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(Tech Dirt)   Ex-NSA Boss defends patenting a totally brand new, not developed on government time, cybersecurity tech that he only came up with in three months   (techdirt.com) divider line 13
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1471 clicks; posted to Geek » on 06 Aug 2014 at 5:18 PM (24 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-08-06 04:04:09 PM  
I was at his retirement party and his wife's farewell party.  I got to sit through a bunch of slide shows about them.  This guy was an armor platoon leader, intelligence company commander, an intel battalion and brigade command, and he held a bunch of other staff positions.  He was never a hands on cyber guy.  He was a manager.  I think his wife even said he wasn't a huge "computer guy".  How the hell did he develop an all new cyber security system.  I call as much bullshiat as Subby does.
 
2014-08-06 05:24:36 PM  
Ex-NSA Boss.............is eager to make a dollar and a cent off selling snake oil to those who don't know any better.
 
2014-08-06 05:30:02 PM  
I think this guy would look good in orange.
 
2014-08-06 05:42:47 PM  
Next week's headline: Ex-NSA Boss Wondering Who Keeps Sending All these Pizzas To His House.
 
2014-08-06 05:47:57 PM  
Retiring officials get thrown these kinds of deals all the time. This is the American version of generals never retiring and looting money while they're on the job. You get one or the other.

Now if the Federal government truly is unhappy with him, he may suddenly find ownership of his "original works" reverting to his former employer. NSA can complain about this or not it's up to them.
 
2014-08-06 05:49:43 PM  
I think anyone buying security software from an ex-NSA guy deserves what they pay for
 
2014-08-06 05:54:31 PM  

devildog123: I was at his retirement party and his wife's farewell party.  I got to sit through a bunch of slide shows about them.  This guy was an armor platoon leader, intelligence company commander, an intel battalion and brigade command, and he held a bunch of other staff positions.  He was never a hands on cyber guy.  He was a manager.  I think his wife even said he wasn't a huge "computer guy".  How the hell did he develop an all new cyber security system.  I call as much bullshiat as Subby does.


Maybe he took night classes at Phoenix or DeVry.
 
2014-08-06 07:23:10 PM  
The software probably sees more backdoor action than anal pornography.
 
2014-08-07 01:54:15 AM  
FTA : "I'm a cyber guy"

I winced on that statement.  I cannot imagine any propeller-head, techie, hobbyist, Unix beard, CIO, engineer, specialist, analyst, or any other IT related professional that would use that phrase.
 
2014-08-07 07:50:30 AM  

muck1969: FTA : "I'm a cyber guy"

I winced on that statement.  I cannot imagine any propeller-head, techie, hobbyist, Unix beard, CIO, engineer, specialist, analyst, or any other IT related professional that would use that phrase.




As a UNIX-bearded engineer/techie/specialist/analyst I agree with you.

/My business card says "House Wizard"
 
2014-08-07 09:27:31 AM  

muck1969: FTA : "I'm a cyber guy"

I winced on that statement.  I cannot imagine any propeller-head, techie, hobbyist, Unix beard,  CIO, engineer, specialist, analyst, or any other IT related professional that would use that phrase.


The bolded part isn't really true, as that is essentially what Alexander was.

Other than that I agree, as an unbearded security guy I can attest that no one I know that's worth a damn in this field would refer to cyber anything (except for cyber-sex and then only as a throwback to old BBS, chat room, ICQ days).

Also having read a lot of his writing and those who have interviewed him, this guy wouldn't know a secure system from his asshole.   He just spouts out a lot of buzzwords and thinks that and having been in charge of guys who actually know WTF they are doing makes him an expert.
 
2014-08-07 10:00:31 AM  

muck1969: FTA : "I'm a cyber guy"

I winced on that statement.  I cannot imagine any propeller-head, techie, hobbyist, Unix beard, CIO, engineer, specialist, analyst, or any other IT related professional that would use that phrase.


The only time I stumble across the term "cyber" is when I'm dealing with a government customer.  That is their "in" word in the government IT world.  Network platform, cloud resources, security platforms...  all "cyber".

I almost never run into the word when dealing with non-defense contractor companies.  And when I do, usually the person using it was either a government employee or a government contractor within the last 3 years.

All I can guess is there are a influential core group of generals in the Pentagon that just love the term.  One thing to note - "cyber" in their discussions goes beyond just the technology.  They include the human processes of using that technology.  So in their world, you can know absolutely nothing about the underlying hardware and software, yet still be a "cyber guy" if you think about how information gets used by government, or in a warfare context.  Alexander would fall into this later category.

And like in any management - techie relationship, the techies resent the fact that the managers claim "ownership" of what the techies actually do.
 
2014-08-07 12:58:18 PM  

MadHatter500: muck1969: FTA : "I'm a cyber guy"

I winced on that statement.  I cannot imagine any propeller-head, techie, hobbyist, Unix beard, CIO, engineer, specialist, analyst, or any other IT related professional that would use that phrase.

The only time I stumble across the term "cyber" is when I'm dealing with a government customer.  That is their "in" word in the government IT world.  Network platform, cloud resources, security platforms...  all "cyber".

I almost never run into the word when dealing with non-defense contractor companies.  And when I do, usually the person using it was either a government employee or a government contractor within the last 3 years.

All I can guess is there are a influential core group of generals in the Pentagon that just love the term.  One thing to note - "cyber" in their discussions goes beyond just the technology.  They include the human processes of using that technology.  So in their world, you can know absolutely nothing about the underlying hardware and software, yet still be a "cyber guy" if you think about how information gets used by government, or in a warfare context.  Alexander would fall into this later category.

And like in any management - techie relationship, the techies resent the fact that the managers claim "ownership" of what the techies actually do.


Ding, ding, ding, ding...  You win.  Cyber is what the Army is currently calling anything to do with computers and the internet "Cyber".  And, since in this age of draw downs, budget cuts, and force reductions the Cyber Battalions and Brigades are getting more personnel, more training, and, most importantly, more budget money.  So all these generals are sticking their noses in, trying to look important on what is the new big thing in the Army.  And they do it poorly.  They assigned my wife, a History major with no computer science background to a Cyber battalion.  They have her in the Operations office because she has no idea about computers, and this puts her in charge of something that has nothing to do with actual computer stuff.  The problem is, the enlisted guys they assigned to help her with her very minor computer skills needed job are both 35Q- Cryptologic Network Warfare Specialists.  They spent 27 weeks in a course with a 65% failure rate learning their skills, and now they're typing up training rosters and helping to set up PT tests.
 
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