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(Wired)   Why did the guy who discovered Uranus think there's life on the sun? Turns out he's not too bright. That, and he only checked at night   (wired.com) divider line 36
    More: Dumbass, Uranus, Herschel Space Observatory, fixed stars, rocky planet, amateur astronomy, magnetic fields, Chuck Norris  
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1658 clicks; posted to Geek » on 06 Aug 2014 at 11:47 AM (6 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



36 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-08-06 10:27:42 AM
I had no idea my anus was developing it's own gravitational field.

I'd better get to the gym in the next 26 minutes.
 
2014-08-06 10:44:15 AM
It's like that Elton John song, "Don't let your son, go down on me."

Wait, what?
 
2014-08-06 11:18:55 AM
There is life on the sun. I saw it on an episode of Futurama.

oyster.ignimgs.com
 
2014-08-06 11:41:02 AM
Meh, just a bunch of fanciful speculation, Subby.  William Herschel was no retard, not by any stretch of the word.

I have an astronomy book from 1830, and it made for fascinating reading about the speculation of the time about the nature of the sun. Some thought it was a heavenly place where fantastical beings lived.

The book gave a surprisingly good explanation (considering this was before modern atomic theory and E=MC2) of how the sun was putting out all that heat:  A truly VAST number of meteors were smacking into the sun at all angles and at very high speeds, and the kinetic energy of the meteors was turned into heat on impact. The book even made an impressive attempt at some calculations-- back then astronomers knew how far away the sun was and its diameter and had a rough estimate of its mass.

All these huge rocks hitting everywhere all the time would probably rule out anything living on the sun, though.
 
2014-08-06 11:52:42 AM
Maybe he put his head where the sun don't shine.
 
2014-08-06 11:53:26 AM
Maybe he was wearing sunglasses so he could track the visions in the skies.
 
2014-08-06 11:53:59 AM
31.media.tumblr.com
 
2014-08-06 12:00:52 PM
Star Trek did it!

/it's not impossible, just... really unlikely.
 
2014-08-06 12:17:16 PM
Talk about talking out of your ass.
 
2014-08-06 12:26:16 PM

bdub77: It's like that Elton John song, "Don't let your son, go down on me."

Wait, what?


LOL, nobody ever likes when I sing along to that song. I keep trying to tell them that it's a special song Elton wrote for Michael Jackson, like his remake of 'Candle in the Wind' for Princess Di.

As for TFA, I can't believe that someone was wrong 220 years ago. Things like that just don't happen. That guy's blog sucks.
 
2014-08-06 12:43:58 PM
I love this comment from the site:

"There could very well be life on the sun. Of course, this life would have to be nocturnal -- as the intense heat of the day would prohibit life as we know it."

Dumbass.
 
2014-08-06 12:52:38 PM
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2014-08-06 12:53:21 PM

Riche: Meh, just a bunch of fanciful speculation, Subby.   William Herschel was no retard, not by any stretch of the word.

I have an astronomy book from 1830, and it made for fascinating reading about the speculation of the time about the nature of the sun. Some thought it was a heavenly place where fantastical beings lived.

The book gave a surprisingly good explanation (considering this was before modern atomic theory and E=MC2) of how the sun was putting out all that heat:  A truly VAST number of meteors were smacking into the sun at all angles and at very high speeds, and the kinetic energy of the meteors was turned into heat on impact. The book even made an impressive attempt at some calculations-- back then astronomers knew how far away the sun was and its diameter and had a rough estimate of its mass.

All these huge rocks hitting everywhere all the time would probably rule out anything living on the sun, though.


It's just another example of over extrapolation based on lack of data. It still happens today.
 
2014-08-06 12:58:42 PM

Riche: Meh, just a bunch of fanciful speculation, Subby.  William Herschel was no retard, not by any stretch of the word.

I have an astronomy book from 1830, and it made for fascinating reading about the speculation of the time about the nature of the sun. Some thought it was a heavenly place where fantastical beings lived.

The book gave a surprisingly good explanation (considering this was before modern atomic theory and E=MC2) of how the sun was putting out all that heat:  A truly VAST number of meteors were smacking into the sun at all angles and at very high speeds, and the kinetic energy of the meteors was turned into heat on impact. The book even made an impressive attempt at some calculations-- back then astronomers knew how far away the sun was and its diameter and had a rough estimate of its mass.

All these huge rocks hitting everywhere all the time would probably rule out anything living on the sun, though.


Pretty much that. There were some wild ideas and calculations as to how the sun worked before we figured out that whole fusion thing. I've seen calculations as to when a coal sun would burn out.
 
2014-08-06 12:59:17 PM

Because People in power are Stupid: There is life on the sun. I saw it on an episode of Futurama.

[oyster.ignimgs.com image 610x374]


Well, that's a dubious source if I ever saw one.

I get my science information from BBCA...

img.fark.net
 
2014-08-06 01:02:45 PM
Those shifty paradigms will get you every time.
 
2014-08-06 01:02:46 PM

sethen320: I love this comment from the site:

"There could very well be life on the sun. Of course, this life would have to be nocturnal -- as the intense heat of the day would prohibit life as we know it."

Dumbass.


You think? I get the feeling it's more likely someone being silly.
 
2014-08-06 01:05:27 PM
LIke the Sundiver reference here, I think the article is biased towards the notion of carbon-based life, and ignores the possibility of other more exotic self-organizing materials, like magnetically charged plasma or superfluid matter near absolute zero temperatures. Or even the classic Trek alien "energy being".
 
2014-08-06 01:20:08 PM
deadsanta:

LIke the Sundiver reference here, I think the article is biased towards the notion of carbon-based life, and ignores the possibility of other more exotic self-organizing materials, like magnetically charged plasma or superfluid matter near absolute zero temperatures. Or even the classic Trek alien "energy being".

There have been a few 'hard sci-fi' writers such as A.C. Clarke and Frederick Pohl who wrote about beings composed of plasma or ordered fields.

The more you think about it, the more it seems plausible. There's a lot more plasma by a few bajillion orders of magnitude operating for a far longer time than there is water and carbon, and quite a lot more energy.

I for one bow to our new plasma overlords.
 
2014-08-06 01:28:12 PM
lh3.googleusercontent.com

About life on a neutron star.  I highly recommend it.
 
2014-08-06 01:38:58 PM
mademistakes.com
 
2014-08-06 01:45:26 PM
They should change the name to Urectum.
 
2014-08-06 01:50:28 PM

BalugaJoe: They should change the name to Urectum.


Urectum? hell, Yanearlykilledem
 
2014-08-06 01:58:36 PM
"I just discovered Uranus." / (MWAH) "Good night, everybody!"
 
2014-08-06 01:58:56 PM

mrlewish: [upload.wikimedia.org image 318x539]


Came here for this. Nice job. Only one thing to add...

www.fantasywelt.de
 
2014-08-06 02:04:46 PM
weknowmemes.com
 
2014-08-06 02:12:03 PM

Riche: Meh, just a bunch of fanciful speculation, Subby.  William Herschel was no retard, not by any stretch of the word.


To his credit, he picked up a lot of chicks with the line "hey, baby, come back to my place and we can discover Uranus together".
 
2014-08-06 02:25:37 PM
I always refer to it as "The Anus," never "Uranus."
 
2014-08-06 02:41:04 PM
From Wikipedia:

"From 1782 to 1802, and most intensively from 1783 to 1790, Herschel conducted systematic surveys in search of "deep sky" or nonstellar objects with two 20-foot focal length (610 cm), 12-inch aperture (30 cm) and 18.7-inch aperture (47 cm) telescopes (in combination with his favoured 6-inch aperture instrument). Excluding duplicated and "lost" entries, Herschel ultimately discovered over 2400 objects defined by him as nebulae.

In all, Herschel discovered over 800 confirmed double or multiple star systems, almost all of them physical rather than virtual pairs. His theoretical and observational work provided the foundation for modern binary star astronomy; new catalogues adding to his work were not published until after 1820.

Herschel measured the axial tilt of Mars and discovered that the martian ice caps, first observed by Giovanni Domenico Cassini (1666) and Christiaan Huygens (1672), changed size with the planet's seasons.

From studying the proper motion of stars, he was the first to realize that the solar system is moving through space, and he determined the approximate direction of that movement. He also studied the structure of the Milky Way and concluded that it was in the shape of a disk.

Herschel discovered infrared radiation in sunlight by passing it through a prism and holding a thermometer just beyond the red end of the visible spectrum. This thermometer was meant to be a control to measure the ambient air temperature in the room. He was shocked when it showed a higher temperature than the visible spectrum. Further experimentation led to Herschel's conclusion that there must be an invisible form of light beyond the visible spectrum.

Herschel used a microscope to establish that coral was not a plant, as many believed at the time, since it lacked the cell walls characteristic of plants.

In addition to the oboe, he played the violin and harpsichord and later the organ. He composed numerous musical works, including 24 symphonies and many concertos, as well as some church music."

The greatest astronomical observer of all time, working with telescopes that he designed and built himself. A real dumbass, subby.

\farking troll headlines and tags
 
2014-08-06 03:45:24 PM

Hagbardr: [31.media.tumblr.com image 380x348]


Rowsdower!

/Is that a stupid name?
 
2014-08-06 04:25:44 PM
I was just at his house in Bath, where he discovered Uranus from his backyard.
Lots of his instruments are still there, too

coooooooool
 
2014-08-06 05:01:26 PM

Nurglitch: I always refer to it as "The Anus," never "Uranus."


It's Ouranus.
 
2014-08-06 06:41:11 PM

Vacation Bible School: Nurglitch: I always refer to it as "The Anus," never "Uranus."

It's Ouranus.


Funny you should say that: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ouranos
 
2014-08-06 09:12:00 PM

Skyd1v: Because People in power are Stupid: There is life on the sun. I saw it on an episode of Futurama.

[oyster.ignimgs.com image 610x374]

Well, that's a dubious source if I ever saw one.

I get my science information from BBCA...


img.fark.net


As do I...
i1101.photobucket.com
 
2014-08-06 09:39:44 PM
I would  venture to guess that "the guy who discovered Uranus" was Urobstetrician.
 
2014-08-06 10:10:54 PM

Skyd1v: I get my science information from BBCA...


Who?

theinfosphere.org
 
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