meters in diameter where the pilot and two scientists..."

Dang, for a crew of 3 that's tiny.

And a question: Looking at the chemosynthetic life - do scientists have an idea if that came into being entirely separately from photosynthetic life?


There is the idea that the chemosynthetic life led to photosynthetic life when the opportunity to utilize light came around.
 
2014-08-10 10:50:29 PM  
img.fark.net
Hai guyz, wat's going on in dis thred?
 
2014-08-10 11:21:28 PM  
Industrial machines are relatively easy to make.
 
2014-08-11 01:57:12 PM  

Lord Jubjub: jaytkay: "...a titanium sphere cockpit 2.1 meters in diameter where the pilot and two scientists..."

Dang, for a crew of 3 that's tiny.

And a question: Looking at the chemosynthetic life - do scientists have an idea if that came into being entirely separately from photosynthetic life?

There is the idea that the chemosynthetic life led to photosynthetic life when the opportunity to utilize light came around.


Or the other way around.
 
2014-08-11 03:15:28 PM  

Insult Comic Bishounen: [img.fark.net image 480x360]
Hai guyz, wat's going on in dis thred?


well that's horrifying.
 
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