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(NPR)   There is still one town where children have paper routes, and of course it's in Iowa   (npr.org ) divider line 62
    More: Spiffy  
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3042 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Aug 2014 at 1:20 AM (1 year ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-08-07 12:43:09 AM  
Jaxson Kuhlmann delivers 36 to 38 papers daily on his figure-eight shaped route around the neighborhood. It never takes him longer than a half-hour

They're paid the same as adults: 10 to 12 cents a copy.


Unless my math has failed that works out to $4.56, max. $9.12 an hour. The minimum wage in Iowa is $10.10 an hour.

No judgement there, just numbers.
 
2014-08-07 01:29:26 AM  
The kids are probably packing heat too.
 
2014-08-07 01:31:35 AM  

fusillade762: Jaxson Kuhlmann delivers 36 to 38 papers daily on his figure-eight shaped route around the neighborhood. It never takes him longer than a half-hour

They're paid the same as adults: 10 to 12 cents a copy.

Unless my math has failed that works out to $4.56, max. $9.12 an hour. The minimum wage in Iowa is $10.10 an hour.

No judgement there, just numbers.


I did that crap as a kid - in all weather.  I would not let my daughter do that - pure exploitation.
 
2014-08-07 01:31:51 AM  
Iowa's minimum wage is $7.25 per hour. http://www.iowaworkforce.org/labor/minwage.pdf
 
2014-08-07 01:31:54 AM  

fusillade762: Jaxson Kuhlmann delivers 36 to 38 papers daily on his figure-eight shaped route around the neighborhood. It never takes him longer than a half-hour

They're paid the same as adults: 10 to 12 cents a copy.

Unless my math has failed that works out to $4.56, max. $9.12 an hour. The minimum wage in Iowa is $10.10 an hour.

No judgement there, just numbers.


Well then I guess he better deliver more papers in that half hour
 
2014-08-07 01:31:55 AM  
They uh don't have Hispanic people there or something ?
 
2014-08-07 01:33:54 AM  

fusillade762: Jaxson Kuhlmann delivers 36 to 38 papers daily on his figure-eight shaped route around the neighborhood. It never takes him longer than a half-hour

They're paid the same as adults: 10 to 12 cents a copy.

Unless my math has failed that works out to $4.56, max. $9.12 an hour. The minimum wage in Iowa is $10.10 an hour.

No judgement there, just numbers.


Minimum wage is 7.25 an hour in Iowa per department of labor site. Or am I missing something from your post?
 
2014-08-07 01:39:49 AM  

one of Ripley's Bad Guys: I did that crap as a kid - in all weather.  I would not let my daughter do that - pure exploitation.


I had a paper route when I was a kid (ages 9-13).  I loved it.  I made a couple hundred bucks a month (this was in the late 1980s to early 1990s).  There was no other way for me to get money; my family didn't believe in giving us kids allowances, so I took a paper route.

/female
//never felt exploited
 
2014-08-07 01:42:10 AM  

one of Ripley's Bad Guys: fusillade762: Jaxson Kuhlmann delivers 36 to 38 papers daily on his figure-eight shaped route around the neighborhood. It never takes him longer than a half-hour

They're paid the same as adults: 10 to 12 cents a copy.

Unless my math has failed that works out to $4.56, max. $9.12 an hour. The minimum wage in Iowa is $10.10 an hour.

No judgement there, just numbers.

I did that crap as a kid - in all weather.  I would not let my daughter do that - pure exploitation.


Do you think he still wants $2 or is it more with inflation?
 
2014-08-07 01:43:21 AM  

Pointy Tail of Satan: The kids are probably packing heat too.


No idea about the kids, but over in Ottumwa, Iowa, Radar isn't carrying any sort of a weapon.

/over half won't know wtf I was talking about
 
2014-08-07 01:48:15 AM  
Also depends if he was an employee vs. Independent contractor. If you're working for yourself minimum wage laws don't apply.
 
2014-08-07 01:55:19 AM  
Subby, what is this "paper" of which you speak?
 
2014-08-07 01:58:44 AM  

zulius: one of Ripley's Bad Guys: fusillade762: Jaxson Kuhlmann delivers 36 to 38 papers daily on his figure-eight shaped route around the neighborhood. It never takes him longer than a half-hour

They're paid the same as adults: 10 to 12 cents a copy.

Unless my math has failed that works out to $4.56, max. $9.12 an hour. The minimum wage in Iowa is $10.10 an hour.

No judgement there, just numbers.

I did that crap as a kid - in all weather.  I would not let my daughter do that - pure exploitation.

Do you think he still wants $2 or is it more with inflation?


$2 in 1985 is worth $4.42, according to the inflation calculator at dollartimes.com. "I want my $4.42" doesn't have the same ring to it.
 
2014-08-07 02:01:39 AM  
Johnny Gosh and Eugene Martin would not approve.
 
2014-08-07 02:07:44 AM  
i291.photobucket.com

/30 years ago farkers
 
2014-08-07 02:10:38 AM  
In other news, Subby: "There is still one town where children have adults read the paper routes, and of course it's in Iowa"

/used to live in Iowa myself
//got a kick
 
2014-08-07 02:13:01 AM  
Had a paper route for six months as a kid. Child labor exploitation, pure and simple. Made crap money for too much work. You only got paid a percentage off the paid subscribers, but were expected to deliver the paper to twice that many number of houses as freebies to attract more subscribers.

This was in 1978, and my first week I made less than $30 for a route that took me at least two hours a day to cover. It never got any better than that . I'd have to wake up at 5 am just to get the route finished and be at school by 8:00.

This is why the papers are delivered in LA these days by people in pickup trucks.
 
2014-08-07 02:14:56 AM  
My local newspaper driver then switches caps to run the tool rental desk at the Home Depot. He's got a serious case of "work ethic".
 
2014-08-07 02:17:42 AM  

wildcardjack: He's got a serious case of "work ethic minimum wage drudgery".


Fixed.
 
2014-08-07 02:24:53 AM  

Frederick: Johnny Gosh and Eugene Martin would not approve.


Indeed.

The Johnny Gosch story is a never ending tragedy. His parents ended up divorcing over the stress of it. His mother has been victimized by at least one hoax and continues to cling to hopes, real or imagined, that he is still alive. I saw her in a local Des Moines area store a couple of months ago. It has taken a heavy toll on her. As a parent and a grandparent, I can sympathize. There can be no worse thing for a parent to experience.

Personally, I think he and Eugene Martin, another Des Moines Register paperboy who disappeared a year later, are dead. I think it is quite likely their remains will turn up eventually, likely in some Dallas County former farm field being developed for a new subdivision or mall.
 
2014-08-07 02:36:36 AM  

Guilty_plea_bargain: fusillade762: Jaxson Kuhlmann delivers 36 to 38 papers daily on his figure-eight shaped route around the neighborhood. It never takes him longer than a half-hour

They're paid the same as adults: 10 to 12 cents a copy.

Unless my math has failed that works out to $4.56, max. $9.12 an hour. The minimum wage in Iowa is $10.10 an hour.

No judgement there, just numbers.

Minimum wage is 7.25 an hour in Iowa per department of labor site. Or am I missing something from your post?


My bad, you are correct. I Googled it and just seized on the first number I saw, which was incorrect.
 
2014-08-07 02:45:55 AM  

fusillade762: Guilty_plea_bargain: fusillade762: Jaxson Kuhlmann delivers 36 to 38 papers daily on his figure-eight shaped route around the neighborhood. It never takes him longer than a half-hour

They're paid the same as adults: 10 to 12 cents a copy.

Unless my math has failed that works out to $4.56, max. $9.12 an hour. The minimum wage in Iowa is $10.10 an hour.

No judgement there, just numbers.

Minimum wage is 7.25 an hour in Iowa per department of labor site. Or am I missing something from your post?

My bad, you are correct. I Googled it and just seized on the first number I saw, which was incorrect.


"Facts" on the Internet aren't worth the paper they're printed on.
 
2014-08-07 02:54:28 AM  
I have occasion to do research in our local paper's microfilm and have seen that in the late 1930s, a newspaper route seemed like a prestigious thing. As a group the newsboys went on picnics, went to ballgames and movies and just generally enjoyed the camaraderie.

I'm sure the working conditions were often crap, but consider their conception of the world at the time: To be independently making money outside of a farm field was probably pretty neat.
 
2014-08-07 02:57:46 AM  

gerbilpox: fusillade762: Guilty_plea_bargain: fusillade762: Jaxson Kuhlmann delivers 36 to 38 papers daily on his figure-eight shaped route around the neighborhood. It never takes him longer than a half-hour

They're paid the same as adults: 10 to 12 cents a copy.

Unless my math has failed that works out to $4.56, max. $9.12 an hour. The minimum wage in Iowa is $10.10 an hour.

No judgement there, just numbers.

Minimum wage is 7.25 an hour in Iowa per department of labor site. Or am I missing something from your post?

My bad, you are correct. I Googled it and just seized on the first number I saw, which was incorrect.

"Facts" on the Internet aren't worth the paper they're printed on.


Nah, in this case it's not the Internet's fault. The thing I saw was about a proposal to raise the Federal minimum. Google can take some blame for putting it in a box at the top of the results and highlighting the number, but it's my dumbass fault for not reading the entry.
 
2014-08-07 03:05:48 AM  
All this way down the thread and no one's posted this till I had to. You people are slipping.

archshrk.com
 
2014-08-07 03:08:53 AM  
static.comicvine.com
 
2014-08-07 03:16:37 AM  
Around the DC/Maryland/Virginia suburbs, you can't get those motherfarkers to stop throwing that crap on your driveway.

DEAR WASHINGTON POST: IF YOU WANTED YOUR farkING WEEKEND "EVENTS" RAG, WE'D LOOK IT UP ON THE farkING INTERNET.

Sometimes, I stay up till 5am when that farkface goes through our neighborhood, and I throw that shiat back at his shiatty Hyundai.  One of these days, I'll start saving up cowshiat and I'll make sure they remember.
 
2014-08-07 03:17:55 AM  

TV's Vinnie: All this way down the thread and no one's posted this till I had to. You people are slipping.

[archshrk.com image 800x449]


"TWOOOOOOOOOO DOOLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLAAAAAAAAAAAAGGGGGGGGGHHHHH....."
 
2014-08-07 03:21:38 AM  

Huck And Molly Ziegler: I have occasion to do research in our local paper's microfilm and have seen that in the late 1930s, a newspaper route seemed like a prestigious thing. As a group the newsboys went on picnics, went to ballgames and movies and just generally enjoyed the camaraderie.

I'm sure the working conditions were often crap, but consider their conception of the world at the time: To be independently making money outside of a farm field was probably pretty neat.


Anybody my age or older remember the ads in Boys Life back in the 1960s and 1970s?

"Sell GRIT!"

The old GRIT printing plant is still in the same place in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, though GRIT itself pretty much no longer exists.  The publishers of the old GRIT had a lot to do with Little League, which is why the Little League World Series is in Williamsport, Pennsylvania.
 
2014-08-07 03:42:37 AM  

Frederick: Johnny Gosh and Eugene Martin would not approve.


Instead of Spiffy, the Ironic tag would have been well-served here
 
2014-08-07 03:46:02 AM  

gerbilpox: Subby, what is this "paper" of which you speak?


You know those news sites with paywalls? It used to be that those companies would throw physical copies of their daily archive over the walls of residences onto the roof, imagine it as a sort of enchantment, in exchange for payment.
 
2014-08-07 04:20:20 AM  
I had 3 paper routes some years ago as a kid (1999). ~180ish houses and I'd be done in an hour. Also didn't feel exploited - you don't really clock that many hours overall to expect anything descent... Plus I banked amazing tips on my birthday and christmas.

/that town still does child paper carriers

I live in the next town over now, they use driver carriers here. Also for those that don't read your own local paper., I'd like to throw in this gem I found (Aug 3) in our paper a couple days ago. If nothing more I like to look at the paper for the crime reports.and classifieds,

scontent-a-ord.xx.fbcdn.net

/woooo go Central Missouri
 
2014-08-07 04:37:41 AM  
When I was around 14 I used to deliver flyers for a 2-4-1 pizza joint in Ontario.  I was paid $4 an hour under the table and worked for three hours once or twice a weekend.  When my coworker and I discovered we could just throw the stacks of flyers in a dumpster and sit around for a few hours waiting to be picked up that was what we did.  After a few weeks of that we stopped getting calls to come in to work.  Since we didn't actually work there "officially" that was no problem.  Easy money that paid for a few video games, at least.
 
2014-08-07 05:25:14 AM  
I delivered papers for a little while when I was a kid.  It wasn't a bad job, except for the one client who would call the circulation desk to complain every time the newspaper wasn't plastic-bagged and deposited on her front step  just so(these were our neighborhood's token white trash people, who drove around the suburbs in a big dually truck and had relatives living in a camper parked on the lawn, so we didn't generally give a shiat about anything they said).  I wasn't much of a fan of getting up at 3 am, but it was pretty much the only way I had to get any money into my pocket, so I was OK with that.

Then I discovered that I could make two or three times as much by doing yardwork for my neighbors.  I cut enough grass and raked enough leaves each summer and fall that I had more than enough money to keep my car gassed up until the following spring, and in the winter and spring I split enough firewood and shoveled enough snow to keep myself in reasonably-fashionable threads.  I worked outside, set my own hours, and got paid in cash.  Not a bad deal for a 16-year-old; certainly better than flipping hamburgers or tearing movie tickets.
 
2014-08-07 05:40:57 AM  
That was probably one of the most dangerous jobs I've ever had.
When I was 12, I delivered 56 papers on a route that covered close to a mile at 5 or 6 in the morning.

I remember it still being dark out as I jumped into snowbanks to avoid being hit by the plows that couldn't see me, and by the time I got to school I felt like I already had a pretty full day.

Crappy money, hard work, and "managers" that used to try to rip me off by saying they were now paying more for the papers (despite no cover price increase) so they had to pass that cost on to me.
 
2014-08-07 05:58:52 AM  
Paperboys of the Corn?

All hail He Who Delivers Before The Dawn!
 
hej
2014-08-07 06:31:56 AM  
My first car was paid for with money saved from my paper route that I had when I was 12-13.
 
2014-08-07 06:43:36 AM  
They still print out copies of the news?

I thought that was just for hotels.
 
2014-08-07 07:11:07 AM  

FizixJunkee: one of Ripley's Bad Guys: I did that crap as a kid - in all weather.  I would not let my daughter do that - pure exploitation.

I had a paper route when I was a kid (ages 9-13).  I loved it.  I made a couple hundred bucks a month (this was in the late 1980s to early 1990s).  There was no other way for me to get money; my family didn't believe in giving us kids allowances, so I took a paper route.

/female
//never felt exploited


My oldest brother handed down his route to my other brother; my sister handed down her route to me. The transfers of routes were when we were between eleven and thirteen. Work ethic. Cash. One of the best experiences during our development as tax payers.
 
2014-08-07 07:30:57 AM  

fusillade762: Jaxson Kuhlmann delivers 36 to 38 papers daily on his figure-eight shaped route around the neighborhood. It never takes him longer than a half-hour

They're paid the same as adults: 10 to 12 cents a copy.

Unless my math has failed that works out to $4.56, max. $9.12 an hour. The minimum wage in Iowa is $10.10 an hour.

No judgement there, just numbers.


The  kid in the articele makes $22.50 a week delivering  less that 40 papers per day.  Counting time to roll them (if they still do that ).  That is n to bad change for so little work.

Somebody will demand that  they should get paid a "living wage" for delivering papers and they are taking jobs from adults.   Then the adults wil unionize and won't deliver the paper when it rains or looks like rain or they wil go on stirke because the paoer isn not printed on recycled newsprint with fair trade ink. Of course the price wil go up with a corresponding drop in subscriptions/circulation.then the paper and those jobs will disappear. The kids who used to have the paper routes wil be at home getting fat  and playing video games.
 
2014-08-07 07:34:35 AM  

Danger Avoid Death: Had a paper route for six months as a kid. Child labor exploitation, pure and simple. Made crap money for too much work. You only got paid a percentage off the paid subscribers, but were expected to deliver the paper to twice that many number of houses as freebies to attract more subscribers.

This was in 1978, and my first week I made less than $30 for a route that took me at least two hours a day to cover. It never got any better than that . I'd have to wake up at 5 am just to get the route finished and be at school by 8:00.

This is why the papers are delivered in LA these days by people in pickup trucks.



Accounting for inflation that's like $10/hour today, assuming you delivered 5 days a week.  Hardly child exploitation.
 
2014-08-07 07:43:37 AM  
There's a guy who drives around my neighborhood in his Lincoln Navigator and makes his kids deliver the papers for him every morning around 5am.

/NE Philly
//yo
 
2014-08-07 07:48:40 AM  

FizixJunkee: one of Ripley's Bad Guys: I did that crap as a kid - in all weather.  I would not let my daughter do that - pure exploitation.

I had a paper route when I was a kid (ages 9-13).  I loved it.  I made a couple hundred bucks a month (this was in the late 1980s to early 1990s).  There was no other way for me to get money; my family didn't believe in giving us kids allowances, so I took a paper route.

/female
//never felt exploited


I delivered the Philadelphia Bulletin and Burlington County Times from the time I was 12 until I was 16 (which was the minimum age for a "real" job). My older sister did it too. Not a bad way for a kid to make a little money in the 1980s. Yes, you were out in the rain and snow and cold and heat and whatever, but so what? I knew that was the job when I took it.
 
2014-08-07 07:54:49 AM  

August11: FizixJunkee: one of Ripley's Bad Guys: I did that crap as a kid - in all weather.  I would not let my daughter do that - pure exploitation.

I had a paper route when I was a kid (ages 9-13).  I loved it.  I made a couple hundred bucks a month (this was in the late 1980s to early 1990s).  There was no other way for me to get money; my family didn't believe in giving us kids allowances, so I took a paper route.

/female
//never felt exploited

My oldest brother handed down his route to my other brother; my sister handed down her route to me. The transfers of routes were when we were between eleven and thirteen. Work ethic. Cash. One of the best experiences during our development as tax payers.


As an employer, I added several bonus points towards hiring if a kid had a paper route or farm chores in their background.  Yeah, the work ethic was good.  What was most important to me was that I knew I had a kid that understood responsibility.  The papers had to be delivered every day.  If the kid was sick, he didn't just get to call in and not have another worry.  He had to make arrangements for somebody else to get the papers delivered - correctly and on time.  Want a vacation?  Find a substitute, train him, and have to pay out your earnings for that time period.

Most jobs don't demand that kind of responsibility and far too many people never learn or even understand it.
 
2014-08-07 08:05:41 AM  

Mr. Right: August11: FizixJunkee: one of Ripley's Bad Guys: I did that crap as a kid - in all weather.  I would not let my daughter do that - pure exploitation.

I had a paper route when I was a kid (ages 9-13).  I loved it.  I made a couple hundred bucks a month (this was in the late 1980s to early 1990s).  There was no other way for me to get money; my family didn't believe in giving us kids allowances, so I took a paper route.

/female
//never felt exploited

My oldest brother handed down his route to my other brother; my sister handed down her route to me. The transfers of routes were when we were between eleven and thirteen. Work ethic. Cash. One of the best experiences during our development as tax payers.

As an employer, I added several bonus points towards hiring if a kid had a paper route or farm chores in their background.  Yeah, the work ethic was good.  What was most important to me was that I knew I had a kid that understood responsibility.  The papers had to be delivered every day.  If the kid was sick, he didn't just get to call in and not have another worry.  He had to make arrangements for somebody else to get the papers delivered - correctly and on time.  Want a vacation?  Find a substitute, train him, and have to pay out your earnings for that time period.

Most jobs don't demand that kind of responsibility and far too many people never learn or even understand it.


So true. And well said. You just reminded me of those years, delivering in the rain, with a cold, the immense daily pressure for an eleven year old. It all just flooded back to me and I caught my breath. Good god delivering on that route sucked.
 
2014-08-07 08:09:04 AM  
I had an afternoon route. I made $6 a week for an hour a day (saturday was a morning route). 1974.

I was RICH.
 
2014-08-07 08:31:01 AM  
There is a 3AM newspaper route in my city that is still owned by kids driven around by their parents.
 
2014-08-07 08:35:38 AM  
Oh my god!!! Child abuse!!!
 
2014-08-07 09:13:40 AM  

JMacPA: Danger Avoid Death: Had a paper route for six months as a kid. Child labor exploitation, pure and simple. Made crap money for too much work. You only got paid a percentage off the paid subscribers, but were expected to deliver the paper to twice that many number of houses as freebies to attract more subscribers.

This was in 1978, and my first week I made less than $30 for a route that took me at least two hours a day to cover. It never got any better than that . I'd have to wake up at 5 am just to get the route finished and be at school by 8:00.

This is why the papers are delivered in LA these days by people in pickup trucks.


Accounting for inflation that's like $10/hour today, assuming you delivered 5 days a week.  Hardly child exploitation.


^This^

I had a paper route in suburban New Jersey back in 75-76....I was 11-12 years old at the time.  I delivered papers 6 days a week, about 2 hours a day.....about 40-50 newspapers.   With tips I averaged about $30 per week (roughly $100 adjusted for inflation).  This worked out to $2.50 per hour, at the time min wage was $3.10.   So I was being paid less than min wage?  It was all cash, no money taken out for withholding.  If I was working on the books, I would have probably netted less than $2.50 per hour.

Oh, I learned some important lessons.  How to make a scheduled.  How to manage my time.  How to make change.  Basic inventory and accounting.  Salesmanship.  The most important lessons I learned were that a large percentage of adults will not think twice about robbing a kid.  I also saw my first real live vagina on a real live adult woman.
 
2014-08-07 09:25:02 AM  

Fissile: JMacPA: Danger Avoid Death: Had a paper route for six months as a kid. Child labor exploitation, pure and simple. Made crap money for too much work. You only got paid a percentage off the paid subscribers, but were expected to deliver the paper to twice that many number of houses as freebies to attract more subscribers.

This was in 1978, and my first week I made less than $30 for a route that took me at least two hours a day to cover. It never got any better than that . I'd have to wake up at 5 am just to get the route finished and be at school by 8:00.

This is why the papers are delivered in LA these days by people in pickup trucks.


Accounting for inflation that's like $10/hour today, assuming you delivered 5 days a week.  Hardly child exploitation.

^This^

I had a paper route in suburban New Jersey back in 75-76....I was 11-12 years old at the time.  I delivered papers 6 days a week, about 2 hours a day.....about 40-50 newspapers.   With tips I averaged about $30 per week (roughly $100 adjusted for inflation).  This worked out to $2.50 per hour, at the time min wage was $3.10.   So I was being paid less than min wage?  It was all cash, no money taken out for withholding.  If I was working on the books, I would have probably netted less than $2.50 per hour.

Oh, I learned some important lessons.  How to make a scheduled.  How to manage my time.  How to make change.  Basic inventory and accounting.  Salesmanship.  The most important lessons I learned were that a large percentage of adults will not think twice about robbing a kid.  I also saw my first real live vagina on a real live adult woman.


I delivered papers from ages 8 to 14 years old. I earned enough money to pay for a $5K Pontiac Firebird when I was 16 that was made 6 years after I was born and I loved it. Other parents from school complained that I shouldn't have the car because their childs education was their only job. My parents just laughed and said, "He's a straight A student plus he delivered papers for years to earn the money. If you really want something, it's okay to have more than one job."
 
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