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(NPR)   Architect designing a zoo free of cages and glass enclosures, failing to realize that a concept like that exists called NATURE   (npr.org) divider line 48
    More: Stupid  
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4766 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 Aug 2014 at 12:13 PM (41 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



48 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-08-10 11:13:20 AM  
Nature? How would I charge admission for that?
 
2014-08-10 11:32:50 AM  
Actually, a large percentage of common zoo animals DON'T have a natural home to return to. That's the problem with rampant deforestation and other exploitative capitalist practices.

So fark you sideways with a rusty iron horsecock subbo.
 
2014-08-10 11:39:01 AM  
So for something based on nature, that central orb of WTFness doesn't look very natural to me.
 
2014-08-10 12:18:36 PM  
That design looks like a 1950s concept of the future.
 
2014-08-10 12:21:15 PM  
Didn't Disney's Animal Kingdom try the whole "invisible barrier" thing already?
 
2014-08-10 12:21:39 PM  

edmo: Nature? How would I charge admission for that?


It's called a State or National park. It's done all the time.
 
2014-08-10 12:24:02 PM  
i.imgur.com

It's not a zoo entrance, it's a feeding dish.

For tigers.
 
2014-08-10 12:24:16 PM  

Truther: Didn't Disney's Animal Kingdom try the whole "invisible barrier" thing already?


Yep, successfully. Check out Google Maps of "Disney's Animal Kingdom", and you can see how they disguised a lot of the barriers.

See also "ha-ha" from the 1600s: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ha-ha - "[A] recessed landscape design element that creates a vertical barrier while preserving views. The design includes a turfed incline which slopes downward to a sharply vertical face, typically a masonry retaining wall. Ha-has are used in landscape design to prevent access to a garden, for example by grazing livestock, without obstructing views."
 
2014-08-10 12:24:40 PM  

Truther: Didn't Disney's Animal Kingdom try the whole "invisible barrier" thing already?


The barriers at Disney are invisible to the guests, I'm not sure they are invisible to the animals.  Of course I can't figure out if the proposed zoo in the article makes the barriers invisible to the animals either.
 
2014-08-10 12:26:09 PM  

edmo: Nature? How would I charge admission for that?


the Affordable Care Act
 
2014-08-10 12:26:29 PM  
There is a place near Lakeland, FL called Safari Wilderness that is kind of like this. I think the owner used to run the Tampa Zoo but hated the enclosures and unnatural settings so he bought hundreds of acres and created a small African Savannah (without predators of course). You take an open bus through the fields and see the animals roaming in packs and interacting like in nature. He is also working on permission to have elephants and in another area he has a giraffe sanctuary based on the same principal.
 
2014-08-10 12:27:02 PM  
Nature? We've got to get rid of nature..That's where all the bad stuff is..Like Bigfoot, and genetic mutants who want to chop us up and eat us....
 
2014-08-10 12:29:53 PM  
img.fark.net
"...and here we see our herd of Asians in their cage-free habitat..."
 
2014-08-10 12:30:55 PM  

RamboBrite: Truther: Didn't Disney's Animal Kingdom try the whole "invisible barrier" thing already?

Yep, successfully. Check out Google Maps of "Disney's Animal Kingdom", and you can see how they disguised a lot of the barriers.

See also "ha-ha" from the 1600s: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ha-ha - "The design includes a turfed incline which slopes downward to a sharply vertical face"


Around here, women call them hoo-hahs.
 
2014-08-10 12:32:02 PM  

RamboBrite: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ha-ha


Must resist temptation to post certain picture on that Wikipedia page...
 
2014-08-10 12:36:20 PM  
Just another pretentious douchbag architect
 
2014-08-10 12:39:05 PM  

FriarReb98: So for something based on nature, that central orb of WTFness doesn't look very natural to me.


That's a very good way to describe a lot of BIG's projects (well, they're not all orbs, but "WTFness" is appropriate).
 
2014-08-10 12:44:36 PM  
TFA audio: "Find different ways of hiding the barriers between the people and the animals"

Has any 1st world zoo built in the past 50 years NOT had that goal?
 
2014-08-10 12:45:26 PM  
oh, denmark - where they kill the animals in front of children and feed them to the lions?
 
2014-08-10 12:45:52 PM  
While I respect this guys's desire to want to make zoo's feel more natural, money says the big game predators (lions, tigers, bears) along with probably a good portion of the primates figure out how to bolt their enclosure... and thats when some kid/mom/Peter Dinklage, end up becoming something's dinner.

Glass walls and enclosures are a pretty solid way to make sure animals don;t hurt each other or other humans, and even they fail on occasion, whether through design oversight, human stupidity in interacting with the enclosure, or the animals figuring how to finally get through that tiny crack and run free to chase the human herd. If this guy is going to sell me on his idea (which he doesn't have to but just saying) then he had better visit every zoo where the enclosure didn't work to protect either the safety of the humans or the safety of the animals and then show precisely how this new design would;t let that happen despite there being no glass or metal bars.
 
2014-08-10 12:45:52 PM  
"Zoos without walls" have been around for a long time. What he really means is "zoos with camouflaged walls that cost a lot more," and that the animals don't really care either way.

"I have food, other animals like me, and some room to walk around? Cool. Hey, look at that goofy kid with the big ears."
 
2014-08-10 12:51:07 PM  
So I guess they've never heard of San Diego's Safari Park (nee: Wild Animal Park).  Sure it has some enclosures for the more bitey animals but the ones that don't eat each other roam pretty free.  And drive-thru parks were around before most of us were born.  This isn't a new concept.
 
2014-08-10 12:56:26 PM  

doglover: Actually, a large percentage of common zoo animals DON'T have a natural home to return to. That's the problem with rampant deforestation and other exploitative capitalist practices.

So fark you sideways with a rusty iron horsecock subbo.


Capitalist practices, blah, blah, blah. The politics tab is over there ->
 
2014-08-10 12:59:19 PM  
This is common. The zoo in Singapore is a perfect and successful example.
 
2014-08-10 01:00:18 PM  
Carl Hagenback did this in Europe in the 1907.  He's the guy who created the without cages concept that modern zoos use today.
 
2014-08-10 01:03:59 PM  
They used to have LION COUNTRY SAFARI in California,
Where you drive through a small preserve and let wild animals
shred the F*UCK out of your paint job.

I remember it fondly.

SIMBA, NOOOOOOO
img.fark.net
 
2014-08-10 01:11:13 PM  
I think it was the Martians that took this concept to it's pinnicle:

img.fark.net
 
2014-08-10 01:28:09 PM  

edmo: Nature? How would I charge admission for that?


www.seattlesouthside.com

They found a way in the PNW.
 
2014-08-10 01:32:01 PM  

doglover: Actually, a large percentage of common zoo animals DON'T have a natural home to return to.


[Citation Needed]


Just looking at the map I brought home from taking my family to the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium last week, and I see some common animals in zoos listed such as the:

alligator, bat, brown bear, beaver, bison, bobcat, camel, cheetah, deer, elephant, flamingo, fox, gazelle, giraffe, gorilla, kangaroo, koala, lion, monkey, moose, ostrich, otter, parrot, penguin, prairie dog, pronghorns, reindeer, swan, wolverine, wolf, zebra.

Are all those nature shows I watch with my kids that show these animals in the wild a product of a Hollywood soundstage and CGI?
 
2014-08-10 01:41:40 PM  
John, the kind of control you're attempting simply is... it's not possible. If there is one thing the history of evolution has taught us it's that life will not be contained. Life breaks free, it expands to new territories and crashes through barriers, painfully, maybe even dangerously, but, uh... well, there it is.

3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-08-10 01:49:08 PM  
I always thought Jurassic Park would've been far more successful if they'd left the dinos to roam freely in a habitat a la The Lost World, and used sky trains or enclosed vehicles/vehicle tunnels, to move the people around the park unobtrusively.

/contain humans, not the animals.
 
2014-08-10 02:07:04 PM  

Mrkos: Carl Hagenback did this in Europe in the 1907.  He's the guy who created the without cages concept that modern zoos use today.


I like Hagenbeck's Tiergarten's approach to "Don't Feed the Animals"

They put a few goats between the visitor fence and the display animals.  Nothing edible gets past the goats.
 
2014-08-10 02:29:45 PM  
Didn't Futurama do this one, the one where Fry and Leela were the display about the mating habits of humans for the planet of apes?
 
2014-08-10 02:39:16 PM  

edmo: Nature? How would I charge admission for that?


Call it a national park.
 
2014-08-10 02:52:43 PM  

Russ1642: edmo: Nature? How would I charge admission for that?
Call it a national park.


Ahhhh, nature. So wild and untrammeled.....

oopsjohn.files.wordpress.com
/why yes, I do just feel like being an asshole
 
2014-08-10 02:57:40 PM  
Sorry, tardmitter, but people expect zoos to be places where the animals are all happy and healthy and none of them ever attack or injure each other for any reason.

/in other words, very very VERY much not nature
 
2014-08-10 03:05:16 PM  
You can't keep people out of NATURE.
 
2014-08-10 03:14:24 PM  
Went to a concept zoo like that in France once. From the entrance along the main path, there was a litttle hill behind which there was an island, on which chimpanzees roamed freely. Except you couldn't see that, because of the crescent. So you enter the zoo under the impression that you're actually sharing a space, unhindered, with a big ape.

Let's just say I held back for a while. Until I was certain things were safe.
 
2014-08-10 03:45:12 PM  

Vlad_the_Inaner: Mrkos: Carl Hagenback did this in Europe in the 1907.  He's the guy who created the without cages concept that modern zoos use today.

I like Hagenbeck's Tiergarten's approach to "Don't Feed the Animals"

They put a few goats between the visitor fence and the display animals.  Nothing edible gets past the goats.


Anybody using that method now? Would keep the morons fron getting pulled into cages.
 
2014-08-10 05:11:32 PM  
From the comments:

 Zoos as exemplifications of imperialism is a well-established historical fact

Oh, STFU.  I know every time I visit a zoo I think about how we conquered and tamed and colonized all of Africa and it makes me realize what a great country we have and how awesome imperialism is.

Yeah, that's it.

He'd probably get along well with an ex-girlfriend of mine who was nuttier than an Almond Joy candy bar.  Early in our relationship I suggested we go to the zoo since we both love animals.  Apparently, this was a terrible idea.  "Oh no, I don't want to go see animals in cages.  It's so cruel."

She seemed to consider zoos to be something like what happened in the movie Hostel and people going to the zoo were like the people paying for the privilege to torture animals.

I should have dumped her right then, but I needed to get laid a few more times so I put up with her shiat until I couldn't stand it anymore.
 
2014-08-10 05:20:43 PM  
An admirable concept, but letting the gnus, antelopes, orangutans, and breakfast cereals.... oops..... letting them live together with the lions and tigers and bears might, er, end up limiting the species on display (after a time).
 
2014-08-10 05:34:56 PM  

fanbladesaresharp: Vlad_the_Inaner: Mrkos: Carl Hagenback did this in Europe in the 1907.  He's the guy who created the without cages concept that modern zoos use today.

I like Hagenbeck's Tiergarten's approach to "Don't Feed the Animals"

They put a few goats between the visitor fence and the display animals.  Nothing edible gets past the goats.

Anybody using that method now? Would keep the morons fron getting pulled into cages.


For predator cages, Difficulty: keeping the goats from getting pulled in  if you are worried about people getting pulled in.

/The elephants at Hagenbecks were not goat-warded.  They were allowed to be fed. And they knew the difference between a coin and food by trunk-feel.   They'd pass the coin to a human keeper, who would thank the visitor.
//This was late 70's, who knows if they still do that
 
2014-08-10 05:54:47 PM  

Vlad_the_Inaner: They'd pass the coin to a human keeper, who would thank the visitor.


Dawwwww.

One of my favorite memories is giving peanuts to elephants at the circus. 40+ years later I remember the feeling of the trunk nostrils on my hand and the warm breath.

My parents took us to watch them put up the tent. They used the elephants as heavy machinery to pull up the tent poles.
 
2014-08-10 06:52:09 PM  
Zoos are evil
 
2014-08-10 07:15:34 PM  

cryinoutloud: /why yes, I do just feel like being an asshole


I've told this CSB before, but it's topical:

When I was younger, my family would vacation every year in Wyoming, since my mom was invited to play in a music festival in Jackson Hole. My dad was a scout and grandfather was a scoutmaster, and along with my mom being an outdoorsy/hiking type, we were taught as very young children that nature was something to be appreciated, respected, and conserved, and that when we went to national parks and nature reserves, we were the guests of the land and animals, not the other way around. As such, it became great sport to our family on these trips to make light of the idiocy displayed by people who did not share these views and values.

Our favorite method was "The Stupid Sightseeing Tourist" game, in which we'd be puttering from location to location in a park, or on our way home after a day hike, and we'd pull over and stop on the side of the road. We'd get out, cameras and binoculars in hand, and start gesticulating wildly at something in the distance. Naturally, other cars would follow suit, and a snowball effect would occur. There was never anything we'd seen in the first place, and the game was to see how many cars you could get to pull over, and agree with you in seeing something that wasn't there.

Our record was 56 cars. On one occasion, a ranger pulled over and happened to ask us (out of the dozen or so cars) what we saw. We said "stupid tourists", and he chuckled, said "Yeah, it's their season right now" and drove away.
 
2014-08-10 07:37:26 PM  

grinding_journalist: Our favorite method was "The Stupid Sightseeing Tourist" game


I don't see what's so stupid about the tourists. You lied about seeing something interesting and people that wanted to see something interesting believed you because they had no reason not to. You tricked some tourists and also made them trick other tourists. You and your family are assholes.
 
2014-08-10 07:56:24 PM  

Tobin_Lam: You and your family are assholes.


So you would have been one of the ones who pulled over and insisted they saw something that wasn't there. Got it.
 
2014-08-11 09:20:33 AM  
Nobody wants to see a bunch of herd animals.
 
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